2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
43 members (Burkey, Bett, anotherscott, 1957, Auraltuner, cmb13, BrokenSymmetry, Alexander Acosta, 9 invisible), 386 guests, and 404 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Re: Digital Piano Volume
bennevis #2994981 06/25/20 06:52 AM
Joined: Jun 2020
Posts: 47
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jun 2020
Posts: 47
Originally Posted by bennevis
To be able to play the piano with control at any volume, first you have to develop that control.

I often see kids banging away on digitals because they can, because they have the volume turned right down - often at the instigation of their parents who don't know any better (they want to know their kids are practicing but they don't actually want to hear the cacophony). And they then wonder why their kids can't play softly properly on acoustic pianos.

This is especially important for beginners who are developing their 'keyboard sense': they need to practice using goalposts that are the same width as those on real playing fields.
I think that's what I'm getting at - although the issues that triggered this for me wasn't so much playing softly as playing too heavily for something that required a light touch.

I'm even tempted to put into my practice schedule winding up the volume and playing something I know, quietly - just as an exercise in control. Like winding up the metronome a few clicks beyond comfortable just to push out the envelope.

Last edited by mizmar; 06/25/20 06:53 AM.
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Digital Piano Volume
bennevis #2995040 06/25/20 10:27 AM
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,888
C
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,888
Originally Posted by bennevis
. . .
You want a similar volume via the DP's speakers or headphones as you'd get playing with the same force on an acoustic, otherwise you won't be able to develop your sense of touch (and dynamics and nuances and......).

+1.

Low-priced DP's tend to have low-powered amps and small loudspeakers, and they simply can't match the sound levels of an acoustic piano. For those, "volume at maximum" is a reasonable starting point. If the sound distorts when you play at fff, turning down the volume would be sensible.


. Charles
---------------------------
PX-350 / microKorg XL+ / Pianoteq / Lounge Lizard / EV ZXA1 speaker
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #2995048 06/25/20 11:30 AM
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 13
K
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
K
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 13
If possible on your setup, you can also try adjusting the reverb on the DP. This helps make the output sound more full so it seems more like an acoustic in a room. When I am playing without enough reverb, I end up turning up the volume so that it sounds as full as my acoustic, but then it becomes so loud that I feel like it's going to damage my hearing in the long run.

The other detail that might help with simulating an acoustic with headphones is having "open-back" headphones. These may not only improve the clarity of the sound but also allow outside noise to come in, so it doesn't feel like you are isolated from the rest of the world. When you play an acoustic, all the outside noises, for better (birds, rain, wife, etc.) or worse (traffic, neighbors, wife, etc.), are allowed in. The open-back headphones almost layer the piano over your ambient noise, so that might help you adjust the volume to match an acoustic.


Kawai VPC1, K-800, KG-6C
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3023506 09/10/20 06:36 AM
Joined: Jun 2020
Posts: 47
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jun 2020
Posts: 47
Just thought I'd report back on this.

I actually asked the host of the YouTube ThePianoforever, because he reviews a lot of digital and analogue pianos, and he said he normally winds the volume right up. I guess he moderates that for some keyboards, but it's an indicator.

So, over the weeks I've been slowly and steadily winding the volume up, then lightening my touch etc. as I practice to keep the volume under control. All in all, this has been an improvement, technique wise, I reckon.

Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3023581 09/10/20 11:35 AM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,348
T
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,348
I usually keep the volume half way. Some of the time I even drop it down closer to 1/4 when I'm just learning the notes. It's necessary to keep the volume at 1 comfortable level and let your fingers do all the work.

I belong to a music group. Once there was an elderly lady in her 80s with hearing problem I assumed has to do with playing loud music close to her ears. I rarely play keyboard at full volume or use headphones. If I'm on an acoustic piano, I may put on ear plugs for extra protection. I make recording samples along the way. They tell me if my loud & soft spots come out properly. Your fingers learn to feel how much pressure is loud and how much is soft. Don't like to get the volume too high to the point of causing a headache. Hearing loss later on is irreversible.

Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3024063 09/11/20 03:36 PM
Joined: Aug 2019
Posts: 76
O
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
O
Joined: Aug 2019
Posts: 76
I wish the DP companies made it easier to set the volume of a DP to mimic an acoustic. I don't have access to an acoustic, so I'm really just guessing where to set the volume.

Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3024151 09/12/20 03:01 AM
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,888
C
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,888
Both Android and Apple smartphones have apps for "sound level meter".

. . . Set the meter for "Peak reading" if you can;

. . . Play a mf chord on an acoustic piano, with the phone near your head, and read the value;

. . . Go to your DP, and adjust the volume so that you get the same peak reading with (roughly) the same "touch" on the keys, for the same chord.

That's not precise (for lots of reasons), but it'll put you in the ballpark.

Last edited by Charles Cohen; 09/12/20 03:01 AM.

. Charles
---------------------------
PX-350 / microKorg XL+ / Pianoteq / Lounge Lizard / EV ZXA1 speaker
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3024159 09/12/20 05:15 AM
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 187
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jun 2017
Posts: 187
With an FP30, you can use their Piano Partner 2 App to check out the settings and get a number for the volume rather than guess how many lights it's showing on the piano itself.
I leave mine set on 45 as I don't like it too loud.

I use Bose headphones which are plenty loud enough at this volume, and have glued a nice white hook to the inside surface of the piano to hang them from so they're always neatly available.

Without headphones, the piano sounds plenty loud enough at that setting too, but then I don't like a lot of noise smile

But it's all down to how you like it.


Does Magna Carta mean nothing to you? Did she die in vain?
Roland FP30 in white
Re: Digital Piano Volume
Lillith #3024167 09/12/20 06:32 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 13,822
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 13,822
Originally Posted by Lillith
But it's all down to how you like it.
If you want to be able to play on acoustics, you need to set the volume on your digital (via headphones or its speakers) close to that of an acoustic, so that you develop the control required to play everything from pp to ff, and all the nuances of voicing etc.

Those who set the volume excessively low won't be able to play softly and evenly on real pianos, and likely end up banging - I often see kids and adults who learnt on digitals doing that in piano showrooms. Whereas those who learnt on acoustics at home develop the control required very early on........they can only play softly by playing softly, so they have to learn how to play softly whistle. (After all, playing ff all the time on an acoustic is not just tiring, it also hurts your ears and damages your hearing in the long term, and nobody wants to listen to a deaf pianist, not even if that pianist is Luddy wink . Artur Rubinstein - who never played a digital in his long life - went blind in his old age but kept performing successfully because he retained good hearing.)

But there is absolutely no reason why learners using digitals can't develop the same control (assuming their digitals are decent enough): treat your digital as a real piano by setting the volume control at a realistic level (or two levels - one for its speakers, another for your headphones) - and never change the setting unless you change your headphones.

Incidentally, I practise what I preach: I've only changed the volume setting on my digital three times in ten years - each time because I changed my headphones (my digital has no speakers). And of course the setting equates to that of an acoustic - principally, the six-foot C.Bechstein grand (in a medium-sized lecture theatre) on which I play my monthly recitals. I have no trouble transitioning directly from my digital to the grand, performing all the new pieces that I learnt on my digital, without having practised them on any acoustic beforehand.

And don't listen to those who espouse the value of changing the volume setting regularly to "develop finger strength", whatever that means. They're talking through their hats - those Russian bears who break strings in Rach 3 or Islamey have never played digitals in their lives, and they can play ffff trills (as well as break strings) using 4-5 smirk .

BTW, there are a few concert pianists who have digitals as well as acoustics at home, and they may blog about practising at low volume on their digitals late at night. They can without damaging their hard-earned technique, because their technical skills are already fully developed, and they almost always only use the digitals to learn the notes or to practise repetitive stuff, purely to get the notes into their bones. But they then do their real practising on their acoustics.

Of course, you should ignore all my advice above if you only ever play on your own digital, and aren't bothered about developing a real piano technique.......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3024206 09/12/20 09:16 AM
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 262
S
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
S
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 262
I’m another who started on a digital with volume too low, leading me to pound on it.

So I agree with everyone suggesting trying to match it up to similar “bang for the buck” as an acoustic.


Yamaha U1. Yamaha P-45. Yamaha RD-250 (a long time ago). smile
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3025556 09/16/20 09:57 AM
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 921
G
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
G
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 921
A nice and simple approach is to turn the volume up as high as you possibly can until you reach the limitations of its amplifier and speakers and starts to distort. Then back of the volume slightly and glue it in that position for ever :-)

Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3025568 09/16/20 10:20 AM
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 42
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 42
Wow I have a P515 set at around 4.5/10. If I go louder then 5/6 it just sound way too loud.
But I'll definitly try to push it to 7/10 and play softer. Will be an interesting experience.


Yamaha P-515
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3025811 09/16/20 09:35 PM
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 42
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 42
Oh my lord. I've put the P-515 ot about 70% of maximum volume and I've been experimenting with it all night.

It is crazy how difficult it now is to obtain the correct sound out of each keys stroke. I now have to be extra careful and mindful of each and every note I play. I've been looping the same bars all night because I could never achieve the same consistent playing I could easily do before. It is insanely difficult to keep the notes sounding how I want them when playing stuff I don't currently master. Or when I speed the tempo, it add extra layers of difficulties. You guys just made me a rookie all over again laugh It will definitly be some time before I'm anywhere confortable with the sensitiveness of the keys. I played some accoustics and I don't remember them having anywhere close to that level of sensitiveness. I might dial the sound output down just a little bit and work my way back to 70-80% with practice. Because now, to get a sound that is pleasing to my ears, I have to play so soft that sometimes the key strokes don't register and I get no sound. I'm not sure I like it to be quite honest.


Yamaha P-515
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3026176 09/17/20 10:26 PM
Joined: Sep 2019
Posts: 69
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Sep 2019
Posts: 69
This has been a thread with very valuable information for a rookie like myself. Thanks!
Muskie

Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3026306 09/18/20 09:19 AM
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 481
W
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
W
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 481
mareg, as I've mentioned in this thread, my teacher told me to dial down the volume on my digital and that helped me to play better on the concert grand. I also have regular access to a Yamaha upright. I don't disagree with bennevis. I can totally understand why some people should dial up the volume. But for me, the opposite was what I needed. People are doing different things on different instruments. Since you don't have a teacher, just experiment with this and don't go overboard.

Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3026334 09/18/20 11:00 AM
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 42
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 42
I must say I've been trying very hard to like the volume set very high.

But I can hardly make the DP sound as good. Even when I play very soft there is something that sounds irritating to my hears. When I play upright accoustic, I have no issue making them sounds good. I have another DP in the house, an entry level Casio PX-160. This one when I push the volume is not as irritating as my P-515. I'd really like to know if anyone with a P-515 like his DP set at very high volume output from the integrated speakers.
I tought it would give me more "Range" in dynamics. It might do actually. But now I got no range where the sound is not aggressively attacking my hears unless I try to play ppp. And when playing ppp sometimes the notes don't even register, which is very frustrating. It is even worst with headphones. I cringe from the high volume and the tonality is all wrong.


Yamaha P-515
Re: Digital Piano Volume
mareg #3026368 09/18/20 12:20 PM
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,888
C
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 5,888
Originally Posted by mareg
I must say I've been trying very hard to like the volume set very high. . .


. . . But now I got no range where the sound is not aggressively attacking my hears unless I try to play ppp. And when playing ppp sometimes the notes don't even register, which is very frustrating. It is even worst with headphones. I cringe from the high volume and the tonality is all wrong.

Have you tried changing the "Touch" setting? See what happens if you use a heavier touch setting, than what you normally practice with. That might help.

It's also possible (I think) to reduce the "brightness" of the P515 tone. Either with a "brightness" setting, or with built-in EQ. If you're using EQ, reduce the mid-high frequencies, in the 2 kHz-5 kHz range. That may give you a tone that you like better.


. Charles
---------------------------
PX-350 / microKorg XL+ / Pianoteq / Lounge Lizard / EV ZXA1 speaker
Re: Digital Piano Volume
vintagevt #3026405 09/18/20 01:51 PM
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 2,520
2000 Post Club Member
Online Content
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 2,520
You can try putting the piano in different positions in the room. Against a wall may emphasize bass, in a corner moreso, perhaps. Moving the piano away from the walls may reduce bass but sound better to your ears.

You can change the room. Dull the sound a bit with a rug, covering the windows, adding some fluffy furniture. Sparkle the room by doing the opposite. Or try a different room.

Re: Digital Piano Volume
mareg #3026440 09/18/20 03:37 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 95
I
Ido Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
I
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 95
Stop before you incur irreversible damage to you ears. Your first priority is to protect your hearing.
I've got the P515 and I can't play above 2/3 of the volume without getting a headache. I'm in a relatively small space though.
I used to play with the medium touch (the default setting) but I recently switched to soft1, to ease my transition to acoustics (the banging on keys effect).
The p515 is considered a 'bright' DP, but in fact it doesn't have the edge and cutting ability of an acoustic, so I found myself constantly trying to compensate for that.
Note that the required volume level may change depending on the time of day and the surrounding noise. In mid day, with traffic noise and air conditioning, you may need more volume. But at night you can do with less. It's like using headphones (without noise cancellation) in a bus - you'd have to crank the volume up to hear anything (not recommended).

I do recommend not to play with the volume under 30%, even at night. You should always feel the piano sound is completely drowning the action noise and that you don't fight the keyboard to get sound.

Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Karsten Collection
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Our October 2020 Free Piano Newsletter is Here!
---------------------
3,000,000+!
------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Anthony Hopkins / National Cat Day
by MH1963 - 10/29/20 09:38 PM
Passable new string
by LemonColor - 10/29/20 09:06 PM
Faure Improvization
by cmb13 - 10/29/20 08:45 PM
Once upon a time there was a real Gors and Kallman
by Lady Bird - 10/29/20 07:01 PM
Practice advice
by 3B43 - 10/29/20 06:01 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics202,484
Posts3,018,571
Members99,068
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4