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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022504 09/07/20 02:43 PM
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I just listened to your Beethoven; it was remarkably sensitively played for someone so new to playing piano. You're on a good track. Also, I can understand your feelings about this particular piece; I play it about 10 times per month myself, and it never gets old.

If you get physical pain playing, something is not right. Maybe you keep your muscles too tense without relaxing in between finger/hand movements. This is certainly something I would ask a very experienced person about (eg. a good teacher), and then do my darndest to grasp the answer.


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022517 09/07/20 03:08 PM
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Hmm - I'm not sure that I can help.
I think the playing is lovely, tbh, but to me at times it's almost as though you are 'drifting off' with the music in places, losing concentration. If that's the case, perhaps others can advise - possibly you need to practice more without 'too much' expression to get the music more firmly embedded in the 'muscle memory', but it's something I've never completely conquered myself except by playing the pieces more often as 'exercises' and mentally prodding myself when I'm about to 'drift off.'


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
QuasiUnaFantasia #3022534 09/07/20 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by QuasiUnaFantasia
I just listened to your Beethoven; it was remarkably sensitively played for someone so new to playing piano. You're on a good track. Also, I can understand your feelings about this particular piece; I play it about 10 times per month myself, and it never gets old.

If you get physical pain playing, something is not right. Maybe you keep your muscles too tense without relaxing in between finger/hand movements. This is certainly something I would ask a very experienced person about (eg. a good teacher), and then do my darndest to grasp the answer.

I'm not going to make any comment about technical accuracy. But QuasiUnaFantasi is right you feel Moonlight Sonata, it is lovely to listen to. But finding pieces closer to your level and building your technique through hard work with some guidance will unfortunately be part of what is required.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022553 09/07/20 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Granyala
Well, you asked for it. Ye have been warned, what lies ahead is not for the faint of heart (or ears).

I just listened to your recordings. With this kind of build-up, I was expecting some serious train wrecks...even had some popcorn handy. What a letdown! smile

Seriously though...I think you are doing quite well. Yes, there are some obvious mistakes and hesitations. But that happens to all of us - especially when the recorder is running. My teacher has to remind me on a regular basis that I will never produce a "perfect" performance. I don't like it, no sir I don't...but such is life.

I'm not familiar with Aerith so I don't have any comments there. I've played the Beethoven and the Bach. You're doing some really lovely things with the Beethoven. Some nice dynamic changes especially. The one thing I noticed is that the melody is not always coming out. You are doing it perfectly a lot of the time, but occasionally it gets buried by the left hand. Voicing the melody is not easy though, and I think for 2 years in you've got a great start on it.

For the Bach - if you haven't done this already, you might find it helpful to practice it as blocked chords. I do this for any pieces with broken chords to get used to the transitions and the hand shape required for each chord. Then you can use different practice techniques to help even out the 16th notes and eventually bring up the speed, if you choose to.

Thanks for sharing your playing, it was enjoyable to listen to! I haven't had the nerve to post anything of mine yet.


I ❤️ Mendelssohn, Yann Tiersen, Heller
Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022563 09/07/20 04:54 PM
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My comments. These are not meant as criticism but just things I noticed that you may consider, or you may ignore as you see fit.

MoonLIGHT sonata

You have a good idea of what the piece should sound like and like someone else said I think you play with sensitivity, but I also think that your technique is just not good enough right now to really play this piece well. The melody is sometimes overwhelmed by the triplets and gets lost. Your right thumb sticks out too loud at times. There are places where it sounds a bit "struggled". Put it aside and come back to it in a year or two and you will be surprised how easy it is and how much better you can play it.

Bach Praeludium

It's really important in this piece to keep it moving. If you interrupt the flow it ruins the whole piece. One thing that helps is to play the whole piece as blocked chords instead of arpeggio patterns. It helps you memorize it and by listening to the chord progression it develops your sense of where the piece is going.

Aerith's theme (simple)

I'm not familiar with this piece but it was very pleasant to listen to. If you made any mistakes then I didn't notice. You keep the flow of the music very well and give it the right character I think.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022564 09/07/20 05:02 PM
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Yes your links work now. Well i found it well played. Your comments are too harsh, or again maybe you are too impatient. Of course you loose track several times in particular in the Bach, but that is normal given your experience. There would a lot to say about your interpretation, but it is not really the topic. In the Beethoven, one can feel you are not secure, there are hesitations at the beginning and in some other places and you tend to loose the tempo at times, at the end especially.

What i did notice and maybe that is just a coincidence, is that all these pieces are somehow in the same character. Rather slow, arpegiatted, mostly pedaled and legato. My advice would be to scale back on easier pieces so that you can feel more secure and then work out fully the interpretation. I would also suggest you play faster pieces and pieces where you have to use various effects, stacatto and legato, runs, small jumps, and so on. You need to vary your pieces abd work on different articulation if you want to make progress. Right now you play Bach as if it is like Aerith .... but all in all, it seems like you are in pretty good shape.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022588 09/07/20 06:42 PM
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I listened to the Moonlight and the Bach. For only playing 2 years I think you play pretty well. Your playing has a fairly steady tempo. The one thing that sticks out to me and may explain why you think your hands are stupid is that your playing is for the most part all one sound level. It may be a combination of not having the control over your hands that you would like, or that you do not hear it. I’m not a teacher but I think it may take several years before you gain more control over your hands and the sounds they produce on the keyboard. Try to increase your technical skills by playing different styles of pieces (mentioned by Sidokar) at a less difficult level and develop critical hearing skills by listening to lots of music, preferably played by professional pianists.



Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022623 09/07/20 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Granyala
Aerith's theme (simple)
Hands were definitely tired, 4 attempts to sort of get through it. Rough, but I hope you get the picture.

I'm surprised so many people are unfamiliar with Aerith's Theme from FF7. Maybe a sign of the various age groups and cultural backgrounds here.

Anyway that sounded like the OST rather than the "Piano Collections" version right? For what it's worth, I generally feel like the the OST pieces of Final Fantasy songs are harder than they initially appear. There's some kind of awkward fingering and hand positioning, like trying to play legato while jumping multiple octaves.

Certainly there were tempo issues but overall it sounded alright. The couple places you messed up kind of make sense. Just need more familiarity with the piece really.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3022759 09/08/20 10:20 AM
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Okay, I'll put in my two cents. After your introduction I also expected much worse.
My diagnosis from a distance is this: You are obviously talented to a certain extent. My experience with talented and / or smart people is that they run into the wall of incompentence much later then other people, and sometimes they never do up to a certain point. And then when it happens, sometimes they have no experience of how to deal with that. You have to acknowledge that, allthough you are doing pretty well, you are moving too fast. If more practice doesn't make it better, then you are doing something wrong. Either your set of practice methods is too small, or the repertoire is too advanced.
I enjoy practicing because of the progress I make, even if I cannot play the piece I am working for a long time. If you do not enjoy practicing, then it is costing too much effort.
Six months working on a piece is a long time. Sometimes it does take this long (I usually need several months for a new piece), but I think for somebody who has been playing for two years, it is too long.
You are being too harsh a teacher on yourself!

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
rkzhao #3024165 09/12/20 06:28 AM
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Wee… weekends. I finally have the time, to compile the feedback and formulate answers. laugh
Originally Posted by rocket88
When asked to slow down, at least 50% of my students will play at the very same fast speed; and some play even faster!

Hey @rocket88,
oh, I definitely play too fast to soon. For mostly two reasons:

1) The pieces are played fast in their original incarnation, so my ear always expects the piece to flow and subconsciously I try to play “at tempo” way too soon.
2) Many of the pieces are of the variety that “fall apart” when I play them slowly. I find it super difficult to practice these passages, since my ear no longer gets a melody to follow and instead gets disjointed frequencies that do not make sense thrown at it.

I try to restrain myself as much as possible. I’ve read that the best practice speed is “too slow to fail” because we learn mistakes and success equally. But you know how it is, especially if you have an easy passage in midst of the harder ones. The foot just hits the gas. laugh

Originally Posted by Animisha
So my advice to you is to try to find much, much easier pieces, and focus on playing them as well as possible, focus on pouring your musicality and your soul in those pieces and see if this makes for a much more enjoyable practising. There are many lovely and exciting easy pieces out there - so try to find one that appeals to you, and give it a chance.

Hello @Animisha,
Yup. Both my teacher and I are aware that the pieces are beyond my level. And that’s okay. It’s really hard for me to find easy stuff that my ear finds pleasing. My teacher once showed me the kind of pieces that I should be playing at my level (when I asked her about the efficiency of our approach). I think I would stop playing the piano within a month if I were forced to play them. She asked me “Do you really want to play that stuff?” I answered “No, definitely not.” She chuckled and merely retorted “me neither.”
So, if some stuff doesn’t work in Moonlight, Archipelago, Succession… that’s okay. I do not expect everything to work. That’s why I stated that the easy pieces like the Praeludium or the Aerith piece frustrate me most, because I expect these to work.

Originally Posted by JB_PW
(2) it's not all going to magically go away as your skills improve. Probably not what you wanted to hear!
It's helpful (especially for your confidence) if you work on some easier pieces too...stuff that's at a level where you don't have to be totally focused on the notes and you can start concentrating on being musical. That's where the real satisfaction comes into play (in my experience).
Is it possible you are on the "perfectionism spectrum" like myself?

Hello @JB_PW,
I can take such answers, do not worry. In the back of my head I already though that more time would be needed. Still, yes: skills and time do not matter much if the technique is flawed. In that regard I do trust my teacher, she will guide me through the jungle.
Regarding the easier pieces, see above. I haven’t found any so far. As for the “confidence”: wrong person to ask. I never have any confidence in anything I do and always double/triple check myself.
Not just a possibility, a fact. Even if I hit the right notes, I immediately find 25 things that I did wrong. Guess it’s a curse.

Originally Posted by pianorla
First of all, what musical experience/background do you have, if any? My first thought while looking at the titles of the pieces you listed was either you're a quick learner and have good natural ability or you've dived in and are depending on muscle memory to play these pieces. Have you worked through exercises/technique/method books with your teacher or are you just playing pieces you enjoy/strive towards and mastering finger movements though those?

How fluent are you with reading music and processing all the necessary information at once? When you practice and make a mistake, do you restart a piece from the beginning and try to plough through it without making that mistake, or do you take note and hone in on what you need to work on (specific bars, patterns, dynamics?)

Ok so your ulterior goal when you are playing is to be able play your pieces from memory?
No one here would want to see you be on the verge of quitting for the reasons and thoughts you mentioned.

Hey @pianorla,
I had 2.5 years of flute experience when I started the piano. Regarding technological exercises and etudes: so far I haven’t played any. Did a little of Hanon in the beginning but I usually fall asleep when playing them. Super hard to stay focused, so I do not consider them very effective. So most things are learned through repertoire, yes.

I wouldn’t call my music reading ability “fluent” at all. Esp. the bass clef *chuckles* As for dealing with mistakes: starting from the beginning would be quite ineffective. Here is what I do:
I play the piece as far as I am currently working on it. If mistakes occur, I make a mental note. If these mistakes happen repeatedly, indicating a systematic error, I give the passage some attention. Within the passage I try to narrow it down further until I am at the root of the problem. If the mistakes are random slip-ups, I mostly ignore them. If too many random mistakes appear, I tone down the playing tempo.

Yes, I automatically play from memory, by the time my hands have learned the movements. The pieces I posted are played 100% from memory. I HATE having to look up and down, since my eyesight isn’t all that good, I need ~ half a second to adjust in order to see clearly. Takes way too long. Same is true when typing at a computer. I either look at the keyboard or the screen.
Surrender is not an option. When I started this hobby I said that I will give the instrument 10 years before making an assessment.

Originally Posted by rkzhao
I'm assuming you find those pieces enjoyable and relaxing by themselves?
My hands just remembers the patterns once I start playing.
Rather than playing at 110%, you should turn your brain down to like 40% and let your hands take over.
Aloha @rkzhao,
Yes, these are pieces I am quite fond of. I would not call Archipelago relaxing though. Esp. in the end, there is quite some energy to it.

Same for me. Memory only works when my hands are on the black and whites. I can’t even play the piece on the table etc.
I think that is the crux of the problem: my hands are not yet capable of doing that. Even in Bachs Praeludium, that is as repetitive as it gets, I need a lot of concentration.

Hello @seeker,
Aye, I think so too. As for automatizing patterns, I think I need to bug my teacher about it a bit more.

Hey @KevinM,
Thanks, Calavera plays quite beautifully!

Good day @zrtf90,
I agree, solving problems can be huge fun. Interesting thoughts about the Praeludium. It’s a piece that you generally find at the end of the “first year” books, so I did not perceive it as hard at all. Technically, what you do is the same in every bar. It was the first piece that I had to memorize deliberately, because my brain and hands had no trouble with the pattern at all. I do agree that speed of delivery (and constant speed at that! *hic*) is the huge challenge here.

Super interesting stuff about memorization. Thanks! What do you mean by recalling though? Playing or recalling it note for note away from the piano? I can tell you that the latter is super ineffective. I have done that as a test with a piece for my flute and considered it an unsuitable approach. Agree on the “work outside short term memory”. I learn Japanese vocabulary that way. Try to remember the words in the mid of day, no matter what you are currently doing, only give yourself hints if you fail.

How do I express emotion w/o feeling it? That does not compute for me.


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024179 09/12/20 06:58 AM
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Originally Posted by QuasiUnaFantasia
I just listened to your Beethoven; it was remarkably sensitively played for someone so new to playing piano. You're on a good track. Also, I can understand your feelings about this particular piece; I play it about 10 times per month myself, and it never gets old.

Hey @ QuasiUnaFantasia,
Agreed! I must have played it like 300 times by now but I still love it. Thank you for your kind words. 😊

Originally Posted by petebfrance
I think the playing is lovely, tbh, but to me at times it's almost as though you are 'drifting off' with the music in places, losing concentration.

Hello @petebfrance,
You hit the nail on the head. Maintaining the level of concentration needed is one of my biggest problems, especially what I start feeling stuff while playing. It gets a bit better if I disconnect my emotional core but not by much.
Originally Posted by JB_PW
I just listened to your recordings. With this kind of build-up, I was expecting some serious train wrecks...even had some popcorn handy. What a letdown! smile
My teacher has to remind me on a regular basis that I will never produce a "perfect" performance. I don't like it, no sir I don't...but such is life.

Crap… my very first “performance” and I already failed to meet the audience’s expectations. laugh
Thanks for the kind words. Yes, I do believe we are quite pampered by listening to near perfect recordings for decades. It makes it difficult for the ear to accept, that this is not always the case when playing live.
Good tip about the blocked chords for the Bach, got that one from my teacher too! Definitely helped but my brain simply can’t spit out the data fast enough. laugh

Originally Posted by Qazsedcft
MoonLIGHT sonataPut it aside and come back to it in a year or two and you will be surprised how easy it is and how much better you can play it.
Aerith's theme (simple)
I'm not familiar with this piece but it was very pleasant to listen to. If you made any mistakes then I didn't notice. You keep the flow of the music very well and give it the right character I think.

Hey @Qazsedcft,
Thank you for your kindness. I completely agree on the moonlight™ sonata. The piece is currently only in maintenance mode. I want to keep it in memory and ready to be recalled but I know that I currently don’t have the technical prerequisites to refine it further.
Interesting thoughts about the Aerith piece. I will have to link a better run at some point, when my hands aren’t as tired as they were when I recorded it.

Hello @sidokar,
Sounds logical, I will have to consult my teacher about supplying me with appropriate material of different styles.

Hi @ PianogrlNW,
Ooh I definitely lack control. No surprise there. Oftentimes I have to fight against my right hand in order to force it to move the way I want. Hard to explain but there is simply resistance in it. Feels quite weird and unnatural. Most easily noticed when I practice 1-3 -> 2-4 -> 3-5 patterns. It's as if the hand doesn't WANT to do the movement.

@rkzhao: well it was a simplified/stripped down version of the piano collections one. Someone on this forum suggested it when I stated that the “real version” that I want to play is way beyond me right now. laugh

Hello @ErfurtBob,
I wouldn’t go as far and say that I do not enjoy practicing. Solving problems is fun to me. Repetition not as much but I recognize that it’s part of the process. If I see improvements, I can feel that it was “worth it” and move on. I was explicitly referring to the “I relax/enjoy when I am at the piano” because that is not something I can do. Well. maybe when playing Hanon. I catch myself thinking about virtually anything EXCEPT the piano when I play those patterns. :X



Phew, all caught up now. Thank you all for so many responses, thoughtful critique and encouragement!


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024234 09/12/20 10:27 AM
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The Bach prelude has some hesitations but is good. The Beethoven moonlight sonata is sounding nice as you projecting the melody but I would try easier pieces as others have suggested as I think it is too long to have to spend 6 months to learn a piece.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024245 09/12/20 10:53 AM
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I personally would suggest not keep the beethoven sonata in maintenance mode. I have always been advised once I've learnt a piece to move on. If it is too hard you can always come back later to finish it. If you have taken 6 months to play then I would suggest more of a reason to move on to other pieces as otherwise you are likely to only play a small number of pieces per year.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024354 09/12/20 03:11 PM
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Hey Moo :),

maintenance mode only means playing it once every 2-3 days. I don't think 7 minutes is too much effort in order to keep it alive.
It's one of the pieces I want in my permanent arsenal, so I might as well start burning it in.


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024389 09/12/20 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Granyala
Interesting thoughts about the Praeludium. It’s a piece that you generally find at the end of the “first year” books...
Not in my experience. It's typically a year five piece.

Originally Posted by Granyala
What do you mean by recalling though?
We remember more than we realise. Recall is deliberately bringing the memory back.

If you play a passage fifteen times, say, most of the repeats are from short term memory. It is not exercising recall. If you get back to the piano the next day it won't be in short term memory. It will be somewhere in memory but you may not be able to recall it. The easy way to recall it is to go back to the score. A harder way is to sing the music to yourself and try to play it by ear, try to piece together snippets and put them in the right order, force yourself to recall it, etc. This is the struggle that builds recall pathways. The more pathways we have to a memory, the easier it is to recall it.

When I learn a new recital piece I learn it phrase by phrase. I don't repeat much at all, once or twice each day. The next day I try to recall it without referring to the score. When I do refer to the score I read it without playing until I can recall it the next day. Only then, when it's in explicit memory do I start repeating it. Lots of repeats before it's in explicit memory puts it into implicit memory (procedural memory, muscle memory, a cue based system). This prevents having to struggle to recall it.

Originally Posted by Granyala
Playing or recalling it note for note away from the piano? I can tell you that the latter is super ineffective.
Most performing artists and athletes will tell you the opposite. When you visualise it you can see it in micro details, play it super slow with flawless technique and every such repeat builds the same neural pathways as actually playing it. When you consciously imagine playing each note, knowing the note, the finger and the piano-key, not relying on muscle memory but explicitly going through the procedure of engaging each muscle, mentally or actually, it's a very powerful technique and it's very efficient.


Richard
Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024545 09/13/20 05:03 AM
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Yeah five? Are we talking about the same prelude here?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prelude_and_Fugue_in_C_major,_BWV_846

I've seen multiple books that start with "hello children, this is a C!" and end with that piece seemingly being designed around a 1 year period.

Thanks for elaborating on the recall procedures. I typically practice the same way, though that comes more from the inability to read the notes while playing, since I have to watch my hands. I find memorizing for the piano much easier than memorizing for the flute (where I cannot see my hands and merely stare at the notes while playing).

So, basically, you are able to sit on the couch and write down all the notes, articulations, phrasing instructions etc of the piece from memory? Impressive.


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
Granyala #3024561 09/13/20 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Granyala
Yeah five? Are we talking about the same prelude here?
Yes, the first prelude from the Well-Tempered Clavier. It's Grade 5, ABRSM. I doubt I've heard it played at Grade 5 level by anyone below Grade 7. The control required to play the piece uniformly well requires years of practise. Getting the notes, maybe a few weeks.

Originally Posted by Granyala
So, basically, you are able to sit on the couch and write down all the notes, articulations, phrasing instructions etc of the piece from memory?
Write out the notes? Probably not. For the snippet I'm working on I can say what they are, when they're played and how they sound but writing out the notes differs because of spelling and such, among other things. I don't pay any attention to phrasing and articulation marks once I've memorised the sound from reading and listening. I don't disregard them but I do interpret them in such a way that I'd write them out differently.

When I learn a piece I'm going to memorise I'll memorise it first as music I can sing in my head. I read the score and audiate it every day until I can hum it accurately while I'm cooking or doing the washing up. When I get to the piano and start on it I've done a structural analysis, sorted it into what I think will be the most difficult bits and what will be playable from the score. I no longer need the score to know how it should sound. I just need it for the notes.

Originally Posted by Granyala
...the inability to read the notes while playing, since I have to watch my hands.
This is a big issue with a lot of students. It would be worth your while getting some easy method/repertoire book and practise following the score while working your way around the keyboard by touch. A few minutes a day will work wonders as the weeks and months go by. Our tactile sense is very rapid compared to vision. In time you will reach the keys faster by touch than you can by vision, leaps aside, which take a quick prior glance and no more.


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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
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It sounds like a problem if you cannot play music with a score. Relying on your memory to look at your hands is not sustainable. It appears to be a problem with adult pianists that rush the basics. I would discuss with your teacher how to work on this rather than online. I am sure it will mean easier material but if you want to progress you cannot skip the basics. Good luck.

Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
zrtf90 #3024637 09/13/20 11:50 AM
Joined: Nov 2017
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Originally Posted by zrtf90
[quote=Granyala]The control required to play the piece uniformly well requires years of practise. Getting the notes, maybe a few weeks.

I read the score and audiate it every day until I can hum it accurately while I'm cooking or doing the washing up.

This is a big issue with a lot of students. It would be worth your while getting some easy method/repertoire book and practise following the score while working your way around the keyboard by touch. A few minutes a day will work wonders as the weeks and months go by. Our tactile sense is very rapid compared to vision. In time you will reach the keys faster by touch than you can by vision, leaps aside, which take a quick prior glance and no more.
Hmm that explains a lot. Thanks, you just took any frustration regarding that particular piece away. Once I know that it is unrealistic to expect fluidity, I am no longer bothered by "brain lags".

Cool ability. I never got very far trying to make written notes sound in my head. Even single note lines for my flute pose quite a challenge. :X

I will incorporate it into my practice, have to bug my teacher for applicable pieces though. It worked fairly well with the Prelude before but there hands barely have to move anyway. I am currently learning this piece:



The left hand has to move a bit too much but the right one should be applicable for "blind play". Though I can barely play the hands together, I already don't need the sheet music. This one is so easily compressed. Barely any data in it.

Originally Posted by Moo :)
It appears to be a problem with adult pianists that rush the basics.

*whistles innocently*

Last edited by Granyala; 09/13/20 11:52 AM.

The backbone of modern industrial society is, and for the foreseeable future will be, the use of electrical Power.
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Re: Granyala's Q&A regarding practice frustration and patience
zrtf90 #3024870 09/14/20 06:35 AM
Joined: May 2016
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Originally Posted by zrtf90
If you play a passage fifteen times, say, most of the repeats are from short term memory. It is not exercising recall. If you get back to the piano the next day it won't be in short term memory. It will be somewhere in memory but you may not be able to recall it. The easy way to recall it is to go back to the score. A harder way is to sing the music to yourself and try to play it by ear, try to piece together snippets and put them in the right order, force yourself to recall it, etc. This is the struggle that builds recall pathways. The more pathways we have to a memory, the easier it is to recall it.

When I learn a new recital piece I learn it phrase by phrase. I don't repeat much at all, once or twice each day. The next day I try to recall it without referring to the score. When I do refer to the score I read it without playing until I can recall it the next day. Only then, when it's in explicit memory do I start repeating it. Lots of repeats before it's in explicit memory puts it into implicit memory (procedural memory, muscle memory, a cue based system). This prevents having to struggle to recall it.

thumb

It's very exhausting in the beginning, especially if your ears are not trained enough, but it's the way that leads to best results.

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