2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
74 members (anotherscott, anamnesis, 36251, BravoRomeo, astrotoy, AJB, Buzz209, brennbaer, 17 invisible), 1,025 guests, and 366 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 23
C
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 23
I almost always look at my left hand for some reason (I'm righthanded). I think it's because my right hand is much stronger than my left, and I need to focus more on what my left is doing.

Last edited by chopinliszt27; 08/01/20 10:43 PM.

Simplicity is the final achievement. After one has played a vast quantity of notes and more notes, it is simplicity that emerges as the crowning reward of art. --Fryderyk Chopin
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 205
F
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
F
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 205
A quote from Andrzej Jasinski, Krystian Zimerman's teacher: "When chopping wood, never look at the axe, but always at the piece of wood you want to hit. Likewise, when playing the piano, you should never look at your hands, but at the key you want to touch next."

Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 297
G
Gretel Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
G
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 297
Okay, maybe I should clarify: I either look at the score for the left hand or the keys that my left hand needs to press next.

But the quote is good. It reminds me of my motorbike lessons. The teacher told me to look at where I want to go. The bike would then go in that direction basically automatically (“der Blick führt die Bewegung“ - the eye leads the motion).

Meanwhile I developed a theory of why I do it: I follow the score for the left hand because it is easier to follow - usually fewer notes than the right hand. And it suffices to keep me going through the piece.
I look at the keys for the left hand because there are usually the jumps and also because it is easier to follow.


W.Hoffmann T122, Roland FP-50, Roland RD-64
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,377
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,377
Originally Posted by florhof
A quote from Andrzej Jasinski, Krystian Zimerman's teacher: "When chopping wood, never look at the axe, but always at the piece of wood you want to hit. Likewise, when playing the piano, you should never look at your hands, but at the key you want to touch next."
Yes, but when someone says they look at their LH I think they generally mean or it's taken for granted that they mean they are looking at the left side of the keyboard.

Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,269
A
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
A
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,269
At some point in the game, you get a mental "feel" for the keyboard. You know where everything is. It's kind of like making love - if you need a road map, you had better take up Swiss banking or bale cookies...you should not have to look.

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 25,792
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 25,792
Originally Posted by Auntie Lynn
At some point in the game, you get a mental "feel" for the keyboard. You know where everything is. It's kind of like making love - [...]

I'm not sure I get the analogy, but I won't ask you to explain. smile

Cheers!


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,198
C
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
C
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,198
Originally Posted by Auntie Lynn
At some point in the game, you get a mental "feel" for the keyboard. You know where everything is. It's kind of like making love - if you need a road map, you had better take up Swiss banking or bale cookies...you should not have to look.
Indeed. Presumably how blind people play. I was always taught to keep my eyes on the score but even with a good road map looking helps as the pieces become more and more complicated. And is an additional memory aid.


Yamaha U1A, Roland LX706

South Wales, UK
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,377
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 32,377
Originally Posted by Auntie Lynn
At some point in the game, you get a mental "feel" for the keyboard. You know where everything is. It's kind of like making love - if you need a road map, you had better take up Swiss banking or bale cookies...you should not have to look.
But then why do virtually all(actually I think it's 100% of sighted pianists) professional pianists look at the keyboard at least some of the time when playing without the score? Or are you saying it's not necessary to look all the time?

Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 6,676
L
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 6,676
When the hands move generally in contrary motion or have jumps in contrary motion or there are other difficulties good memorization of both hands separately can be a great help.

Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,362
P
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,362
I think pianists tend to look at the left side of the keyboard (or their left hand) because they can hear the melody in their head, the right hand melodic notes are closer together and so they can piece it together without looking. Whereas the left hand often has to make large jumps. Being left-handed does not give you any advantage in being more adept at left hand work without looking. Left-handed people have adapted to the RH being more active and providing the melody and find their left hand, although dominant, is less able to navigate the lower part of keyboard without looking.



Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Kawai ES520 Teardown
by KawaFanboi - 05/20/22 01:00 PM
My Kawai RX3 finally started to sounds like Kawai
by Joonsung - 05/20/22 12:52 PM
I need some advice
by Lúthien - 05/20/22 12:23 PM
Harmonization by pentatonic chords
by Nahum - 05/20/22 06:25 AM
Studio Grand from XLN audio for 62€
by klausi6 - 05/20/22 06:23 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics213,159
Posts3,193,175
Members105,328
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5