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Seiler upright (given to me in 1959 )
Kawai 500 grand (1967 ,a gift from my parents )and
a Gors and Kallmann.
The Gors and Kallmann was owned by my husband .
It was a stencel piano made in South Africa ,
by a man called Dietman.(1968)
This piano was well made ,and had a better tone than a Yamaha B2 .,not a super sensitive response though !
In 1990 this piano was sold .

In 1994 an older Broadwood upright was bought for a really low price.This instrument had a really beautiful
tone and was very expressive.It had a beautiful cabinet
and had ivory keys ,which bothered two of my music
students.,So I had explain to them that it was an old
piano and ivory was used in those days.

By the year 2000 we knew we were emmigrating to
Canada.At that stage we decided to bring the pianos
with.Because I taught the piano full time I needed two
pianos.
We were not sure the old Broadwood would survive
the trip so we sold it and bought a used U1 (1983) for
a good price.The old Broadwood was sold to the
to the student who was initially repulsed by it because
it had ivory keys.
The new U1 was bought for a good price because it was covered in scratches around the fallboard and lid.
The Kawai grand (500) and the U1 arrived a few months after we arrived in June 2001
Both pianos were in excellent condition after thier long
trip.They served me well here in my teaching and playing.
In 2017 we sold the treasured Kawai grand and the U1.
In 2018 we bought a Sauter upright which we both love.

Last edited by Lady Bird; 04/22/20 10:20 PM. Reason: Spelling
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Originally Posted by Lady Bird
Seiler upright (given to me in 1959 )
Kawai 500 grand (1967 ,a gift from my parents )and
a Gors and Kallmann.
The Gors and Kallmann was owned by my husband .
It was a stencel piano made in South Africa ,
by a man called Dietman.(1968)
This piano was well made ,and had a better tone than a Yamaha B2 .,not a super sensitive response though !
In 1990 this piano was sold .

In 1994 an older Broadwood upright was bought for a really low price.This instrument had a really beautiful
tone and was very expressive.It had a beautiful cabinet
and had ivory keys ,which bothered two of my music
students.,So I had explain to them that it was an old
piano and ivory was used in those days.

By the year 2000 we knew we were emmigrating to
Canada.At that stage we decided to bring the pianos
with.Because I taught the piano full time I needed two
pianos.
We were not sure the old Broadwood would survive
the trip so we sold it and bought a used U1 (1983) for
a good price.The old Broadwood was sold to the
to the student who was initially repulsed by it because
it had ivory keys.
The new U1 was bought for a good price because it was covered in scratches around the fallboard and lid.
The Kawai grand (500) and the U1 arrived a few months after we arrived in June 2001
Both pianos were in excellent condition after thier long
trip.They served me well here in my teaching and playing.
In 2017 we sold the treasured Kawai grand and the U1.
In 2018 we bought a Sauter upright which we both love.
I should have added that we also have a Kawai KL502
and a digital piano, a Roland LX 17
These two were bought last year. Although we have
both retired, I kept a few pupils ,so therefore the Kawai would be useful (for duos ) However now with the pandemic.I am not sure if we should keep the KawaI upright.

Last edited by Lady Bird; 04/22/20 10:35 PM. Reason: Missing word
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Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Not sure why, but I cannot get access to this thread except through OP’s profile. Unusual setting?

That is happening to me, too.

Regards,
Same here !

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Originally Posted by Lady Bird
Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Not sure why, but I cannot get access to this thread except through OP’s profile. Unusual setting?

That is happening to me, too.

Regards,
Same here !
For some reason the initial-post number didn't get set into the URL for the thread on the Piano Forum page. If you click on the thread link, then after it loads the error message, edit the number '0' in the URL to '2970160' it will work.


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Now I feel I've had a boring life, having owned only 3 different pianos.

First was a Kurtzmann console, purchased from a piano teacher in 1978. She liked the piano for its tone, which went well with her Steinway grand, but was selling it to make room for a second Steinway for student use. I enjoyed playing that piano quite a bit, and felt that its tone was much more pleasing than the majority of other consoles that I had heard.

In late 1996, being positioned better financially, I became interested in upgrading to a grand piano. After a long search, I discovered that the Kawai RX line was particularly pleasing to my ears, and ended up with a new RX-2. It was piano heaven for me, over many years. Eventually, I became aware of some deficiencies regarding the control the action was allowing, and problems achieving clear tonality from the bass. Occasionally I would look at piano ads, just to see what's available that might address those issues.

Then late last year I stumbled across a GX-6 online ad. The piano had been used for rental service for about one year, but was being sold as new with full warranty, and at a very attractive price. Of course I had to have a look, and found the action offered all the control I could want - and then some - and the tone, although different to the RX-2 I had enjoyed for 23 years, was absolutely gorgeous. Clear and distinct bass pitches, lovely mellow midrange and very pleasing treble. It seemed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and after being offered a generous trade-in for the RX-2, I decided I couldn't let the deal pass by. It arrived the day after New Year 2020, and has easily been the best thing that has happened to me this year, to put it mildly. It is definitely an instrument that I can enjoy for the remainder of my lifetime.


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This is a very interesting thread and I'm surprised at the large number of pianos many have owned. My list is shorter:
1. Baldwin Acrosonic 1974(my childhood piano that I gave to a friend)
2. Mason Hamlin A 2002 that I traded in for a
3. Mason Hamlin BB 2007

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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
This is a very interesting thread and I'm surprised at the large number of pianos many have owned. My list is shorter:
1. Baldwin Acrosonic 1974(my childhood piano that I gave to a friend)
2. Mason Hamlin A 2002 that I traded in for a
3. Mason Hamlin BB 2007

I haven't played a Mason BB - would you be so kind as to take a video of yourself playing it so we can enjoy the tone? That would be fun!

I played the concert grand at NAMM but couldn't really hear it because there was someone hacking out boogie-woogie incredibly loud next to me.


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Originally Posted by joe80
I haven't played a Mason BB - would you be so kind as to take a video of yourself playing it so we can enjoy the tone? That would be fun!

For you Joe, here is a 1930 Mason BB to give a listen to.

https://youtu.be/TIfac5om6I4


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Joe

You can also go here- use headphones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqnRDnssVXY&t


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Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by Maestro Lennie
Not sure why, but I cannot get access to this thread except through OP’s profile. Unusual setting?

There are a variety of odd behaviors lately. For example, if you click on "Piano World Home Page" above, and from there click on the forums, you'll discover that you're seemingly not logged in. But if you use the back button to go back to the forums, you will be. If you do the above in a new tab, you can actually have a session that's logged in, and one that's not simultaneously. Not that it matters much, of course, but--in layman's terms--it indicates that the various links let the session management get out of sync. I've also noticed that I can be logged in on two different devices, and my own posts from one device will show up as "new" and unread on the other device, when of course I've obviously read them because I wrote them.

Anyway, the nuances of maintaining a web app can be tricky.

I don't know whether this is related or not, but clicking "Use Full Editor" does not work for this thread. It just gives a blank screen. I have not checked whether it is currently working in other threads.

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1989 - 2000: mid 1960s Aeolian console, branded Mason & Hamlin. the piano I learned on. a piece of junk. never regulated, never voiced, suuuper light and uneven action. dynamic level--from loud&BRIGHT to LOUD&BRIGHT. somewhat harsh tone. all that said, it wasn't that bad. it was what we had and by the end of this period, I was able to play Henle level six pieces with some proficiency on it. my folks still have this piano in their home. my dad fiddles on it sometimes. they insist it is a good piano (it does say Mason & Hamlin on the fallboard.) I still cringe every time I visit when I sit down to play

2000 - 2018: 1998 Kurzweil SP88x stage piano. fully weighted action. twenty or so piano sounds. no internal speaker. went to college and moved around to twelve or thirteen different apartments with this digital. it has an even action and good dynamics but it does not feel like a real piano. kept me in shape and having fun for many years. it sits in a closet now, because now I own a real piano

2018 - present: 1997 Charles Walter 1520 French Provincial. bought a house and promptly got something I always wanted a house for: a place for a real piano to live. the Walter is so nice compared to the other pianos I had personal access to earlier in life. a substantial action, even and controllable. rich creamy tone in the treble; warm, round tenors; powerful bass. still a little finnicky for me with dynamics, but a broad range of dynamic possibilities from ppp to fff. it has taught me how to play on a properly weighted piano action. I love it so far, but I am thinking about getting it fully voiced and regulated for better sensitivity and a bit less power. in my room it reaches nearly 100 decibels from the player's position and I could do with a ppp that is a little easier to achieve. overall, I am very pleased

Future: who knows, but I would like to eventually acquire a high-quality grand. maybe a classic European make like a Bluthner or Bechstein. my model 1520 upright is so nice I am even thinking about owning one of the Walter grands someday


this is a fun thread. I really enjoyed reading through everyone's piano history. some of you have long, impressive lists of musical companions. color me jealous

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I only owned two acoustic pianos so far.

I traded my 1995 Yamaha G2 for an older 1980 Bosendorfer of the same size. It had been in storage for over 20 years though, so it practically have the same wear and tear as the Yamaha, if not less.

Ideally I want to trade the Yamaha for a bigger piano but it's rare to find second hand bosendorfer in my area, in that condition and at that price point. So I took the plunge. No regret.

I figured the piano would be good for the next 10 years or so. And then I'll trade it for the 214 VC, if my budget allows. My dream piano 😍

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I thought my piano journey might be of interest because it is a bit different - because I have developed an interest in early instruments. Apologies for the length of this post - I hope people find it interesting.

My parents married just after the War. They lived in central London. It was a time of rationing and shortages, nothing was easily available. My mother wanted to learn the piano. You couldn't just go out and buy a piano. But one day she noticed a grand piano in an antique shop near to their flat. My aunt, who taught the piano, gave it her seal of approval, and my mother bought it. It was a Blüthner, just under 6 feet long (180 cm). She made some progress in learning, and enjoyed playing Mozart K545. Then I came along, and that was the end of piano playing for my mother.

[Linked Image]


However, the piano remained, and in due course at the age of five I started piano lessons. I never gave the instrument any particular thought, it was just "our piano", and very pretty with its fretted music desk. I was aware that it had a much lighter touch than my teacher's piano - I later learned that this is because it has the Blüthner Patent action. In due course I must have developed an interest in the actual instrument - I was at school in central London, and one afternoon I took myself to the Blüthner showroom which was then in Conduit Street. I told them the serial number, 16189, and they told me that the piano was made in 1881; so it was then about 85 years old. (Like a 1935 piano nowadays). In 1981 we celebrated its centenary.

I still had not developed any knowledge or interest in the design of pianos. My mother always liked to have the house toasty warm in winter. We knew that this was bad for pianos, but inasmuch as we thought about it, we supposed that it was mainly bad for other people's pianos. Reality burst in as a rude shock when the tuner announced that the piano was untunable, the pins were simply not gripping. By this stage it was 1999 and we had owned the piano for over 50 years, and were very attached to it. We decided to investigate the possibilities of restoration. I had become very interested in period instruments; I realised that our Blüthner was pretty much a period instrument itself, and sought a restorer who was sympathetic to older instruments. The trail led to David Winston of the the Period Piano Company; he had restored Beethoven's Broadwood. He shimmed the soundboard cracks, installed larger tuning pins and new strings, and sent the hammers to Paris to be refelted.

In due course the piano came home. What a transformation! Having previously just been "our piano", it had now become a magnificent instrument. There is more to say about the Blüthner, but I shall leave that for another thread.

In the meantime I had been to University. I ceased to have piano lessons when I left school, but thought it would be nice to have a piano in my college room. In a piano shop in Cambridge my cousin found me an old German upright by Halsmayer. (Has anyone ever come across this make?) It cost £20, and we spent another £20 on improvement work. It had a very pleasing tone and I enjoyed discovering the Mozart sonatas on it. I still have it, in a second home where sadly it is neither played nor tuned as often as it should be.

The next step in my piano journey occurred in about 2010 when I discovered Finchcocks. Finchcocks was a private museum of early keyboard instruments, housed in a beautiful 18th century manor house in the pastoral Kent countryside. (A thread about Finchcocks here). There were about a hundred instruments, of which about half were playable and were kept well maintained. The wonderful thing about Finchcocks was that visitors were encouraged to play the instruments. And this made me fall under their spell. To sit down at the 1826 Graf and play Schubert, or the delightful decorated 1807 Stodart square and play Mozart, were extraordinary delights. I began to think that it would be lovely to have some sort of instrument like this at home. Here is a picture of the Stodart:

[Linked Image]

It's not difficult to find a late 18c or early 19c square piano in the UK, but it is quite difficult to find a nice one that has been restored and will not require a lot of work. But in due course patience was rewarded... In an auction I found an 1804 Broadwood square which played well and was very handsome. It proved to be the "ornamented" model, meaning that it has superior veneers. I fell on my feet with this, because it is a gorgeous instrument both visually and musically. It is a good date - the casework looks backwards to the elegance of English Georgian furniture, while the action incorporates the latest technical developments and looks forward. A friend of mine said "you should play Haydn on this", and so I did - it has been a voyage of discovery. The music sounds so wonderful on this instrument of the correct period. Its delicacy and clarity mean that everything is exposed - micro-detailed control of phrasing and articulation are possible and this presents a considerable challenge. Here is a picture - more pictures here.

[Linked Image]

At this point the dreaded Piano Acquisition Syndrome set in. In this context it is sometimes known as the Square Piano Bug. These early square pianos are so delightful, and so different from each other, that they are highly collectable. Broadwoods, Clementis, Ganers, Stodarts have differences both visual and aural. And technical development was so rapid that pianos of 1805 sound different from those of 1795, while those of 1815 sound different again. So another nice instrument can be very difficult to resist.

Severe temptation came when sadly most of the Finchcocks collection was sold by auction in 2016. The Stodart square (picture above) was part of my personal piano history, and I very much wanted to to buy it. But for various reasons (long story) I dropped out of the bidding - and afterwards had non-buyer's remorse.

Another opportunity came in 2018, when one of the most pre-eminent collections of early keyboard instruments in the UK, the Colt Collection, was also sold by auction. Here were further temptations - there was a delightful Erard square of 1804, a couple of gorgeous Clementi squares, and much more... It was suggested to me that perhaps I should consider a grand - and the idea of an early Broadwood did appeal very much. The Colt was an extraordinary collection - it had 14 Broadwood grand pianos dating from 1787 to 1827. These clearly demonstrated the development of the piano during this period; this collection should have been kept in a museum. As it was, here was a never-to-be-repeated opportunity to select an early Broadwood grand.

I decided to be more purposeful and focussed than in the Finchcocks sale, and was very pleased to be successful on two items.

The first was the Erard square of 1804. Extremely elegant and delightful. In its latter years the Colt collection was sadly neglected, and many of the pianos became unplayable. But this Erard still played nicely, if rather of of tune, at the auction viewing. However, transport home proved to be the last straw for many of the leather hammer hinges, which came unglued. It is now in a restoration workshop - it is altogether in pretty good condition, so there is not a lot to do. I am greatly looking forward to its coming home. Here it is with the lid open; you can't see all the elegance of the decoration.

[Linked Image]

The other was the third oldest Broadwood in the collection, dating from 1797. The length is 7' 6". Like the Erard (and my Broadwood square) it has 5 1/2 octaves, so is more slender than a modern grand - and also being about a foot lower than a modern grand, it fits nicely into my piano room without being too visually dominant. The case is a beautiful flame (?) mahogany, slightly reddish in colour. Importantly, the piano has very little twist - twist in the case tends to be a feature of these old pianos and harpsichords, due to the tension of the strings acting on the wooden structure for two centuries. It does have one major problem - the wrest plank will require major work. At the moment only one note sounds like a note! But otherwise it is in pretty good condition. Restoration is scheduled, but is prevented at the moment by the "lockdown" - the removers are not allowed to operate. It will be enormously exciting to have it home and working. It is very handsome!

[Linked Image]

This is the piano which impressed Haydn when he came to London, and which inspired his late sonatas. You can hear the finale of Hob. XVI/52 played by Sylvia Berry on a Broadwood similar to mine, here. I am expecting my Broadwood to sound something like this when restored. I love this recording - it is clear, fresh, exciting. If only I could play like that...

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Wow, that’s quite a story, thank you for sharing it!

How do you fit all those instruments in your house??


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Thank you David,
That Broadwood is it similar to Mozart's piano that we see in his Vienna apartment?
(I am not sure if the piano was in the house in Salzburg or Vienna ?)
From what remember Mozart loved the Stein piano.
Also I think there was a difference in tone between those made in England (like the Clementi) to those made in Vienna like the Stein.
Perhaps I am muddled ? This piano was made just a few years after Mozart died in 1790.
I enjoyed the recording of the Haydn sonata, but had to listen with "new ears" to something that old .
The pianos of today have the plush sound ,so very different.

I once looked up to see if the Broadwood factory was still there, and there was just this tower left
standing.That was a few years ago when we owned an old Broadwood. (not as ancient as yours)
However now I cannot seem to find the image.
Actually these are amazing pictures !

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Thank you David, your post is fascinating. I particularly like - and identify with 'Piano Acquisition Syndrome' although I'm down to two pianos from five (Three grands and two squares).


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Originally Posted by Squarepianolover
Thank you David, your post is fascinating. I particularly like - and identify with 'Piano Acquisition Syndrome' although I'm down to two pianos from five (Three grands and two squares).

I hope at least one of the pianos is a square!

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Originally Posted by David-G
I thought my piano journey might be of interest because it is a bit different - because I have developed an interest in early instruments.

Thanks for sharing!


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A very interesting thread and particularly difficult to reach... smile

My short list:

1. Essenfelder 137 upright (1974) - sold

2. Steinway K-52 upright(1958) - sold

3. Halben 132 upright, a pristine Fritz Dobbert brand, now extinct (1946) - sold

4. C. Bechstein Concert 8 upright (1921 / renovated 2020)

5. Sauter V 182 grand (1982)

6. (In wishful thinking mode, my dream piano to be added to this list: a brand new grand like an Omega Sauter 220 or a Bösendorfer 214/225 VC models)

Note: I have never had digitals. I just don't have fun with them...

Last edited by Fluxo; 07/29/20 09:20 AM.

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Originally Posted by terminaldegree
9. new Shigeru Kawai SK-6L in 2015, sold in 2019.
10. new Kawai ES8 digital in 2018, still in the family.
11. new Schimmel K230 grand in 2019, sitting in my living room.

terminaldegree, can you fill us in on what made you decide to replace the SK-6L with K230? Both are wonderful instruments, the K230 is a littler bigger, sure. Are there other reasons? Thanks.

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