2022 our 25th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
39 members (Burkhard, Carey, brennbaer, 0day, Alex Hutor, AndrewJCW, 8 invisible), 723 guests, and 228 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 50
Notori Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 50
Hi all! I was wondering what your thoughts are on adult beginners skipping exam levels/difficulty levels? Do you think that, even though we're adults, it's still smart to go through things in order so as to not do too much too fast? Or is it okay to jump to more difficult or "advanced" pieces because as adults we're better at knowing how to learn things and have more patience for perfecting one piece (vs a child who wants to do new things all the time)?

I'm a bit torn for myself. I always wanted to do my RCM exams in order because I feel it's important to climb the stairs step by step, so to speak. But now, I'm on RCM level 3 - which is fine - but I'm 30. I want to go to university for music (in history/theory, not performance) and need to prepare an audition with minimum RCM level 9 material. Is it stupid to jump ahead to level 9-10 repertoire for the purposes of my audition? Are the higher levels really THAT much more difficult if enough time and practice is given?

Personally, for the sake of attending university, I'm now realizing that if I did all the grades in order, it would take me years before hitting level 9 - but I'd learn more pieces gradually. OR, I could instead spend a year and a bit perfecting the 3-5 audition pieces that are a higher level.

Just curious what different opinions are on this and the pros and cons to each side, or if anyone's been in a similar situation. Especially if it's your first time going to university at all as someone 30+.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,010
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,010
Originally Posted by Notori
Hi all! I was wondering what your thoughts are on adult beginners skipping exam levels/difficulty levels? Do you think that, even though we're adults, it's still smart to go through things in order so as to not do too much too fast? Or is it okay to jump to more difficult or "advanced" pieces because as adults we're better at knowing how to learn things and have more patience for perfecting one piece (vs a child who wants to do new things all the time)?
[...]

This part of your post shows that impatience is not limited to children! Without the experience of several years of study, what convinces you that "...adults [are] better at knowing how to learn things and have more patience...." It really seems as though you are contradicting yourself; you want to jump ahead to meet audition demands and yet you believe that, as an adult, you have the patience for perfecting. The two are mutually exclusive.

If you have a good teacher who can guide you well there is no great disadvantage to skipping the occasional exam grade between levels 3 and 9 (RCM), but to go from level 3 to level 9 seems to me a plan that is almost doomed to fail unless you have several years to do it. The technical demands between the two levels are vast and, in my opinion, most people can't develop the required technique between the two levels in a single bound. All the interpretive skills that are developed over several years studying different composers and different styles also require time to develop.

I don't see how it's reasonable to assume that from level 3, one can start working on Bach Three-Part Inventions, Beethoven, Haydn, or Mozart Sonata movements as well as intermediate Romantic repertoire from the likes of Chopin, Brahms, Schumann, Tchaikovsky, without having established the in-between technical base and musical experience required to perform the examination successfully.

Do you need to be reminded (from the RCM piano syllabus, 2015, p. 72): At Level 9, Baroque contrapuntal works, larger-scale Classical sonata movements, and etudes and character pieces from the Romantic and contemporary periods all serve as effective vehicles for pianistic development. Technical requirements in a wide range of keys reflect the increasing demands of the repertoire.

I am sure that there are some who will say: "Give it a try; what have you got to lose?" I would caution you against putting too much hope in such a plan.

The final and inevitable question: What does your teacher say?

Regards,


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,048
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,048
For me I was wondering if you can jump to level 9/10 why are you doing anything level 3? If I was a level 9/10 pianist I wouldn’t spend time taking level 3,4,etc just for the sake of taking them.

Can you learn 3-4 level 9/10 pieces in a year and play them well? I have no idea what that entails.

I’m no expert but sounds like you’re already a very advanced pianist and don’t need to spend time in lower grades so I’d say go for it. Whatever route you choose good luck with it!

Joined: May 2015
Posts: 11,256
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 11,256
What will it get you if you can mimic 3-4 high level pieces for an audition? It will get you 3-; pieces only but no skill set to play other advanced music or other music that requires technique you have not learned. This is adult impatience rather than the child-like, more effective of ‘one day, one-skill at a time.
You are making too many assumptions about the advantages of being an adult in learning the piano.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,632
L
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,632
I don't think you are even allowed to do that. From memory after level VI you have to do every exam.

If you are level III now, the chances of you reaching level IX within a year are slim to none.


When you play, never mind who listens to you. R.Schumann.

Casio GP-400

2006 August Förster 215
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 487
W
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
W
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 487
This is what I would do: contact one of the people at the university who supervises the auditions, tell them what you want to study and ask how you should prepare. Probably for audition there would be a panel including the keyboard studies professor and the theory/composition professor. You won't be auditioning for piano performance, but you'll need to show some proficiency and understanding in the score. Some departments offer degrees in musicology, commercial music production, music business. I can't imagine they expect all of those students to be technically great instrumentalists.

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Originally Posted by Notori
I'm 30. I want to go to university for music (in history/theory, not performance) and need to prepare an audition with minimum RCM level 9 material. Is it stupid to jump ahead to level 9-10 repertoire for the purposes of my audition? Are the higher levels really THAT much more difficult if enough time and practice is given?

This is what you've just posted in another thread:
Originally Posted by Notori
I finally memorized the Biehl Sonatina in A Minor! I don't know why but this piece felt beyond impossible to me for so long. It was so weird. The other Level 3 pieces were, well, challenging for sure but decent. This Sonatina though. Something would just NOT click in my brain. I was even considering changing my List B piece because I genuinely believed I *couldn't* play it. But then I thought it WAS listed as grade 3. Really I should be able to practice any piece in this level and do it because that's my level. If I gave up and switched this one it would mean I'd be lacking something going forward. So I kept at it. SUPER slowly. Bar by bar. Double the time devoted to it as my other pieces. And I finally reached the end. It's not perfectly memorized yet, but I can play it the whole way through. It feels so good to have persevered
Sorry, but that shows you're normal, not a wunderkind, nor a musical freak.

Which is to say, attempting to learn RCM level 9 pieces at your present standard is doomed to failure and frustration. It also shows you have no idea how much more difficult pieces at that level are, compared to what you're learning now.

You definitely need a few more years of dedicated learning and practicing. There is really no point in running before you can walk without falling over.

BTW, it's always adults who are impatient to "progress" quickly, rather than kids. Kids tend to take things as they come, especially so if they're learning with good teachers. They leave it to their teachers to dictate the pace of their learning.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 9,824
9000 Post Club Member
Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 9,824
Originally Posted by Notori
Hi all! I was wondering what your thoughts are on adult beginners skipping exam levels/difficulty levels? Do you think that, even though we're adults, it's still smart to go through things in order so as to not do too much too fast? Or is it okay to jump to more difficult or "advanced" pieces because as adults we're better at knowing how to learn things and have more patience for perfecting one piece (vs a child who wants to do new things all the time)?

I'm a bit torn for myself. I always wanted to do my RCM exams in order because I feel it's important to climb the stairs step by step, so to speak. But now, I'm on RCM level 3 - which is fine - but I'm 30. I want to go to university for music (in history/theory, not performance) and need to prepare an audition with minimum RCM level 9 material. Is it stupid to jump ahead to level 9-10 repertoire for the purposes of my audition? Are the higher levels really THAT much more difficult if enough time and practice is given?
Why can't you do both? Climb step by step and move a little faster than one level a year? I'm hoping to take the RCM level 6 exam at the end of this year, and I started at a zero level 26 months ago. I think you can skip some of the exams though, that's what I'm doing. But I think you have to cover the material (material, pieces, scales, exercises, techniques, etc.). You can't skip that stuff.


[Linked Image]
across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,010
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,010
Originally Posted by Sebs
For me I was wondering if you can jump to level 9/10 why are you doing anything level 3? If I was a level 9/10 pianist I wouldn’t spend time taking level 3,4,etc just for the sake of taking them.

[...]

In a recent post, the OP indicated that s/he was having some difficulty with Level 3 pieces. It is evident that the OP has not yet advanced beyond Level 3. Based on that, the OP is not "a level 9/10 pianist."

Regards,


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,010
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,010
Originally Posted by Learux
I don't think you are even allowed to do that. From memory after level VI you have to do every exam.

[...]

I can find no evidence in the syllabus that there are pre-requisites to any practical examination except for the diploma level ARCT. For the ARCT, the Level 10 comprehensive examination (which means including having completed the theory requirements) is a pre-requisite.

Regards,


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 50
Notori Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 50
Yikes...

I just meant to pose some hypothetical discussion questions about an interesting topic using myself as one possible example... Y'all came for me real quick. My bad for asking I guess.

Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,651
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 2,651
Originally Posted by Notori
Yikes...
Yikes? I don't see anybody having been unfriendly to you. Just giving you honest answers.

I have tried to learn pieces that were above my level, even pieces that were way above my level. For instance, I have tried to learn the first four measures of Beethoven's Pathétique when I was still basically a level one student with poor technique skills at that. After a period of struggling with those measures, enjoying myself less and less, I just started practising other things instead.
So my advice would be, give yourself this experience. Chose a difficult phrase from a level 9 piece, and try to learn it. What do you think? Is it doable? Are you up to the struggle? In that case, good luck and please let us know how it is going. smile

Animisha


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
*
... feeling like the pianist on the Titanic ...
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Originally Posted by Notori
Yikes...

I just meant to pose some hypothetical discussion questions about an interesting topic using myself as one possible example... Y'all came for me real quick.
Probably because you obviously haven't done any basic research before you posed that question - like looking up the requirements for RCM 9, and checking out a few pieces of that level on IMSLP, or even just listening to YT recordings of them. Also, you made some assumptions that "as adults we're better at knowing how to learn things and have more patience for perfecting one piece (vs a child who wants to do new things all the time)" and then this: "Are the higher levels really THAT much more difficult if enough time and practice is given?"

For instance, this is a RCM level 9 piece:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-QoJaKaMog

And this is the score (on page 96): https://ks.imslp.net/files/imglnks/...ME_1_Broude_03_Nouvelles_Suites_scan.pdf

What do you think?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,413
S
3000 Post Club Member
Online Content
3000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3,413
Originally Posted by Notori
Hi all! I was wondering what your thoughts are on adult beginners skipping exam levels/difficulty levels? Do you think that, even though we're adults, it's still smart to go through things in order so as to not do too much too fast?

I want to go to university for music (in history/theory, not performance) and need to prepare an audition with minimum RCM level 9 material. Is it stupid to jump ahead to level 9-10 repertoire for the purposes of my audition? Are the higher levels really THAT much more difficult if enough time and practice is given?

Personally, for the sake of attending university, I'm now realizing that if I did all the grades in order, it would take me years before hitting level 9 - but I'd learn more pieces gradually. OR, I could instead spend a year and a bit perfecting the 3-5 audition pieces that are a higher level.

I think it is fine to ask the question, but you are confusing levels and the time necessary to learn the content of the levels. So level 9 is definitely much more difficult than level 3. There is really no possible comparison. If you are really at level 3 now, there is no way you could play a level 9 piece at the required level of performance. The question is not really to go in order, the only question is how much time you will need to develop the skills. There is no particular need to formerly take every single level. You can skip one or 2. Why dont you just try out with pieces at level 5 and see how it works out. Some people learn faster than others and the amount of daily practice time plays a big role too.

But what you should make sure is that you cover the content necessary to master level 9.


Blüthner model 6
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 89
C
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 89
Originally Posted by Notori
Yikes...

I just meant to pose some hypothetical discussion questions about an interesting topic using myself as one possible example... Y'all came for me real quick. My bad for asking I guess.

While I'm not preparing for exams, I found your question and also the answers on this thread to be informative. The topic applies to me because I often attempt to learn music that exceeds my current level.

I think the people responding to you were just being honest and not "coming after you". If you post a question/topic, be prepared for honest feedback.


[Linked Image]
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,380
J
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,380
Originally Posted by Notori
Yikes...

I just meant to pose some hypothetical discussion questions about an interesting topic using myself as one possible example... Y'all came for me real quick. My bad for asking I guess.
No, it's a good question Notori.

My opinion on the matter is based upon what I observe is that the RCM curriculum and going the whole nine yards would be extremely valuable for children as they are developing. (Literally as their brains are developing). Learning technical skills, scales, arpeggios when you are young ingrains in the brains of children in a way that doesn't happen at the same level as when you are learning these same skills as an adult. These skills happen in a way that ingrains them into child's brain and motor memory in a way that will never happen in an adult. When we learn these skills they are acquired. When children learn these skills they are ingrained which makes them second nature for them to execute.

So to answer your question. I think if you are going to university it would be important that- in your case- to go through all the levels to make sure you have the foundational theoretical knowledge necessary to major in music theory and history and that may be why the school makes this a requirement. But if you never plan on playing an instrument again, the skill application would not really matter. It is interesting that you want to go to music school but I assume don't play an instrument. If you want to learn composition I think half decent keyboard skills are a prerequisite.

I think for adult learners taking up piano as a hobby learning under the RCM curriculum (as I understand it from studying the syllabus) is a nice way to organize and test one's learning but I honestly don't think it's an absolute requirement to learn how to play the piano and play the piano well. I think for adult learners it is important to have a frank conversation with your teacher and make sure he/she has an understanding of what your goals are. If you are like me and you only want to learn and handful of very difficult pieces but be able to teach yourself any intermediate level pieces (classical, pop, jazz, show themes etc...) and eventually play them well enough for an amateur going through all those exercises and tests might just be a big waste of time.

Because these are acquired skills rather than ingrained skills you're just learning them for learning sake but they are not going to become part of you as they would a child and you will have to practice them over and over again or just learn them when you come across them in the music. For example, I don't understand how learning all the scales as and adult is going to make you a better player. Unless you want to spend every few days going over each of those scales it's kind of a waste of time for an adult. For a child who is expected to play at high level and wants to pursue it as a career I could understand why you would want to make sure these scales are ingrained in their brains when they are young so when they come across them in their music it is second nature for them. Almost all my piano teachers who play and teach at the highest caliber learned scales as a child but none of them practice them as an adult.

So my point being- you don't have to go through RCM or these other test based schools of learning to become a proficient amateur adult pianist. No reason to rack your brains over it. You do have to learn the fundamentals though- how to read music, understand time signatures, and understanding the markings on the page. It's also a good idea to have been taught a few scales up and down a few octaves just to learn the mechanics of finger movement, but again I question the value of learning all of them. I think there are just so many assumptions about what must be done to become a decent pianist but there are other ways to get there without all these tests and exercises. In the Bach and Beethoven's time there was no RCM, didn't they learn from mostly playing music? Most of us are just learning this as a hobby and have our careers taking up most of our time so why add more stress with all these examinations?

I learned how to play the piano almost exclusively by playing music and most of those years were self taught. I didn't learn scales, arpeggios, nor take any music tests ever in my life. I had some basic organ lessons on a Lowry Organ at age 5 but those lessons are very different from RCM curriculum. It was just basic stuff life learning the staffs, learning time signatures and gradually being introduced to all the markings on the page. We learned chords with our left hand and the bass notes were done with our feet. I only learned 1 octave scales. I probably only know a handful of scales by memory to this day. (Like what? five scales- and all major) Music appreciation was a requirement in my high school and I learned the clarinet in 4 years and played for our high school concert band. I believe I also took level 1 music theory college and I did well, but I think I forgot most of it.

Don't get me wrong. I WISH, absolutely WISH, I was taught under the RCM school and went through all the testing as a CHILD, but as an adult without professional aspirations I think it has limited usefulness and there is no guarantee that just going through all the levels will make you a good musician. I think- again my opinion- the fastest way to learn for adults who only want to do this as a hobby (and have limited time) is to do RCM to the point that you have a fundamental grasp of how to read music, understand time signatures and then focus a lot on the music YOU want to learn. You will the theory, scales, arpeggios and other techniques as you pick progressively more difficult music. But most importantly you will enjoy the journey more. Today I played Busoni's/Bach Chaconne for my teacher. I think it went rather well and at an appropriate fast tempo. She liked my performance and she's not one to hand out compliments when it's not warranted. A topic on another thread inspired me to get moving to polish this piece. Look at all the scales, arpeggios, technical requirements in this piece. Now don't get me wrong, I have work to do on this piece (especially those scales- but I can do them nicely when I actually work on them) but if RCM levels are required to play this piece, how am I able to do even one page let alone the whole piece when I'm at RCM level 0. I didn't know any of these scales or techniques. All I did was learn the technique and scales as I came across them with the help of an excellent teacher. I looked it up, apparently a piece like this is diploma level. BTW I don't consider myself by any stretch of the imagination a musical wunderkind and I know I have a lot still to learn and look forward to it but I don't think an RCM type curriculum is required it's just assumed.


This is Kissin playing by the way, not me.

Last edited by Jethro; 07/25/20 10:43 PM.
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 240
O
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
O
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 240
I didn't ask the question but the last poster above me answered probably a dozen or more questions I have swirling around my head. Talk about positive and valuable post even for beginner lurker. Thank you sir.


Yamaha P-515
In the market for an acoustic grand.
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,380
J
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,380
Originally Posted by onaiplatigid
I didn't ask the question but the last poster above me answered probably a dozen or more questions I have swirling around my head. Talk about positive and valuable post even for beginner lurker. Thank you sir.
I'm glad it helped Onaiplatigid, but I also don't want to confuse people or advise people wrongly. I learned this way over a period of 40 years and lot's hard work (thousands of hours) and eventually good teaching. My point being is that there is more than one way to get there. It doesn't have to be a strict curriculum based education.

Last edited by Jethro; 07/25/20 11:11 PM.
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,380
J
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,380
Also I want to make it clear so as not to mislead. There is a natural progression to learning. So if you have children it is best that they follow the curriculum and skipping levels is not advised. If you are an adult understand RCM is just a roadmap. But there are many maps to get there. The RCM curriculum for adults can be used as a guide, but a loose guide and exams are entirely unnecessary unless you want to take them or take them to keep you disciplined. But I'm just advising that in my opinion and experience you may be better served focusing more on the music which is what I assume you enjoy as much as I do and try to learn your technique and theory as you play more pieces. But if all your time is devoted learning scales, test material, theory, instead of playing music I think you are wasting some time especially if you are losing motivation or not having fun doing it. I always suggest a teacher and this would probably be a good thing to discuss with him/her.

Last edited by Jethro; 07/25/20 11:44 PM.
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
Originally Posted by Notori
Is it stupid to jump ahead to level 9-10 repertoire for the purposes of my audition?

Yes, very stupid.

Originally Posted by Notori
Are the higher levels really THAT much more difficult if enough time and practice is given?

Yes, they are really THAT much more difficult.

Originally Posted by Notori
Personally, for the sake of attending university, I'm now realizing that if I did all the grades in order, it would take me years before hitting level 9 - but I'd learn more pieces gradually. OR, I could instead spend a year and a bit perfecting the 3-5 audition pieces that are a higher level.

Maybe you should look into a different degree program? Or a different school that doesn't require such a high level of piano proficiency from a non-piano major?


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
Piano Buyer - Read the Articles, Explore the website
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Boston UP-118S opinions
by skern49 - 08/08/22 10:22 PM
OT-ish: what kind of Yamaha is this?
by ShiroKuro - 08/08/22 06:53 PM
Crack on soundboard
by phucahwa - 08/08/22 05:43 PM
Cage:Sonatas and Interludes
by pianoloverus - 08/08/22 05:31 PM
Bluetooth Pedal - page turner
by danno858 - 08/08/22 04:00 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
What's Hot!!
FREE June Newsletter is Here!
--------------------
Forums RULES, Terms of Service & HELP
(updated 06/06/2022)
-------------------
Music Store Going Out of Business Sale!
---------------------
Mr. PianoWorld's Original Composition
---------------------
Sell Your Piano on our world famous Piano Forums!
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums43
Topics214,303
Posts3,214,910
Members106,036
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2022 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5