2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
46 members (CyberGene, 3x4rt, Dazzie2, Greta99, 36251, EVC2017, BachToTheFuture, donpi, iliverez, 9 invisible), 396 guests, and 410 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Re: Chopin Ballade 4
22138 #2982739 05/23/20 09:38 AM
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 651
B
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
B
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 651
Originally Posted by 22138
Hello, I am currently practicing Chopin's ballade in f minor. My teacher said I should try to play without the coda and then we would re-evaluate whether I would be ready for the whole piece. It took me about 2 months to get where I am now and it sounds pretty decent. Due to the lockdown I can't see my teacher anymore and I wanted to ask whether you guys think I should tackle the coda or not, given that it took me about 2 months to be able to play the rest of the piece

I always find questions like this puzzling. Like, what is the harm of attempting the coda and failing? It’s not a life or death situation. If you try it and can’t do it, you’ve probably still gained something. There is no consequence of trying to play something and failing.

Re: Chopin Ballade 4
boo1234 #2982772 05/23/20 11:31 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 28,126
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 28,126
Originally Posted by boo1234
I always find questions like this puzzling. Like, what is the harm of attempting the coda and failing? It’s not a life or death situation. If you try it and can’t do it, you’ve probably still gained something. There is no consequence of trying to play something and failing.
Of course it's not life or death but OTOH one has spent a lot of time and still cannot perform the piece. One cannot even play it for oneself unless one is satisfied with a substandard performance. One has certainly gained something but I think the important question is if one would have gained a lot more studying a piece one could complete to an acceptable level.

Re: Chopin Ballade 4
22138 #2984104 05/26/20 10:26 AM
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,008
D
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,008
Start working on it. It's not like your first go around with a piece like this is going to be your final word on it. Even if it's not perfect, it doesn't matter. You come back to it in a year or two or ten and refine it.

Re: Chopin Ballade 4
DanS #2984158 05/26/20 12:21 PM
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 37
L
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
L
Joined: May 2019
Posts: 37
This is what I’ve done with the first ballade. I started it as a teenager and played it absolutely horribly to no one other than myself and my teacher, and over the years picked it up again here and there. I think around the third time of asking I was able to play the whole thing to a pretty good level (Coda included).

It doesn’t matter if it’s not perfect or below tempo, as you can come back to it later if needs be after having practiced other things (e.g. struggling with the arpeggios of the coda? Study op 25 no 12 for a bit and then they work like magic, etc etc).

This isn’t to say study other things for the sake of learning the ballade - study them for whatever reason it may be and you’ll find that after leaving it rest for a bit after having worked hard at it for a few months and it’ll become easier and easier.

You might also find that the coda looks and sounds a lot more scary to play than it actually is - you never know until you try!

Re: Chopin Ballade 4
lbuizza #2984327 05/26/20 07:02 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 63
C
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 63
Originally Posted by lbuizza
You might also find that the coda looks and sounds a lot more scary to play than it actually is - you never know until you try!

Ha. I tried it once and it jolly well didn't :-)

Re: Chopin Ballade 4
22138 #2985152 05/28/20 07:34 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 104
C
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 104
I’m currently working on Ballade four, have also played Ballade one, and you may notice my screen name is coda9... I relish any opportunity to learn and play codas of Chopin. They’re stunning masterworks! Maybe we should open up a separate thread on this topic”codas of Chopin?”

I have a few questions for the original poster 22138, as we don’t seem to have a background of this pianist’s playing familiarity with big works of Chopin. That might help us to respond to his original question.

1. What other Ballades, Scherzos, polonaises, technically demanding/expressively challenging Works of Chopin have you previously studied/Learned?

2. Did you personally select Chopin’s Ballade 4 as a piece of music you very much want to learn? Or did your teacher recommend you to learn this Ballade?

3. Is there a time limit in which you need to complete learning this piece for an exam or event of public playing?

These questions are respectfully queried to understand your concern of time limit.


I guess I’m confused as to why any pianist would be concerned about a time limit in learning one of the most glorious enriching heartfelt works of Chopin...! Even if you don’t finish learning the piece at performance level, surely you can sense the irresistible force of this master work.

Re: Chopin Ballade 4
22138 #2987147 06/02/20 06:30 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 3,039
D
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 3,039
if you start the thread on codas of Chopin I will try to be the first one to contribute, what a good idea!


Longtemps, je me suis couché de bonne heure, but not anymore!
Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Karsten Collection
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Our October 2020 Free Piano Newsletter is Here!
---------------------
3,000,000+!
------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Estonia L225 loses tune very quickly
by M_albert - 10/20/20 01:49 AM
Piano Safari Christmas collection
by ebonykawai - 10/19/20 08:59 PM
Another "beginner" piece w/twist
by MilesAbbott - 10/19/20 08:58 PM
Sostenuto Pedal....in an upright?
by Duaner - 10/19/20 06:38 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics202,315
Posts3,015,360
Members98,949
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4