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Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977515 05/10/20 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by J.Kennedy
Honestly, I need to either get through to my teacher or switch.

If you do decide to change teachers ....

You may wish to take a small vacation and just play for fun for a while and forget about "improving" .... just play stuff you can play and enjoy it. Perform for friends or family for fun. Something like that.

Try to remove the pressure of keeping up the pace.

Good Luck


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Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977681 05/11/20 01:54 AM
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I have discovered that people need to stop expecting to improve from simply learning piece after piece after piece which simply takes far too long and rarely yields any gains, and actually look up and start learning technical exercises along with proper posture and finger technique. There are countless free videos on YouTube full of knowledge that no piano teacher will ever teach you because they themselves cannot even play well in the first place nor know about proper technique, as well as written guides all over the internet.

At the absolute minimum is learning Hanon exercises properly and as written playing from each of the fingertips. Furthermore is transposing them into 5 finger patterns in any scale / chromatic. Learning chords and arpeggios, literally just sitting there and playing and finding weaknesses and training those weaknesses. Most importantly is to do them carefully and slowly / gently. But if you're worried about any potential damage from exercises / warm ups, then how can you expect to actually play pieces? You can't become a footballer without doing any stretches or exercises, learning the piano is no different. If you're worried about these things being too boring to learn, the alternative is to continue to remain stuck at whatever technical level you are currently at, for !e that was needing to spend almost a full year just to learn a single piece.

Also it is important to train your reading as well, but no teacher actually does much other than simply hand you piles of score music and expect you to magically read it all yourself. If you cannot self motivate to do this yourself then nothing else is going to help.

A big reason why people may feel burnout while learning is the consistently poor or non existent levels of teaching they have encountered. Today with access to YouTube and the internet it is more important than ever to obtain this information yourself. I find nothing more motivating than watching pianists on YouTube and wanting to be able to do what they do. But simply obtaining the sheet music and sitting to learn it isn't all that it takes. You need to be developing technical training and exercises to be able to play properly. Simply going through whichever school of grades 1-8 doesn't develop that, in fact graded exercises do not factor in any semblance or understanding of proper finger and hand development.


'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977709 05/11/20 03:43 AM
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Bhav
Since you have never taken a lesson from a piano teacher, you do not have the experience or qualifications to discuss what most piano teachers do or don’t do nor evaluate the quality of teaching.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Getting through Burnout
dogperson #2977710 05/11/20 03:48 AM
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Originally Posted by dogperson
Bhav
Since you have never taken a lesson from a piano teacher, you do not have the experience or qualifications to discuss what most piano teachers do or don’t do nor evaluate the quality of teaching.

The person that came to my school to teach me was a piano teacher, and when I tried asked for help from what teachers I had at university none helped me, so stop trying to use your over privilege of having had access to any such teachers to dismiss my statements.

Also I do have the qualifications for this actually, and qualifications are still not at all mandatory for anything to do with teaching piano.

If as you say, music and piano teachers are two different things, gaining a music qualification does not qualify one to teach piano.

Also feel free to read this and maybe educate yourself https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/27/music-lessons-children-white-wealthy

'I know this because I struggled enormously to read notation as a child, meaning that my enthusiasm for music was not registered at primary level. At secondary school, I was fortunate enough to have a teacher who picked up on my passion. One day he pulled me aside, and said “you like music, don’t you?” before throwing me into two choirs, as well as singing and piano lessons. I learned Mozart, West Side Story and can now sing in Latin, German and Italian, eventually getting my grade 8.

Still, I cannot sight read. This is something that means I cannot join the many choirs around the UK that name this as a requirement. The patterns and figures of music don’t easily unravel in my mind. I suspect that’s the case for many other children and adults; some get notation, others don’t. Neither is indicative of talent, but while we do not find lateral, inclusive ways to engage people – as well as loosening our ideas of what constitutes musical ability – we are losing masses of would-be performers'

Now do quit trying to use the fact that I DIDN'T EVEN HAVE ACCESS TO the education that I would have required as a means to try and silence my statements.

Last edited by Bhav; 05/11/20 03:53 AM.

'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977714 05/11/20 04:01 AM
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you had a music teacher that came to your school and taught a group lesson of 30 students after school —- music and not Piano. This is not the same thing as a private piano lessons and your expectation of what should’ve been done is not reasonable. Please stop this rant which you repeat over and over.

Ah, now you assert for the first time you had piano lessons ? Guess you can no longer claim to be self-taught like you love to do.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Getting through Burnout
dogperson #2977715 05/11/20 04:08 AM
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Originally Posted by dogperson
you had a music teacher that came to your school and taught a group lesson of 30 students after school —- music and not Piano. This is not the same thing as a private piano lessons and your expectation of what should’ve been done is not reasonable. Please stop this rant which you repeat over and over.

Ah, now you assert for the first time you had piano lessons ? Guess you can no longer claim to be self-taught like you love to do.

Why do you even care so much about me? Looks like I already have haters.

You speak exactly from a level of jealousy, as though someone who is 'less academically learned' than you cannot know anything. Your self acclaimed and belief in any position of authority you think you have is entirely meaningless.

The only thing I am having to repeatedly do is dismiss your inaccurate misinterpretations of anything that I have said.

Very simply, how does it even matter in the slightest to you what lessons or education I myself have or haven't had in something that anybody can simply pick up and learn themselves from the age of 5 or maybe even less?

Experience is significantly more valuable than education and I've been doing this for well over 20 years now, after subtracting the time I couldn't play due to injury.

Last edited by Bhav; 05/11/20 04:13 AM.

'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977717 05/11/20 04:16 AM
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I don’t want any future members or anyone reading these posts as a new pianists to think having a teacher is worthless based on what you write. I have read all of your historical forum posts and I hope others will do the same if they are thinking about taking your pronouncements credibly.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Getting through Burnout
Bhav #2977718 05/11/20 04:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Bhav
Originally Posted by dogperson
Bhav
Since you have never taken a lesson from a piano teacher, you do not have the experience or qualifications to discuss what most piano teachers do or don’t do nor evaluate the quality of teaching.

The person that came to my school to teach me was a piano teacher, and when I tried asked for help from what teachers I had at university none helped me, so stop trying to use your over privilege of having had access to any such teachers to dismiss my statements.

Also I do have the qualifications for this actually, and qualifications are still not at all mandatory for anything to do with teaching piano.

If as you say, music and piano teachers are two different things, gaining a music qualification does not qualify one to teach piano.

Also feel free to read this and maybe educate yourself https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/27/music-lessons-children-white-wealthy

'I know this because I struggled enormously to read notation as a child, meaning that my enthusiasm for music was not registered at primary level. At secondary school, I was fortunate enough to have a teacher who picked up on my passion. One day he pulled me aside, and said “you like music, don’t you?” before throwing me into two choirs, as well as singing and piano lessons. I learned Mozart, West Side Story and can now sing in Latin, German and Italian, eventually getting my grade 8.

Still, I cannot sight read. This is something that means I cannot join the many choirs around the UK that name this as a requirement. The patterns and figures of music don’t easily unravel in my mind. I suspect that’s the case for many other children and adults; some get notation, others don’t. Neither is indicative of talent, but while we do not find lateral, inclusive ways to engage people – as well as loosening our ideas of what constitutes musical ability – we are losing masses of would-be performers'

Now do quit trying to use the fact that I DIDN'T EVEN HAVE ACCESS TO the education that I would have required as a means to try and silence my statements.

Quoted article is writeen by some lazy guy who would like to play something but it's extremely hard for him. You know, you can be a piano genius but still cook like 5-year old and nothing wrong with it. We all have different talents, and there are things that our braing are taking fast or are almost imposible to teach. Music definitely is the latter for him.

Music notation is not university level mathematic formula, but extremely simple thing which takes 2 short evenings to learn with the keyboard. Yes, it's much more complicated to learn on string instruments, but still.
When I hear or read that notes are so complicated, my head just goes to explode. You learned english, which took you thousands of hours more to learn than the notes. There just some stupid idea spread that music notation is 1. not needed 2. compliated.

So, firstly, yes, its needed, second, its very simple. If you are an amateur and want to play simple things as a hobby do do not need to understand all in-depth notation nuances, which are written in virtuoso pieces. All easy songs use the very basic things, like legato and staccato marks, dynamic and that's all.

Being a great musican and not being able to read notes (which is the very common and false myth), is like being the great storyteller, but not being able to read or write any other story.

Again, it takes half on hour to get the needed understanding of notes on a keyboard. Nothing complicated at all.


Another thing is, and the only one in which the author has right, is that classical teacher are learning even the easy classical pieces to perfection, like everyone would need to be a virtuoso. They forget that people want just enjoyment, not work.

Regarding Hanon, it may be a good book, but playing it as written, will only do more harm to you. There is video by Graham Fitch on how the Hanon should be executed, and I think it was n on of the wrist rotation videos. Look on youtube.

Re: Getting through Burnout
dogperson #2977720 05/11/20 04:22 AM
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Originally Posted by dogperson
I don’t want any future members or anyone reading these posts as a new pianists to think having a teacher is worthless based on what you write. I have read all of your historical forum posts and I hope others will do the same if they are thinking about taking your pronouncements credibly.

Oh so spare me your pointless drivel based on yet nothing more than misinterpretations, is English even your first language?

I have stated that anyone on this forum claiming to be a teacher, and any teacher that dismisses Hanon is an idiot and not worth listening to, let alone paying for. Any teacher that simply does nothing but hand their pupils sheet music is an idiot and not worth paying for.

So far I have not come across any examples of 'teachers' actually bothering to make sure their pupils are using correct technique, fingering and development of finger independence. In fact all I repeatedly see is such teachers doing nothing but dismissing the importance of learning how to properly play from your finger tips and training out poor and dangerous technique like what I used to play with.

What is the point in being or getting a teacher if all they do is reinforce their pupils to play with poor and even dangerous technique, and do not do anything, in fact in most cases simply don't even know anything about how to play with and develop correct technique? This is the first thing you should be doing for anyone trying to learn the piano, instead of making them carry on trying to simply learn whatever music you hand them with terrible technique that will only make learning harder and dangerous.

Last edited by Bhav; 05/11/20 04:25 AM.

'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977721 05/11/20 04:28 AM
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Quote
Regarding Hanon, it may be a good book, but playing it as written, will only do more harm to you. There is video by Graham Fitch on how the Hanon should be executed, and I think it was n on of the wrist rotation videos. Look on youtube.

No actually this right here is exactly the problem. Playing Hanon as written and intended is ABSOLUTELY MANDATORY for pupils with POOR TECHNIQUE to iron out and enable them to be able to play CORRECTLY WITH AND FROM THE TIPS OF EACH FINGER!

Anything to the contrary is TERRIBLE ADVICE!

Regarding music notation / reading, my point is that if the number of hours spent teaching English or Maths were equally spent teaching classical music, students would be able to develop full sight reading.

This isn't at all anything to do with being lazy, thousands of people like me who have continuously struggled to sight read and keep on asking for help with learning this never get it. We the people are saying WE WANT PROPER MUSIC LESSONS AND TRAINING NOW!

It takes even less time in fact to simply learn numbers and the alphabet, so why do we need to teach language or maths to anyone?

Last edited by Bhav; 05/11/20 04:33 AM.

'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
Bhav #2977766 05/11/20 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Bhav
At the absolute minimum is learning Hanon exercises properly and as written playing from each of the fingertips.
I have a Hanon book with all the exercises. I tried them for a bit but to be really honest I found them somewhat useless. Not sure if it’s because they really are useless or maybe it’s because I fail to see the value in them due to my inexperience. I did pick a Czerny book (Opus 299?) and liked it more but then forgot about it too and went right back into my repertoire.


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Re: Getting through Burnout
Bhav #2977795 05/11/20 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Bhav
Originally Posted by dogperson
Bhav
Since you have never taken a lesson from a piano teacher, you do not have the experience or qualifications to discuss what most piano teachers do or don’t do nor evaluate the quality of teaching.

The person that came to my school to teach me was a piano teacher, and when I tried asked for help from what teachers I had at university none helped me, so stop trying to use your over privilege of having had access to any such teachers to dismiss my statements.

Also I do have the qualifications for this actually, and qualifications are still not at all mandatory for anything to do with teaching piano.

If as you say, music and piano teachers are two different things, gaining a music qualification does not qualify one to teach piano.

Also feel free to read this and maybe educate yourself https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/27/music-lessons-children-white-wealthy

'I know this because I struggled enormously to read notation as a child, meaning that my enthusiasm for music was not registered at primary level. At secondary school, I was fortunate enough to have a teacher who picked up on my passion. One day he pulled me aside, and said “you like music, don’t you?” before throwing me into two choirs, as well as singing and piano lessons. I learned Mozart, West Side Story and can now sing in Latin, German and Italian, eventually getting my grade 8.

Still, I cannot sight read. This is something that means I cannot join the many choirs around the UK that name this as a requirement. The patterns and figures of music don’t easily unravel in my mind. I suspect that’s the case for many other children and adults; some get notation, others don’t. Neither is indicative of talent, but while we do not find lateral, inclusive ways to engage people – as well as loosening our ideas of what constitutes musical ability – we are losing masses of would-be performers'

Now do quit trying to use the fact that I DIDN'T EVEN HAVE ACCESS TO the education that I would have required as a means to try and silence my statements.
I haven't been active on this forum for almost a year, so I've only encountered a few of your posts. That being said, you are by a country mile the most negative person I've seen on this forum in the 3 years I've attended this place. All you do is attack every method that isn't your own and extrapolate your own experiences to the extreme.

It makes me wonder why you've posted nearly 500 comments here. You clearly don't like it here, as all you do is pick fights with people and repeat the same angry words time after time. You truly remind me of the anti-abortion folks who'll do nothing but stand outside a clinic all day with the sole intention of being nasty and hurtful to others, jamming their opinion, quite vocally, down other people's throat. Perhaps you'll do good to remind yourself of the definition of a forum, which is a meeting or medium where ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged.. That suggests a two-way street!


I've started playing January 2017, Nothing is too easy is where I keep track of my progress.

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Re: Getting through Burnout
Bhav #2977809 05/11/20 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Bhav
Playing Hanon as written and intended is ABSOLUTELY MANDATORY for pupils with POOR TECHNIQUE to iron out and enable them to be able to play CORRECTLY WITH AND FROM THE TIPS OF EACH FINGER!

Anything to the contrary is TERRIBLE ADVICE!

One of my favorite piano books is On Piano Playing by Gyorgy Sandor.

“Since we do not believe in mechanical practicing, we recommend eliminating most studies that feature technique and not music (Hanon, Pischna, Czerny). Exercises and technical studies that employ certain technical patterns repetitiously tend to lead us to mechanical practicing. It is much more productive to assimilate a technical formula in its purest form and, when it is learned correctly, to employ it at once in a musical composition by adapting it to the specific demands of the piece. The piano repertoire is so immense - there is so much to learn - that it is foolish to spend time with inferior music when the same technical development can be achieved with great music.”

Why play Hanon or Czerny when you can play Scarlatti?


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Re: Getting through Burnout
JJHLH #2977860 05/11/20 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by JJHLH
Originally Posted by Bhav
Playing Hanon as written and intended is ABSOLUTELY MANDATORY for pupils with POOR TECHNIQUE to iron out and enable them to be able to play CORRECTLY WITH AND FROM THE TIPS OF EACH FINGER!

Anything to the contrary is TERRIBLE ADVICE!

One of my favorite piano books is On Piano Playing by Gyorgy Sandor.

“Since we do not believe in mechanical practicing, we recommend eliminating most studies that feature technique and not music (Hanon, Pischna, Czerny). Exercises and technical studies that employ certain technical patterns repetitiously tend to lead us to mechanical practicing. It is much more productive to assimilate a technical formula in its purest form and, when it is learned correctly, to employ it at once in a musical composition by adapting it to the specific demands of the piece. The piano repertoire is so immense - there is so much to learn - that it is foolish to spend time with inferior music when the same technical development can be achieved with great music.”

Why play Hanon or Czerny when you can play Scarlatti?

Good question.

Because my single weakness was that my little fingers couldn't play anything. It turns out this wasn't only unique to me but all peoples little fingers are weak. I looked up how to train my fingers and after much reading decided that Hanon was what I needed.

After getting and learning the exercises, not only are my little fingers improving but it also undid and fixed the sprain that I had in my right wrist for over the last decade.

But I keep hearing that for some reason, these exercises are bad / not recommended / can cause damage, when they actually fixed my damage.

I wouldn't have minded trying other exercises and am now also improving random chord and arpeggio exercises after watching a tutorial on how to do so, however my initial decision was made based on my need to build finger independence, and Hanon is supposed be the book for building finger independence.

I don't understand why people do not believe in mechanical exercises because I couldn't play with my pinky fingers at all, and already damaged a wrist by trying to play without them. The reluctance and aversion to teaching mechanical exercises may have contributed to what school teachers I did have not knowing or wanting to teach me to use these to improve.


'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
JJHLH #2977862 05/11/20 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by JJHLH
One of my favorite piano books is On Piano Playing by Gyorgy Sandor.

“Exercises and technical studies that employ certain technical patterns repetitiously tend to lead us to mechanical practicing. It is much more productive to assimilate a technical formula in its purest form and, when it is learned correctly, to employ it at once in a musical composition by adapting it to the specific demands of the piece.”

Why play Hanon or Czerny when you can play Scarlatti?
Agreed! Analogous to choosing red bell peppers, kiwi or citrus fruit to get more vitamin C in your diet as opposed to taking a specific tablet supplement. Any specific technique in music is best learned in the context of the music piece in which it’s found IMO.

Then again, if one feels Hanon or Czerny is beneficial to them personally then they should feel free to use these exercises.


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Re: Getting through Burnout
Keselo #2977865 05/11/20 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Keselo
Originally Posted by Bhav
Originally Posted by dogperson
Bhav
Since you have never taken a lesson from a piano teacher, you do not have the experience or qualifications to discuss what most piano teachers do or don’t do nor evaluate the quality of teaching.

The person that came to my school to teach me was a piano teacher, and when I tried asked for help from what teachers I had at university none helped me, so stop trying to use your over privilege of having had access to any such teachers to dismiss my statements.

Also I do have the qualifications for this actually, and qualifications are still not at all mandatory for anything to do with teaching piano.

If as you say, music and piano teachers are two different things, gaining a music qualification does not qualify one to teach piano.

Also feel free to read this and maybe educate yourself https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/27/music-lessons-children-white-wealthy

'I know this because I struggled enormously to read notation as a child, meaning that my enthusiasm for music was not registered at primary level. At secondary school, I was fortunate enough to have a teacher who picked up on my passion. One day he pulled me aside, and said “you like music, don’t you?” before throwing me into two choirs, as well as singing and piano lessons. I learned Mozart, West Side Story and can now sing in Latin, German and Italian, eventually getting my grade 8.

Still, I cannot sight read. This is something that means I cannot join the many choirs around the UK that name this as a requirement. The patterns and figures of music don’t easily unravel in my mind. I suspect that’s the case for many other children and adults; some get notation, others don’t. Neither is indicative of talent, but while we do not find lateral, inclusive ways to engage people – as well as loosening our ideas of what constitutes musical ability – we are losing masses of would-be performers'

Now do quit trying to use the fact that I DIDN'T EVEN HAVE ACCESS TO the education that I would have required as a means to try and silence my statements.
I haven't been active on this forum for almost a year, so I've only encountered a few of your posts. That being said, you are by a country mile the most negative person I've seen on this forum in the 3 years I've attended this place. All you do is attack every method that isn't your own and extrapolate your own experiences to the extreme.

It makes me wonder why you've posted nearly 500 comments here. You clearly don't like it here, as all you do is pick fights with people and repeat the same angry words time after time. You truly remind me of the anti-abortion folks who'll do nothing but stand outside a clinic all day with the sole intention of being nasty and hurtful to others, jamming their opinion, quite vocally, down other people's throat. Perhaps you'll do good to remind yourself of the definition of a forum, which is a meeting or medium where ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged.. That suggests a two-way street!

I've only been back here for a couple of weeks, you call me negative but have you even read how much people not only here but all over dismiss Hanon?

http://www.leatham.com.au/teach/hanon-and-czerny.html

'The first 38 Hanon pieces are brain-numbing, time-wasting, arm-damaging, style-eroding, soul-destroying, joy-free, audience-hostile rubbish.'

I haven't even said anything just 1% as negative as such comments as these. I get shut down anytime I state that these exercises worked brilliantly for me and get accused of knowing nothing and giving bad advice, before I responded with any negativity of my own.

How exactly does every 'teacher' automatically know that these exercises aren't going to work for every student? I am far from the only person that has gained vastly from taking just a few months to learn them.

Personally the only reason I was held back physically and damaged a wrist is from a lack of doing mechanical exercises to build finger evenness. So I have every right to dismiss what to me is sheer unbelievable jargon of anyone claiming that these exercises do not work or are in anyway bad.

Mechanical exercises to me are the equivalent of exercising and stretching before doing any sports, running on a treadmill before attempting to win a marathon. I cannot see how it is possible to excel at playing the piano without ever using technical exercises and relying only on learning pieces.

Last edited by Bhav; 05/11/20 11:58 AM.

'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977874 05/11/20 12:07 PM
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I am not against Hanon, but it is terrible advice to say that one must follow the instructions 100%. They were playing on a very different instrument then. Modern pianos require arm weight and so "lifting the fingers high" is bad to do.

I use Hanon with some students to teach them technique so that they're not focusing on playing a piece of music but totally on the exercise which is easy enough to grasp. Not all students like Hanon, so I don't force it.

Personally, I benefitted immensely from Hanon after my car accident where I had to "unscramble" my brain. Forcing myself to focus while playing something very bring helped me a lot, and I also had carpal tunnel and nerve damage from the accident, so I had to focus on my technique to rebuild it. Of course, I was working on repertoire and scales at the time. So there is benefit to it, if one is careful.


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Re: Getting through Burnout
J.Kennedy #2977876 05/11/20 12:14 PM
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Is there any evidence that Hanon exercises were written for very different instruments, as playing them on a mere DGX 630 as written has literally turned my fingers into pure magic. There was nothing at all to difficult about this, just learning them slowly and cautiously. If you actually play anything with poor technique you can cause damage. From what I have learned they are very easy and become effortless to play as they are intended as long you don't play them with any tension. Holding the hands high actually means playing with out any tension, holding them low and placing the fingers above the wrists naturally contracts the forearms and locks the wrists. Holding your hands high and playing with your fingers pointing down from the wrist and fingertips on the keys fully relaxes the forearm and loosens the wrist, you can very easily do this yourself and see.


'Its too rare to break a hand from playing the piano ... But playing Hanon as written will break your hand'

- Self proclaimed 'piano teachers' on the internet.
Re: Getting through Burnout
Bhav #2977911 05/11/20 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Bhav
[quote=JJHLH][quote=Bhav]Good question.

Because my single weakness was that my little fingers couldn't play anything. It turns out this wasn't only unique to me but all peoples little fingers are weak. I looked up how to train my fingers and after much reading decided that Hanon was what I needed.

After getting and learning the exercises, not only are my little fingers improving but it also undid and fixed the sprain that I had in my right wrist for over the last decade.

But I keep hearing that for some reason, these exercises are bad / not recommended / can cause damage, when they actually fixed my damage.

I wouldn't have minded trying other exercises and am now also improving random chord and arpeggio exercises after watching a tutorial on how to do so, however my initial decision was made based on my need to build finger independence, and Hanon is supposed be the book for building finger independence.

I don't understand why people do not believe in mechanical exercises because I couldn't play with my pinky fingers at all, and already damaged a wrist by trying to play without them. The reluctance and aversion to teaching mechanical exercises may have contributed to what school teachers I did have not knowing or wanting to teach me to use these to improve.

That’s awesome! Results are what ultimately matter most, particularly if you are enjoying the process.


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Re: Getting through Burnout
Bhav #2977957 05/11/20 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Bhav
Is there any evidence that Hanon exercises were written for very different instruments, as playing them on a mere DGX 630 as written has literally turned my fingers into pure magic. There was nothing at all to difficult about this, just learning them slowly and cautiously. If you actually play anything with poor technique you can cause damage. From what I have learned they are very easy and become effortless to play as they are intended as long you don't play them with any tension. Holding the hands high actually means playing with out any tension, holding them low and placing the fingers above the wrists naturally contracts the forearms and locks the wrists. Holding your hands high and playing with your fingers pointing down from the wrist and fingertips on the keys fully relaxes the forearm and loosens the wrist, you can very easily do this yourself and see.
It says "lift the FINGERS high," which is not how you play a modern piano. This was written in 1873, and the pianos at that time were not the modern pianos. No teacher I know of adheres to these words when working with Hanon.

To be honest, I'm sure you are doing very fine with your playing, but the weight of a DGX is very little like an acoustic piano. It is Yamaha's GHS action and is extremely light. And to reiterate, I am not at all against Hanon - I just cross out that one little line and we're fine smile


private piano/voice teacher FT

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