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Originally Posted by DreamPiano80
For me, that is my current 60's Yamaha G7 smile

Please share your experience, it is fun smile
Yes, this should be a fun thread.

I once had an opportunity to play for a moment on a Bosendorfer at a dealer (don't recall for sure, but it may have been a 280). That was impressive - such a rich and unique tone. An absolute feast for the ears. But of course entirely out of my budget range!

Back in 1996 when I was shopping for my first grand piano, I played just about everything I could find. Other than some Steinways that I couldn't afford, the only piano which had "the sound" I had been searching for, was the Kawai RX line. It was literally a spiritual moment when I sat down at an RX-2 and the tone quality carried me off to another place; my search had ended.

I enjoyed the RX-2 for some 23 years. Eventually I began to yearn for an action with easier dynamic control, and a larger structure that could produce clearer bass. Quite by accident, I stumbled across a GX-6 for sale at a dealer, which was new other than having been in rental service for about a year. And it was priced attractively, within my means after allowing for trade-in.

So I visited the dealer to give it a try and instantly fell in love. Tone was not the same as the RX, being warmer and more lush, but it was still gorgeous and of course the bass was much fuller, clearer and more satisfying. Just as importantly, the action gave me all the control I could want: Finally, pp and ppp with ease.

A month later, and it was gracing my living room. Of course no instrument is perfect - in particular it does need some voicing to even out octaves 3 and 4, which I will have done in due course - but it's close enough that I expect it to completely satisfy my piano needs for the remainder of my stay on Earth. I feel blessed and quite fortunate to have found this instrument.

Example GX-6 high quality recording which matches my own piano very closely: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMrDmKdhQrQ

Last edited by MarianneØ; 04/18/20 06:38 PM.

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I'll be modest. Bösendorfer Model 225.

One day I hope to own one.


When you play, never mind who listens to you. R.Schumann.

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Originally Posted by MarianneØ
Originally Posted by DreamPiano80
For me, that is my current 60's Yamaha G7 smile

Please share your experience, it is fun smile
Yes, this should be a fun thread.

I once had an opportunity to play for a moment on a Bosendorfer at a dealer (don't recall for sure, but it may have been a 280). That was impressive - such a rich and unique tone. An absolute feast for the ears. But of course entirely out of my budget range!

Back in 1996 when I was shopping for my first grand piano, I played just about everything I could find. Other than some Steinways that I couldn't afford, the only piano which had "the sound" I had been searching for, was the Kawai RX line. It was literally a spiritual moment when I sat down at an RX-2 and the tone quality carried me off to another place; my search had ended.

I enjoyed the RX-2 for some 23 years. Eventually I began to yearn for an action with easier dynamic control, and a larger structure that could produce clearer bass. Quite by accident, I stumbled across a GX-6 for sale at a dealer, which was new other than having been in rental service for about a year. And it was priced attractively, within my means after allowing for trade-in.

So I visited the dealer to give it a try and instantly fell in love. Tone was not the same as the RX, being warmer and more lush, but it was still gorgeous and of course the bass was much fuller, clearer and more satisfying. Just as importantly, the action gave me all the control I could want: Finally, pp and ppp with ease.

A month later, and it was gracing my living room. Of course no instrument is perfect - in particular it does need some voicing to even out octaves 3 and 4, which I will have done in due course - but it's close enough that I expect it to completely satisfy my piano needs for the remainder of my stay on Earth. I feel blessed and quite fortunate to have found this instrument.

Example GX-6 high quality recording which matches my own piano very closely: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMrDmKdhQrQ

I agree with you... what a gorgeous sound!!!

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While trying to find my first acoustic piano, I tried many uprights & baby grands around 4’10” to 5’7” and couldn’t find one I liked.
I then tried 6’ and larger, various Bluthner’s & Bechstein’s.
An old Bechstein C, although obviously out of tune, was lovely to play.
It was very tempting, but I thought maybe a bit too big and a little over budget.
I settled for a Bechstein model B, which is just the right size for my room.

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It was in the 1970s when I played a Mason & Hamlin A at Cline Piano on Mission Street in San Francisco that I decided I wanted one. It was many years before I got one, which the original owner had bought from Cline Piano in 1923. Today it vies with my wife's 1920 Steinway O. I wish I played well enough to do them justice.


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Originally Posted by BDB
I wish I played well enough to do them justice.

I feel the same!

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Originally Posted by David-G
Originally Posted by BDB
I wish I played well enough to do them justice.

I feel the same!

I know that feeling, as I'm strictly amateur when it comes to Piano. However, there are plenty of pieces which are not difficult to play, and which still take great advantage of the piano's range and expressive capability. In fact, I look to pieces of more modest difficulty, rather than virtuoso works, if I want to hear a piano's tone sing out most clearly. Slower pieces can be so beautiful when played with a nice even touch and plenty of passion.


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Ah to dream... If money and space were no object, I would start by spending a good long time flying all over the place trying out all the fancy pianos that I've only ever read about.... Sigh.... smile

Last edited by ShiroKuro; 04/18/20 07:57 PM.

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Originally Posted by David-G
Originally Posted by BDB
I wish I played well enough to do them justice.

I feel the same!
Same here. My piano is always the heavyweight in this partnership.


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For the last 5 years my fav have been always the Bösendorfer, they all have this power and this resonance that goes on and on for ever, each note keeps staying in the room like a ghost, playing them is like a spiritual experience. I actually wish every piano brand could deliver the same result.

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Originally Posted by pold
For the last 5 years my fav have been always the Bösendorfer, they all have this power and this resonance that goes on and on for ever, each note keeps staying in the room like a ghost, playing them is like a spiritual experience. I actually wish every piano brand could deliver the same result.

Great description. Yes, that’s a Bösendorfer.


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We're very fortunate to have a Boesendorfer 225, purchased new in 1985, on our first trip to Europe after our marriage in 1970. My wife's piano teacher in the late '60's had a Boesendorfer that she never forgot playing. We saw them from time to time where we live in the San Francisco area, but they were way over our budget. When we were in Europe the dollar was historically strong, so the 225 suddenly was possible to buy. She chose one out of four that were available at the factory and our Paris dealer had it flown to California to our home where it has remained, not quite 35 years.


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Quote
each note keeps staying in the room like a ghost

3hearts I love that description!


Started piano June 1999.
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I've been fortunate enough to play lots of fantastic pianos over the years but the most recent that sticks out to me as the most favourite piano I've played was probably about two years ago. Although I must confess that much like Rich, I find that my opinion can change depending on what I play and when.

I remember the day very well as I had been in London for something and dedicated time to visiting Steinway Hall (where I hadn't been for quite some years) and also Yamaha Music London. I had phoned both prior to visiting to check that it was ok to pop in and try the pianos for a bit as I had no intention of buying - both confirmed this was fine. Quite eagerly, I headed to Steinways first with various thoughts in my mind as to what models I would play with which repertoire and conjured up how these would sound with their bell-like trebles and rounded basses.

I tried three models at Steinway Hall, I believe they were a Model D (of which I played two), Model B and Model A. I sat down at the D first and to be honest, I was quite disappointed. I had played Model Ds regularly at university and was expecting the Ds in the showroom to be so much finer. The actions were smooth, well regulated and the tone pretty even but there was a certain je ne sais quois that was missing. The other D I played was equally as uninspiring. I then moved to the Model B and this didn't do it for me. I seem to recall the tone being incredibly uneven across the registers which really surprised me. Lastly I sat down at the Model A and at long last, I found a Steinway in the showroom that I enjoyed playing! The A was good and I certainly connected it with it far more than either the B or D but it was still lacking something. I had just got up to leave when coincidentally the salesman came in and asked me, quite bluntly, to leave... I get that it was Steinways I was in and they're a prestigious brand (and also I wasn't buying) but I'm a classically trained pianist so it wasn't like I was playing Twinkle Twinkle Little Start on a £140,000 concert grand. I think the abruptness from the salesman coupled with such unexpected disappointment from the pianos left a sour taste in my mouth...

Anyway, onto Yamahas! I distinctly remember thinking to myself 'well, if the world's supposed finest pianos don't live up to my expectations then whatever will the Yamahas be like?'. That sentiment very quickly went out of my mind when I sat down at the Yamaha CF6. Oh my god. Incredible. It completely blew all the Steinways out of the water, even the 9' Model D. I distinctly remember the CF6 sounding like and having the presence of a concert grand. The tone was gorgeous: romantic, dark and moody but with a bite that gave an edge when you needed it. The crescendo octave passages leading up to the climax in Chopin's Nocturne Op. 48 No. 1 (C minor) came out just as intended.

Equally so, the second movement of Mozart's Sonata in F Major (K.280) was delicately sublime and I could achieve soft pianissimos with accuracy. Boy, I loved absolutely everything about the CF6. The action, the tone, the control I could achieve - all of these things and more made my playing sound incredible! My understanding of that particular piano at the time was that it had become a bit of a 'Floor Queen' (think I have the right terminology there?) and I even visited Yamaha a few months later and it had not sold. Finally about a year later when I was looking to purchase my NU1X, the CF6 had gone.

I appreciate that this has been a long post so thanks to those of you who have stuck with me reading it! I think there can quite often be a story behind the most favourite pianos we have played. When the time comes for me to purchase a grand again, I will certainly try the CF6s and can only hope that they live up to my experience of playing them previously. That said, I almost don't want to try one again for fear of it tainting the incredible memory of I have of them...

So in brief (and for those of you who don't want to read all of the above), the Yamaha CF6 has (most recently) been my most favourite piano that I have played.

All the best,

Will


Current: Yamaha AvantGrand NU1X
Previous: Venables & Son Academy-168, Kawai K-15 E and Yamaha Clavinova CVP-208

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While I've played basically every concert grand of the renowned brands, I have recently discovered a real ear opener: An 1879 Erard. It's not the "Grand de Concert", but one size smaller, i.e. 245cm. That was my first experience with a piano of that age that actually opened my heart, even with music composed long after it was built. I've played 'Le Gibet' on it a couple of times and while it's a little difficult to get used to the Erard action, it's really rewarding in terms of clarity in sound and dynamic range. Even though my Steinway B is only 7 years younger, it feels like this Erard is from a different era with its straight strung bass.

Together with an 1851 Streicher, this piano really gave me a whole new understanding of 19th century piano literature.

Here is the Erard: http://www.hecherpiano.com/sammlung/erard_1879.html

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A Steingräber A190, just slightly ahead of a Shigeru Kawai SK2 and an older Bösendorfer. I played a Fazioli for only a couple of minutes and that was also nice. But for grand pianos, I'd probably choose a Steingräber. For uprights it would have to be a Bösendorfer 130, I haven't played anything that comes close. Maybe Steinway.
But the variations between instruments seem to be sometimes greater than the variations between manufacturers with a similar style.

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The best piano I've ever played was a yamaha concert grand, cf something i guess. It was voiced for a recital on a concert hall and the manager being friend from college days invited me to play it. It was glorious. That day and forever the idea of yamahas being too brights was erased from my mind

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Originally Posted by williambonard
I've been fortunate enough to play lots of fantastic pianos over the years but the most recent that sticks out to me as the most favourite piano I've played was probably about two years ago. Although I must confess that much like Rich, I find that my opinion can change depending on what I play and when.

I remember the day very well as I had been in London for something and dedicated time to visiting Steinway Hall (where I hadn't been for quite some years) and also Yamaha Music London. I had phoned both prior to visiting to check that it was ok to pop in and try the pianos for a bit as I had no intention of buying - both confirmed this was fine. Quite eagerly, I headed to Steinways first with various thoughts in my mind as to what models I would play with which repertoire and conjured up how these would sound with their bell-like trebles and rounded basses.

I tried three models at Steinway Hall, I believe they were a Model D (of which I played two), Model B and Model A. I sat down at the D first and to be honest, I was quite disappointed. I had played Model Ds regularly at university and was expecting the Ds in the showroom to be so much finer. The actions were smooth, well regulated and the tone pretty even but there was a certain je ne sais quois that was missing. The other D I played was equally as uninspiring. I then moved to the Model B and this didn't do it for me. I seem to recall the tone being incredibly uneven across the registers which really surprised me. Lastly I sat down at the Model A and at long last, I found a Steinway in the showroom that I enjoyed playing! The A was good and I certainly connected it with it far more than either the B or D but it was still lacking something. I had just got up to leave when coincidentally the salesman came in and asked me, quite bluntly, to leave... I get that it was Steinways I was in and they're a prestigious brand (and also I wasn't buying) but I'm a classically trained pianist so it wasn't like I was playing Twinkle Twinkle Little Start on a £140,000 concert grand. I think the abruptness from the salesman coupled with such unexpected disappointment from the pianos left a sour taste in my mouth...

Anyway, onto Yamahas! I distinctly remember thinking to myself 'well, if the world's supposed finest pianos don't live up to my expectations then whatever will the Yamahas be like?'. That sentiment very quickly went out of my mind when I sat down at the Yamaha CF6. Oh my god. Incredible. It completely blew all the Steinways out of the water, even the 9' Model D. I distinctly remember the CF6 sounding like and having the presence of a concert grand. The tone was gorgeous: romantic, dark and moody but with a bite that gave an edge when you needed it. The crescendo octave passages leading up to the climax in Chopin's Nocturne Op. 48 No. 1 (C minor) came out just as intended.

Equally so, the second movement of Mozart's Sonata in F Major (K.280) was delicately sublime and I could achieve soft pianissimos with accuracy. Boy, I loved absolutely everything about the CF6. The action, the tone, the control I could achieve - all of these things and more made my playing sound incredible! My understanding of that particular piano at the time was that it had become a bit of a 'Floor Queen' (think I have the right terminology there?) and I even visited Yamaha a few months later and it had not sold. Finally about a year later when I was looking to purchase my NU1X, the CF6 had gone.

I appreciate that this has been a long post so thanks to those of you who have stuck with me reading it! I think there can quite often be a story behind the most favourite pianos we have played. When the time comes for me to purchase a grand again, I will certainly try the CF6s and can only hope that they live up to my experience of playing them previously. That said, I almost don't want to try one again for fear of it tainting the incredible memory of I have of them...

So in brief (and for those of you who don't want to read all of the above), the Yamaha CF6 has (most recently) been my most favourite piano that I have played.

All the best,

Will

Oh no, please never ask dealers for being ok to pop in and try the pianos for a bit as you have no intention of buying. They won't be happy.


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Originally Posted by Keybender
But the variations between instruments seem to be sometimes greater than the variations between manufacturers with a similar style.

Yes, definitely. And to this I would add, the importance of a really good piano tech to prep the piano and maintain it is another detail. I really felt (and heard) this clearly when I was piano shopping. After playing the one Steinway that was just a dream, whenever I played a new instrument, I got into the habit of asking who prepped the piano.

Another thing that's interesting (though perhaps a bit of thread drift from the main topic here) is to ask a dealer "why do I like this piano so much better than that one" (esp. when trying two pianos that are the same/similar brand, same/similar model etc.) It really informative to hear how different dealers answer that question.


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1.) a classic Bösendorfer Concert Grand
2.) a new Bösendorfer 200CS
3.) a really old August Förster 170
4.) an older Bösendorfer Upright

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