2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments. Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
92 members (Baltguy, ambrozy, Abdol, Beansparrow, BachToTheFuture, Bentsch, BrokenSymmetry, Animisha, 25 invisible), 907 guests, and 601 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 3 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
Amykpiano #2953127 02/29/20 10:44 PM
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 262
S
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
S
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 262
Originally Posted by Amykpiano
I don't understand how she learns those pieces if she can't read? It seems like the repertoire must take her months to learn each piece, because it must take a very long time just to learn the notes at that rate? I find it kind of hard to believe. Was she never taught intervals?


Why would it take her a long time? Her problem is with prima vista sight-reading "in the moment, in real time" and at tempo, not with reading itself. If you are learning a piece that is challenging for your level of playing ability (as opposed to your sight-reading level), you are spending many hours and repetitions getting on top of the fingering, tied and held notes, rythym, dynamics, articulation etc. After 50 or 100 playthroughs getting all that mastered, you know the piece by heart, without even actively trying to memorise it. How could you not? It would be harder to not know it than to know it.


Yamaha U1. Yamaha P-45. Yamaha RD-250 (a long time ago). smile
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953468 03/02/20 04:29 AM
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 161
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 161
I'm the same, but I'm working on changing that. I'm not interested in sight reading per se, but I want to have good plain reading skills just to learn pieces faster / play them with the sheet music as a reference.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
bennevis #2953469 03/02/20 04:34 AM
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 161
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 161
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Amykpiano
So they got a music degree without ever learning to read music? That seems kind of amazing that it's possible. They must have incredible memory ability.

Nobody ever gets a music degree without being able to read music.

ABRSM is not a music degree. As I know they have like 4 sections, if you suck at sight reading and do well in the other 3 you're good to go.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953496 03/02/20 06:20 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
I'm late in the game. I went to her site and think I have a picture of what happened. One reason at least for one of the early videos, was to signal to teachers the importance of ensuring their students get underlying skills such as sight reading. She's still in the middle of clearing up the whole mess and so doesn't have the whole picture, but has a great deal of it. Sort of deja vu for me. wink

She had 5 years of piano lessons, as an adult. Was diligent about practising, preparing her pieces, and to the best of her knowledge, was getting all the skills including reading. As she went up the grades, it took longer to prepare a piece - but one would think "harder pieces, take longer, logically" and not wrry about it. The crisis crept up on her. At the moment that she dropped out, she was supposedly at the zenith - ready to do exams, acing everything in the program, teacher pleased and so on. But when she was to play starting at a random measure she was lost. I assume that her teacher was "nice" and "sweet" and "patient" about it ...which is not the same thing as recognizing a problem, its source, and helping with it. Or preventing it in the first place.

I've been a similar route. Teacher Marbeth's terms "product vs. process orientation" gave me the vocab for it. "Product" is a piece, an exam, a performance, the end deal --- "process" is the skills and the growth. They are intertwined. Ideally if a student is working through their grade 1, 2, 3, 4 ... pieces, etudes, and scales .... they are also developing underlying skills. It's the skills which matter much more. BUT it is easy to manage to produce the "product" and not get the skills. You can do the whole set of stuff for ABRSM, RCM etc. and miss out on skills. For me it was RCM. My last etude was gr. 7 (violin). This is especially so for adult students. Because we can conceptualize: know what it should sound like; be very diligent - we can end up producing the product, miss the underlying skills, and never realize.

If you have built on shaky ground, and not know it, then at some advanced grade the whole thing can blow up on you. First there are rumblings, but you don't know what that's about. And you will think "This must be what advanced feels like." The cause (and solution) in my case is to get at what it is that you've been missing since day 1. Scrap the entire "program" - forget about preparing for gr. 6 exams, repertoire, whatever.

If a student like this went to another - astute - teacher - that teacher would say "Look, you have some serious reading problems here. Let's work on building this first, and get your skills in order. We'll put the other things you've been doing on the back burner." Is she stayed with her original teacher .... that teacher did not stress the skill in the first place; did not address the problem once signs started to show up - what are the chances that the teacher would suddenly start solving this problem?

She seems to have quit out of embarrassment of how badly she did when she floundered through the "at random" sections of music. That's a stupid reason to quit. But perhaps at a gut level she also felt that this teacher could not help her with the reading skills issue. After all, she hadn't. If in the lessons where she was bombing on those occasions, her teacher had said, "Look, we seem to have reading problem here. How about we go after this first." she probably would not have quit. Otoh, the teacher may have been afraid to "discourage" her by stressing weaknesses or skills .... which is another common thing that happens.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953500 03/02/20 06:28 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
The video itself is clear as a bell to me. Her repertoire is material she practised, and so she knows it well. The score that is up is a reminder of things that she has practised, and it's in memory. She probably never really learned to read. In fact, she talks somewhere of something like, not recognizing G. It makes absolute sense that she is struggling with even the simplest music, if "G" isn't anything or anywhere. And I have been there.

The hesitancy is not the "cause", and "letting loose", "letting go of perfection" is not the solution. Supposing we both want to go to Rome. I'm east of Rome, so to get there I have to go west. If I want to tell you how to go to Rome, I better find out that you are west of Rome, before I tell you to travel west .... because that advice will get you further and further away. You cannot advise someone based on how you learned, because you have to find out how they learned and what their situation is.

She's doing the right thing. The only thing with that video is that if it's addressed to teachers, only some teachers will "get it". And those teachers are the ones who won't create that problem in their students in the first place.

I've got a t-shirt to give away, except nobody should want it. wink

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
MichaelJK #2953565 03/02/20 10:37 AM
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 265
J
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
J
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 265
Originally Posted by MichaelJK
Originally Posted by Jack Moody
Originally Posted by MichaelJK
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Still sounds illogical to me. You begin with less hesitation which is what the person cannot do without playing wrong notes. Kind of like saying a person overeats and is overweight. Solution:don't be overweight,


You can easily sidestep this problem if you just let yourself play wrong notes.


This reminds me of other anecdotes.
Cars- Fast, reliable and cheap, you can have 2 of the 3.
Bodybuilding- Big, cut, and natural (no peds). You can't have all 3.

Here's a new one. Sight reading - Fast, accurate, and inexperienced. You can only be 2 of the 3.


Yes, I'd say that's about right. You could also say Speed, Accuracy, and Complexity. If you want to play faster and more accurately, you have to play simpler music.

This is simple but genius.

Speed, accuracy and complexity. You want all 3, but how do you get them?

2 of the 3 are always possible! Think about that!

Most think that accuracy should NEVER be compromised though.

1. Tell someone to practice simpler songs so they can play faster and they say ok.
2. Tell someone to practice slower so they can accurately play more complex songs and they say ok.
3. Tell someone to practice less accurately so they can play more complex songs faster and they will think you are crazy.

Are we failing to push for speed and complexity combined?

Should you spend at least a little time on all 3 methods? If not, why?

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953622 03/02/20 02:56 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,521
D
dmd Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,521
Here is what I get from that video ….

She is experiencing the same thing that all those who memorize pieces and look exclusively at their hands as they play.

She runs out of memory eventually and begins to forget pieces that they had learned previously.

Then, they have to "re-learn" the piece later on if they desire to play it again.

It gets easier to learn but that process get frustrating over time.

So ….

They decide they have to learn to play while following alone in the notation.

That is DIFFICULT.

So …. some forge ahead and get better at it.

Those players find a while new world opens up as they can now pick up a sheet of music (at their level) and just play through it immediately.

Maybe not perfect …. but enough so they can recognize the tune.

Then they practice it to their standard.

Later on ….they can just pick it up and play it and the notation will be there to remind them of parts they might have forgotten as they play.

Much easier.

It took some work but the rewards were well worth it.


Don

Casio PX-S1000, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones, Pianoteq, Focus Rite Scarlett 2i2 Audio Interface
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
keystring #2953703 03/02/20 06:53 PM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,955
E
3000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
3000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,955
Originally Posted by keystring
I'm late in the game...... She seems to have quit out of embarrassment of how badly she did when she floundered through the "at random" sections of music. That's a stupid reason to quit. But perhaps at a gut level she also felt that this teacher could not help her with the reading skills issue.


better late than never smile

In any case you summarised her situation quite well having some empathy for the subject.

Originally Posted by keystring
If a student like this went to another - astute - teacher - that teacher would say "Look, you have some serious reading problems here. Let's work on building this first, and get your skills in order. We'll put the other things you've been doing on the back burner." Is she stayed with her original teacher .... that teacher did not stress the skill in the first place; did not address the problem once signs started to show up - what are the chances that the teacher would suddenly start solving this problem?


Perhaps, but this was not my experience when I changed to what I consider to be a fantastic and astute teacher. One problem seems to be the exam system itself. Although there are some good reasons for doing exams one of the detriments is the lack of focus on sight reading ability. Understandably not everyone is going to make a great sight reader, but the exam component and marking for sight reading is tiny compared to playing the main pieces. This becomes a problem of balance for the teacher, students/parents want exam results to show they are progressing. So ear training and sight reading become lower priorities and often neglected until close to exam time.


Following Trying to follow the Ling Ling 40 hour method

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953717 03/02/20 07:52 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,077
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,077
Originally Posted by earlofmar
One problem seems to be the exam system itself. Although there are some good reasons for doing exams one of the detriments is the lack of focus on sight reading ability. Understandably not everyone is going to make a great sight reader, but the exam component and marking for sight reading is tiny compared to playing the main pieces. This becomes a problem of balance for the teacher, students/parents want exam results to show they are progressing. So ear training and sight reading become lower priorities and often neglected until close to exam time.

If you look at the Piano Teachers Forum, you'll find that ear training is hardly on the radar, and sight-reading is rarely important for teachers whose students don't do exams. In other words, without exams, there is no reason to 'waste time' on teaching aural skills and sight-reading. (And aural skills is the one section where you can easily score maximum marks, thus getting 12% of the total marks in ABRSM, so why wouldn't a teacher teach it? Sight-reading makes up 14%. If you're bad at both, it's very unlikely you'll scrape a pass).

When I was a student, as I've mentioned many times before, I was tested on sight-reading at every lesson (my teacher got me to sight-read every piece that I was going to learn, in front of her), and aural training started from the first lesson, with counting beats aloud in pitch with the notes. None of my peers had any problem with sight-reading and aural skills either, though all had different teachers and all did ABRSM exams. Almost everyone in my high school who were having instrumental lessons also sang in the school choir (where sight-singing skills were required, because of the rep that we learnt and performed), which was how I found friends to play duets with (violin & piano, as well as piano duets: we basically sight-read through lots of stuff for fun).

I think the problem is mainly with adult students who want to 'push through' the grades quickly (or whose teachers believe - rightly or wrongly - that adults don't want to waste time with spending a lot of time on properly mastering basic skills), and therefore set the agenda for their teachers, like the adult student whose YT you posted.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953734 03/02/20 09:07 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Originally Posted by earlofmar

better late than never smile

In any case you summarised her situation quite well having some empathy for the subject.
[/quote ]
Thank you, earlofmarch. smile I guess one reason for the empathy is that I lived a situation that was very close. You diligently follow instructions, trusting them, and then discover you've been led down the garden path. It is not necessarily done with malice.
[quote]....This becomes a problem of balance for the teacher, students/parents want exam results to show they are progressing. So ear training and sight reading become lower priorities and often neglected until close to exam time.


There is often a fundamental misunderstanding about exams, and this does a lot of mischief. In my own teacher training and subsequent practice, exams and tests were seen as one way of keeping track of student progress and the direction to give your lessons. They were also seen as the weakest and least reliable method of assessment. When teaching large numbers of students such as in a classroom of 30, or when institutions such as schools and school systems need to process and categorize students, exams are used. They can be a "processing tool". Exams are only as good as their design and appropriateness for a particular student (body) and the assessor interpreting them. Ideally that is the teacher doing the teaching - but often it is done by outside bodies.

Exams often become a thing unto themselves. Instead of studying in order to learn, people study in order to pass exams, and in some cases actually bypass learning altogether. Our societies have been so inculcated by these mechanisms, which we are used to through school systems, work, etc., that we can take them for granted, and even expect and demand them.

In regard to music, a few years ago I was talking to a piano teacher who was throwing his hands up in frustration, because he had a student who insisted on doing the exams. Because he had to teach toward the exams, he could not give her the skills she needed, because he could not teach toward them. Preparing for the exams, prevented him from teaching her. Btw, this was not hard for me to understand because I was once in a similar situation with a student myself, in my field. We were locked in a situation due to the school system, and I was absolutely prevented from teaching this student.

You may also want to look up Elissa Milne's blog. Her material is used as exam material and she had a few things to say here a few years ago about exams. She straightened out some misperceptions I had about how things were set up.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
bennevis #2953735 03/02/20 09:12 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Originally Posted by bennevis
I think the problem is mainly with adult students who want to 'push through' the grades quickly (or whose teachers believe - rightly or wrongly - that adults don't want to waste time with spending a lot of time on properly mastering basic skills), and therefore set the agenda for their teachers, like the adult student whose YT you posted.

The adult student did 6 grades in 5 years which is not terribly fast. She did everything she was told, how she was told, and that's how she got in trouble. Her reason for quitting and studying on her own was for the purpose of slowing down the process. It is also not always as simple as "speed". Teachers may not grasp that an adult needs to be taught basic fundamental things. The teacher will skip these things because the student is progressing so well, so they must have it. The student, meanwhile, has no idea that anything is missing. These fundamental skills are silent killers, because in simpler more basic music, you don't need the tools, but later in higher grades it bites you - and you don't know what has bitten you. It is insiduous. The solution is what that student is doing: go after the skills you were never given.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953737 03/02/20 09:19 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,893
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,893
it is no mystery people, she goes through a detailed video on her blog where she goes through why she thinks she is a bad sight reader.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNp2pmBXBEk

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
scirocco #2953740 03/02/20 10:09 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 33
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 33
The video she posted seems much more than just not reading in the moment, she wasn't able to read even very simple music slowly. She says in the subsequent video that Moo posted that she could only learn 4 pieces all year because each piece took so long. That seems logical if a person is not able to sight read well, it would take so long just to recognize the notes to play the piece, then you'd have to spend a few weeks relearning the notes each time you played until you committed it to memory. That's what I mean that it must have taken such a long time. It seems like she has been able to make up for lost time very quickly though, she is certainly a very committed student!


Amy
Early Beginner
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953743 03/02/20 10:26 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,893
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,893
i had a watch of the videos. i am not a teacher but to me this experiment of buying huge amount of books and just focusing on solidly on 90 mins sight reading. i am not sure why the focus is on sight reading. there appears a more fundamental reading and learning problem from the score. i actually do not think it is so important the first (or second or every third) playing of a piece. however bad these attempt unless in an exam setting it really does not matter. what matters is that you are able to successfully correct or not. if we make an error it is basic stuff but we would practice to solve it. we can then learn. piano reading score is a lot of trial and error and learning. many strategies can be used. play it very slowly. hands separately. count it. clap it. play it hands separately. then when we have it play it together again with strategies. what she however does is just go from the beginning and in all the attempts i saw it is just give it a go and if it doesnt work then there is not even basic strategies used. it cant seem to be focused or fixed. we instead just have someone practice the first attempts over and over with no music. i dont thinik it works. i actually think bennevis is correct that 'sight reading' may be something more for an exam. i am sure a bad sight reader is not a problem. i think it the inability of someone to go from a bad sight reading passage to correcting errors and then learning the score is essential. having no idea how to correct this however a huge issue. it really is a beginner problem where people just go back to the beginning and play the same hands together and hope for the best. unless this is worked on then i dont think there is much hope of solving these problems. i think it sad this is discussed on a public forum without this individual's permission but i do not myself think this is a successful way to solve a primary reading problem. i think this again shows me why teaching is so important. i would suggest you contact this person to ensure that she does not mind this debate as i do not want to be unfairly criticising someone if it is not wanted.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
Amykpiano #2953745 03/02/20 10:51 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,893
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 1,893
Originally Posted by Amykpiano
The video she posted seems much more than just not reading in the moment, she wasn't able to read even very simple music slowly. She says in the subsequent video that Moo posted that she could only learn 4 pieces all year because each piece took so long. That seems logical if a person is not able to sight read well, it would take so long just to recognize the notes to play the piece, then you'd have to spend a few weeks relearning the notes each time you played until you committed it to memory. That's what I mean that it must have taken such a long time. It seems like she has been able to make up for lost time very quickly though, she is certainly a very committed student!


I see. Maybe then sight reading is needed at a basic level to be able to read notes and play to a reasonable attempt. So perhaps yes I think that sight reading needs some work. I do however think that 'sight reading' ability is only really a test that matters for an exam. I do think more important that sight reading a passage and failing what is important is successfully using strategies then you can be going places. I really think it is more important to be able to know how to solve problems to be able to learn and reading scores. If you know how to practice effectively to solve problems then you can progress. I saw none of this in the examples. I am not a teacher so not really too sure on this but i dont think sight reading loads of scores if you cant problem solve will work. i think a teacher would be better to be honest. I would be interested to hear what a piano teacher thinks.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
Amykpiano #2953746 03/02/20 10:53 PM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,955
E
3000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
3000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,955
Originally Posted by Amykpiano
She says in the subsequent video that Moo posted that she could only learn 4 pieces all year because each piece took so long. That seems logical if a person is not able to sight read well, it would take so long just to recognize the notes to play the piece, then you'd have to spend a few weeks relearning the notes each time you played until you committed it to memory.


this low quantity of pieces is not because she is a bad prima vista sight reader, this is just very common for people taking exams, myself included. No, the principle reasons why pieces take longer to learn as they get harder is the technical requirements that have to be learned and honed until they become ingrained. Every new piano grade requires learning some new technique(s) which can be a very slow process. Additionally, each piece must be brought to a performance level, where every dynamic has been scrutinized, ingrained, and the piece is secure enough to withstand the rigor and problems that come with taking an exam. This all takes time, a lot of it. But also it is rather simplistic to talk about four pieces, as practice time/concentration levels is limited for most people and of course there is the learning and preparation of a huge amount of technical exercises, sight reading and ear tests. A typical year will also include work on learning the technical analysis of your works, misc theory as a minimum, but might also include a full theory exam in order to progress.

I am not a great prima vista sight reader, but I have no problem learning advanced pieces. Except for my very first run through of a piece I am not reading every note, no one does, But general sight reading is so very different to prima vista reading, although there is a relationship.



Last edited by earlofmar; 03/02/20 10:56 PM.

Following Trying to follow the Ling Ling 40 hour method

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953750 03/02/20 11:30 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 33
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 33
I'm fairly new to playing piano so maybe I'm just not understanding her in her videos as I am no where near grade 6 level. She says it was difficult for her to even start at different places in the piece when her teacher would ask her to start somewhere other than the beginning because she only memorized the pieces from the beginning. That seems like it's not just slow sight reading, but as I said, I'm pretty new to all this, so maybe there is way more to it that I just haven't experienced yet.


Amy
Early Beginner
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
Moo :) #2953751 03/02/20 11:38 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 33
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 33
I agree, that reading with accuracy and up to tempo with dynamics, I'm sure is only necessary for an exam. But if sight reading gets so far behind a person's playing level, I imagine it would reduce the number of pieces that can be learned because the process of learning would be slowed down quite a bit, even if the person can still learn less pieces to a very high level. I watched a few of her videos from last year and then some from now and it seems like she has made huge strides in a relatively short time, so her ability to play and probably her knowledge of theory, etc, probably made her learn to read more quickly than someone starting from square one. She has certainly progressed much more quickly than me! lol


Amy
Early Beginner
Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953759 03/03/20 01:13 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,195
The important thing is that she caught on that there was a problem, got off the conveyor belt, and started to work on the problem. She should never have been in that situation in the first place, and one of her videos is also a plea to teachers.

Re: It's time to talk about sight reading.........again
earlofmar #2953826 03/03/20 07:58 AM
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 161
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 161
Well I think there are different problems for her. The reason she was lost when she was asked to start from a random measure is not only because she is a bad sight reader, it's because of they way she memorized the piece. This must be the case when you rely mostly on muscle memory, I must be doing it different because I don't seem to have this problem even though my sight reading is bad. There's a difference between sight reading and just reading on a piece you worked for a week or a month or more. If I work on a piece for a month, even though I can't sight read it, I can play it from any measure and I can surely say where in the score I'm at and what note is there, because that is no sight reading. So I don't really understand how her piece learning really works. I think I heard about this kind of thing from some of Josh Wright's videos, he was telling about some students that can only play a piece from the beginning, I find it kind of amazing how that is even possible. Aren't they breaking the piece when learning in parts, like A, B, C, then phrases, then maybe work on some measure multiple times, then join together with the rest?

Also, I don't think doing 90 minutes of sight reading is really the way to go. The brain needs time to process that information, I found that after 30 minutes of sight reading practice my brain just tells me to gtfo.

Page 3 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
100,000!
---------------------
NEW! Sell Your Piano on our world famous Piano Forums!
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
New - Hammond SK-Pro organ & synth (SK1 upgrade)
by Doug M. - 01/15/21 01:09 PM
New Korg announcements in a few days...
by clothearednincompo - 01/15/21 12:17 PM
Estonia 190
by Walkman - 01/15/21 12:02 PM
My 'Gentle' and 'quieter' tuning technique
by Beemer - 01/15/21 10:46 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics204,265
Posts3,046,950
Members100,063
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4