2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.9 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Free Trial
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

Who's Online Now
32 registered members (CyberGene, Chouca, ChrisGoesPiano, Charades, AlphaBravoCharlie, Beowulf, Alex C, cmb13, Brometeo, dobro, 8 invisible), 377 guests, and 469 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Learux] #2947088 02/15/20 06:46 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,545
dogperson Offline
Silver Subscriber
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,545
Originally Posted by Learux
I will answer the question for all of you.

Can a pianists be self-taught? Yes, to a very rudimentary level.

Can a (classical) pianists be self-taught? No.

Easy as pie.


No, it is not ‘as easy as pie’ as there are classical pianists here who are self taught.
The question, however, is not about amateurs but professionals.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
" I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It’s ok to be a Work In Progress
Piano & Music Gifts & Accessories (570)
Piano accessories and music gift items, digital piano dolly, music theme party goods
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: dogperson] #2947100 02/15/20 06:51 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,386
L
LarryK Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,386
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by Learux
I will answer the question for all of you.

Can a pianists be self-taught? Yes, to a very rudimentary level.

Can a (classical) pianists be self-taught? No.

Easy as pie.


No, it is not ‘as easy as pie’ as there are classical pianists here who are self taught.
The question, however, is not about amateurs but professionals.




Yes, that is the question. I believe that it is rare for a professional pianist to be self-taught. Humans watch each other and learn from each other, we’re an imitative species. This tendency applies to many aspects of our lives, not just piano playing.

Watching videos of players is a form of taking lessons. No musician exists in a vacuum. Musicians learn from other musicians.


Yamaha U1 Silent Piano
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: LarryK] #2947114 02/15/20 06:58 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,545
dogperson Offline
Silver Subscriber
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,545
Originally Posted by LarryK
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by Learux
I will answer the question for all of you.

Can a pianists be self-taught? Yes, to a very rudimentary level.

Can a (classical) pianists be self-taught? No.

Easy as pie.


No, it is not ‘as easy as pie’ as there are classical pianists here who are self taught.
The question, however, is not about amateurs but professionals.




Yes, that is the question. I believe that it is rare for a professional pianist to be self-taught. Humans watch each other and learn from each other, we’re an imitative species. This tendency applies to many aspects of our lives, not just piano playing.

Watching videos of players is a form of taking lessons. No musician exists in a vacuum. Musicians learn from other musicians.


of course, all pianists learn from each other. The question is: are there any concert classical pianists who have not studied with a teacher?


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
" I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It’s ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: dogperson] #2947121 02/15/20 07:03 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,386
L
LarryK Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,386
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by LarryK
Originally Posted by dogperson
Originally Posted by Learux
I will answer the question for all of you.

Can a pianists be self-taught? Yes, to a very rudimentary level.

Can a (classical) pianists be self-taught? No.

Easy as pie.


No, it is not ‘as easy as pie’ as there are classical pianists here who are self taught.
The question, however, is not about amateurs but professionals.




Yes, that is the question. I believe that it is rare for a professional pianist to be self-taught. Humans watch each other and learn from each other, we’re an imitative species. This tendency applies to many aspects of our lives, not just piano playing.

Watching videos of players is a form of taking lessons. No musician exists in a vacuum. Musicians learn from other musicians.


of course, all pianists learn from each other. The question is: are there any concert classical pianists who have not studied with a teacher?


I guess we’ll have to conduct a survey to find out, but people lie, so we will never know!

I think Richter claimed to have been self taught but he also claimed to only practice a few hours a day but his wife said he never stopped, haha. His apartment building in Moscow was notorious because people were kept awake all the time by his incessant practicing.

So, the real question is, do any pianists not lie? I think the answer is no, all pianists lie, lol.

Anyway, everyone studies with a teacher, whether they know it or not, and whether they acknowledge it or not.

Last edited by LarryK; 02/15/20 07:07 AM.

Yamaha U1 Silent Piano
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: LarryK] #2947130 02/15/20 08:13 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,741
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,741
Originally Posted by LarryK
I think Richter claimed to have been self taught...
He had some lessons from his father who was a professional pianist. Later in life he studies with Neuhaus. So he was semi self taught up to a certain age but definitely not self taught.

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Juan Rezzuto] #2947139 02/15/20 08:54 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,907
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,907
There was a time, as I alluded to earlier, when (classical) concert pianists would happily name names when asked who they studied with.......to the extent if being economical with the truth. For instance, one masterclass with the great Arturo Wladimir Rezhevwinaskii would be trotted out as having "studied" with the great A.W.R.

These days, it's all reversed. If you played 'Twinkle, twinkle' by ear as a three-year-old before having proper lessons at four (with the great A.W.R.), you can claim "self-taught" status because - after all, you taught yourself for one whole year. That's far more important (and much more worth mentioning) than the ten years studying with A.W.R. followed by ten years at the Pachmann Conservatory for Very Gifted Youngsters with Perfect Pitch...........


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Juan Rezzuto] #2947288 02/15/20 03:20 PM
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 17
I
ideasculptor Offline
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
I
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 17
It very much depends on the definition of 'self-taught.' Since it is impossible that someone, in this day and age, won't have watched youtube videos and consumed online writing about theory and technique, there is no such thing as truly self-taught in the way that someone playing along with recordings and reading sheet music on a family piano in the first half of the 20th century might have been self-taught. And even then, musicians had books, sheet music, and other writings to learn from.

Personally, I work as a professional keyboard player playing jazz, blues, and rock music and I am largely self taught. I had piano lessons at an early age, which gave me some fundamentals about theory and reading music, but I retained nothing of technique when I came back to piano at age 14. I could barely read music very slowly, and I could demonstrate a C major scale, but that's about it. And that lack of education was fairly evident in my technique for decades, until I got really serious about learning how to play the instrument well.

I had a natural ear for improv and I seemed able to translate my skills in math to music very ably, such that I was able to understand music theory in college theory courses at a pace that totally outstripped my classmates, despite having had absolutely no training in music theory after the age of 9 and not remembering a thing about it, but I didn't take any college piano courses because I didn't think I played well enough to justify pursuing performance coursework so I stuck to composition. My left hand was never as independent as I wanted it to be, and neither hand had the speed or dexterity that I really wanted, but endless hours playing along with records as a teen did have their impact and I played pretty well in an improvisational context. Fortunately, spectacular piano technique isn't really needed to garner work as a performing musician in jazz, blues, and pop forms, though it certainly doesn't hurt. It's much more about what you choose to play than how you play it.

When I finally did buckle down and get serious about polishing up my technique, I was able to make really significant progress by just working my way through standard classical piano pegagogy - Hanon, Pischna, and the standard canon of classical piano music that I, quite literally, borrowed from the syllabus of the Royal Conservatory. I just worked my way through the requirements of each grade, generally tripling or quadrupling the requirements of each exam (if the exam required 1 piece from each section, I learned 3 or 4). I'm no concert pianist, by any means, and I'm sure someone would look at me playing and be able to point to all kinds of imperfections in how I do things, but I certainly play pretty well, and I've never really had a formal piano lesson that covered technique. I've sat side by side with some phenomenal jazz performers and watched them play from the bench, while being able to ask questions (though most would respond with a shrug if I asked them to tell me about why they were making the choices they made), and I've sat in some jazz piano and organ masterclasses over the years, but that's really the limit of the formal education that I've had, exactly none of which focused on technique or my playing. But I've watched countless hours of youtube videos in the years since youtube became a thing, and I've enrolled in various online music courses over the years, though the only one that really offered significant gains for me was the material presented at openstudiojazz.com (Peter Martin and Adam Maness, largely). I spent 5 intensive days with Dr Lonnie Smith in a masterclass, and another year consuming the videos I made over his shoulder during that week.

To my mind, that's exactly the kind of resume I'd expect someone who calls themselves 'self-taught' to have, but I'm not trying to pretend that I've never learned a single thing from another person. My progression (and sometimes lack thereof) as a pianist was driven by choices I made and hours of practice I put in without direct feedback from a teacher. I refer to myself as a self-taught pianist all the time, and I don't think I'm being dishonest when I do so. I don't deny that I took a year of theory classes at city college or that I had a couple of years of (absolutely miserable) classical piano lessons as a little kid, but those things don't really factor into my abilities as a pianist any more than elementary school arithmetic factors into a Fields Medal winner's qualification as a math prodigy.

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Juan Rezzuto] #2947373 02/15/20 07:46 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
L
Lady Bird Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
It is difficult to relate a keyboard jazz player to a classical pianists style and technique.
Keyboard players often stand and play for example That means the arm and wrist are up.
In Classical playing the wrist is much lower.,As much in line with the hand.The fingers are
taught to move ,and be independent.
Also if you played classical music ,a self taught person would probably have major problems
with correct fingering and the correct use of the thumb.Keeping the hand from moving around
is another major problem.

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: pianoloverus] #2947381 02/15/20 07:57 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 206
3
3am_stargazing Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
3
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 206
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Rickster
Fact is, I'm sure there are successful performing artists from both camps, although I think classical music is more of a formal study requirement, although there are likely exceptions there also.
I don't know about non classical pianists, but as far as classical pianists go there have been virtually no high level professional pianists who are/were self taught. Godowsky might be the only exception...I don't know for sure.

There are half-way cases though, such as John Ogden.

Ogden wasn't completely "self-taught", in the sense that he had lessons as a child, and then as an adult.

E.g. He had piano lessons from age 3-10.

But he had no piano lessons between the ages of 10-16

So a large part of his development (i.e. during some of the most formative years for a pianist, which are between the ages of 10-16) was self-taught.

Last edited by 3am_stargazing; 02/15/20 07:57 PM.

M-Audio Keystation 49 | Casio PX-S1000 | Yamaha HS8 studio monitors
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Lady Bird] #2947391 02/15/20 08:21 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 206
3
3am_stargazing Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
3
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 206
Originally Posted by Lady Bird
It is difficult to relate a keyboard jazz player to a classical pianists style and technique.
Keyboard players often stand and play for example That means the arm and wrist are up.
In Classical playing the wrist is much lower.,As much in line with the hand.The fingers are
taught to move ,and be independent.
Also if you played classical music ,a self taught person would probably have major problems
with correct fingering and the correct use of the thumb.Keeping the hand from moving around
is another major problem.

I think 90% of keyboardists just had normal piano lessons growing up. It's the keyboard part of their skillset (i.e. arranging and production) which was usually self-taught.

Also the difficulty level is higher with the unweighted keys - i.e. it's harder to play something that sounds good on unweighted keys, than on weighted keys.

So someone who can sound good on unweighted keys, will sound a lot better on the piano.

That's why people are impressed with guys like Jesus Molina who can play in a virtuoso way on unweighted keyboards (while if he was just doing on the piano, I wouldn't be that impressed with him).


M-Audio Keystation 49 | Casio PX-S1000 | Yamaha HS8 studio monitors
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Learux] #2947393 02/15/20 08:24 PM
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 13
M
MarianneØ Offline
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
M
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 13
Originally Posted by Learux


Can a pianist be self-taught? Yes, to a very rudimentary level.



I've only been on this forum two days, and they're already talking about me?

- Marianne "Ten clumsiest fingers in the West."


First love: Kawai GX-6
Yamaha Motif XF8
Tektronix MSO4104
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: 3am_stargazing] #2947397 02/15/20 08:27 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 23,518
BruceD Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 23,518
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
[...]
So someone who can sound good on unweighted keys, will sound a lot better on the piano.

[...] guys like Jesus Molina who can play in a virtuoso way on unweighted keyboards (while if he was just doing on the piano, I wouldn't be that impressed with him).


Aren't you contradicting yourself here?

Regards,


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Juan Rezzuto] #2947399 02/15/20 08:40 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
L
Lady Bird Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
Well you may get away with 3 fingers jumping around a keyboard with some kind of "back up"
but you never will with (even) with a classical piece of intermediate difficult on a accoustic piano .
"The devil is in the details "unfortunately.

Last edited by Lady Bird; 02/15/20 08:42 PM. Reason: Spelling
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: 3am_stargazing] #2947400 02/15/20 08:47 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
L
Lady Bird Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Rickster
Fact is, I'm sure there are successful performing artists from both camps, although I think classical music is more of a formal study requirement, although there are likely exceptions there also.
I don't know about non classical pianists, but as far as classical pianists go there have been virtually no high level professional pianists who are/were self taught. Godowsky might be the only exception...I don't know for sure.

There are half-way cases though, such as John Ogden.

Ogden wasn't completely "self-taught", in the sense that he had lessons as a child, and then as an adult.

E.g. He had piano lessons from age 3-10.

But he had no piano lessons between the ages of 10-16

So a large part of his development (i.e. during some of the most formative years for a pianist, which are between the ages of 10-16) was self-taught.

He was probably extremely advanced then at 10.

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: MarianneØ] #2947406 02/15/20 09:05 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
L
Lady Bird Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
Originally Posted by MarianneØ
Originally Posted by Learux


Can a pianist be self-taught? Yes, to a very rudimentary level.



I've only been on this forum two days, and they're already talking about me?

- Marianne "Ten clumsiest fingers in the West."

I am sure you are being modest Marianne .You probably will surprise us one day
with a recording.

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Lady Bird] #2947408 02/15/20 09:15 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,907
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,907
Originally Posted by Lady Bird
Originally Posted by 3am_stargazing

There are half-way cases though, such as John Ogden.

Ogden wasn't completely "self-taught", in the sense that he had lessons as a child, and then as an adult.

E.g. He had piano lessons from age 3-10.

But he had no piano lessons between the ages of 10-16

So a large part of his development (i.e. during some of the most formative years for a pianist, which are between the ages of 10-16) was self-taught.

He was probably extremely advanced then at 10.

The respected composer-pianist Ronald Stevenson (his best-known piano piece: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSdrSeRbTqI) recalled the nine-year-old Ogdon performing on the Royal Manchester College of Music's concert platform: Little John played Chopin's Heroic Polonaise, amazing the other students (most of them twice his age): "If you closed your eyes, you could have had no doubt that you were listening to a fully-fledged virtuoso."

Another student at the time, Harold Taylor (who became a concert pianist and teacher), heard the kid sight-reading through Brahms's first piano concerto through a half-open door in the college: not someone feeling his way through a new piece but "a performance, with all the technical and musical accomplishment that the word implies."

The educational system in England then didn't allow Ogdon to keep taking a day off a week to continue his studies at the RMCM from ten to sixteen, when he was at Manchester Grammar School (which had no music department, unlike my grammar school when I was a kid learning piano). It was hardly surprising that John's later teachers were concerned about his lack of keyboard discipline and the strain of unruliness that marked his playing.

(The above info is from Charles Beauclerk's biography of Ogdon: "Piano Man - A life of John Ogdon")


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Juan Rezzuto] #2947434 02/15/20 11:05 PM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 4,935
Jeff Clef Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 4,935
We can and do self-teach. The thing about working with a teacher is, that it's a big timesaver. A student can reach a point where he or she can learn from scores and recordings, both so much more available now than they were when I was a young student, from working with a teacher. This is so great.

A teacher can teach you how to learn, one of the biggest factors being that you learn how much work it takes to get a new piece off the runway. You really have to put in the hours, either way, self- or teacher-taught.

With a teacher, you don't have to reinvent the whole course of music history and pedagogy. You are put where you need to be, and showed how.

With self-study, you don't have to put up with the annoying features some teachers can have (present company excepted, Bruce), or the commute, or the expense. Not that I haven't done all that, and have been happy to do it, and have felt that it was highly worthwhile. Still. I'm just saying, some teachers can be just a little overbearing, or just a little peculiar. Some have the gift of meeting a student where he or she is and starting in the right place, right away. Others, not so much.

I'm sure they have to overlook a lot from students, too. What can save the whole thing is, if both student and teacher have a BIG love for music, and a really big love for the piano, and are not too awful a mismatch of temperament. Even in a sub-optimal case, it can work out for a pretty long time. My first teacher seemed to kind of lose me over the years, and then gave up, telling me, "Most people who don't learn how to play by the time they're 16, usually don't ever learn." As awful as that is, I think she was telling me the best she knew, and she was a scrupulously honest woman, if a little taciturn. Maybe she was a little rusty. Very possibly, she had a point. However, I did continue to learn. How I would love to have her as my teacher at this end of my life, now that I know better how special her gift was, and have some grasp of how to work effectively with a teacher... and how to learn on my own.

A foot in both worlds.


Clef

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: bennevis] #2947440 02/15/20 11:32 PM
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 13
M
MarianneØ Offline
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
M
Joined: Feb 2020
Posts: 13
Originally Posted by bennevis

There are half-way cases though, such as John Ogden.
. . .
"Another student at the time, Harold Taylor (who became a concert pianist and teacher), heard the kid sight-reading through Brahms's first piano concerto through a half-open door in the college: not someone feeling his way through a new piece but "a performance, with all the technical and musical accomplishment that the word implies."


Ogdon's sight-reading genius is simply beyond belief. Robert Estrin of Living Pianos did a video about John, which you can see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AymBmDHBO0U

By the way, isn't Chopin considered to have been at least largely self-taught? I know he had a few years of music studies prior to age 20, but most of his keyboard prowess was a result of his individual efforts.


First love: Kawai GX-6
Yamaha Motif XF8
Tektronix MSO4104
Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Jeff Clef] #2947442 02/15/20 11:36 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
L
Lady Bird Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
Originally Posted by Jeff Clef
We can and do self-teach. The thing about working with a teacher is, that it's a big timesaver. A student can reach a point where he or she can learn from scores and recordings, both so much more available now than they were when I was a young student, from working with a teacher. This is so great.

A teacher can teach you how to learn, one of the biggest factors being that you learn how much work it takes to get a new piece off the runway. You really have to put in the hours, either way, self- or teacher-taught.

With a teacher, you don't have to reinvent the whole course of music history and pedagogy. You are put where you need to be, and showed how.

With self-study, you don't have to put up with the annoying features some teachers can have (present company excepted, Bruce), or the commute, or the expense. Not that I haven't done all that, and have been happy to do it, and have felt that it was highly worthwhile. Still. I'm just saying, some teachers can be just a little overbearing, or just a little peculiar. Some have the gift of meeting a student where he or she is and starting in the right place, right away. Others, not so much.

I'm sure they have to overlook a lot from students, too. What can save the whole thing is, if both student and teacher have a BIG love for music, and a really big love for the piano, and are not too awful a mismatch of temperament. Even in a sub-optimal case, it can work out for a pretty long time. My first teacher seemed to kind of lose me over the years, and then gave up, telling me, "Most people who don't learn how to play by the time they're 16, usually don't ever learn." As awful as that is, I think she was telling me the best she knew, and she was a scrupulously honest woman, if a little taciturn. Maybe she was a little rusty. Very possibly, she had a point. However, I did continue to learn. How I would love to have her as my teacher at this end of my life, now that I know better how special her gift was, and have some grasp of how to work effectively with a teacher... and how to learn on my own.

A foot in both worlds.

Yes ,yes.......and believe me I have taught students to love the piano as well. This thread is about people learning the piano completely on thier own.Rickster has shown that this is possible in popular music.In classical some of us are saying this is not possible.

Re: Can pianists be self-taught? [Re: Juan Rezzuto] #2947444 02/15/20 11:47 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
L
Lady Bird Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
L
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 3,748
It is interesting that the OP is a CONCERT PIANIST.

Last edited by Lady Bird; 02/15/20 11:48 PM. Reason: Missing word
Page 2 of 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Moderated by  Ken Knapp, Piano World 

What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Our January 2020 Newsletter Available Online Now...
Free Piano Newsletter
----------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Kawai GX6 BLK Opinions
by Jon Albert - 02/27/20 12:06 AM
Musescore on (any) Linux computer
by FrankCox - 02/26/20 11:06 PM
Wandering 5th Finger
by dobro - 02/26/20 08:57 PM
Assembly of digital pianos
by abcxyz - 02/26/20 07:11 PM
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics197,204
Posts2,930,498
Members96,127
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3