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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2944949 02/09/20 10:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Tenor1
Sure love your discipline once you got back to the piano. It’s funny how life gets in the way of what you probably wanted all along. There’s just not enough hours in the day to do everything.


Thanks. I've tried to make it part of my daily routine. Discipline is better than motivation, but habit is better than either. Having said that, I know I'm quite fortunate that my life is such that I have the luxury to indulge my hobby. I try to show my gratitude to Fortune by taking full advantage of it!


Decent upright bassist; aspiring decent pianist
Present: Roland DP-603, Roland FP-30, Casio CDP-130
On Order: Yamaha MX61
Past: Casio PX-830, Casio PX-160
Etc.: PianoTeq Stage 6 (Bechstein, Bluethner, U4, Vibes, Xylo), Roland KC-80
Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945164 02/10/20 02:14 PM
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I had several lessons at age 5 but didn't get very far. Soon after learning to play "Twinkle", the acoustic piano was out of the house and never seen again. A cousin tried to teach me a song with repeated L chords out of a beginner's book. The hand coordination for playing several notes at a time was too hard.

In my school days I learned to play violin and continue to play with a music group. I learned music theory in class but never imagined I would be playing a piano. 2 decades later I watched a man demonstrate how to play a few Pop tunes and decided to buy a keyboard. The first few years I relied on info on the Internet before getting a teacher.

I started with a 61 soft-touch keyboard. After a few years of tracking my progress, I upgraded to a 76 and then an 88 with weighed keys. I was a latecomer in the family after a few people already took piano lessons and passed conservatory exams.

Many years ago a friend of the family brought their 2 sons who were in Suzuki piano & violin. They played a few pieces in our living room with a small keyboard & violin and later performed at their grandfather's funeral. Suzuki proposed that children needs to start music at a young age (before 10). Suzuki the violin teacher / educator lived in the last century before the Internet. He had trouble picking up German while living in Germany and assumed that it'd be easier for kids to learn new skills. His methods seemed so revolutionary in the past but some of his ideas seem out-dated today. Now we're seeing many adults learn to speak foreign languages and get into playing music. A few decades ago I was stuck in the age-old thinking that it'd be difficult / almost impossible to get into playing piano as an adult.

A Bach fugue? 30 years ago probably not. Today I practice music for at least an hour a day. Whether I'm doing a sonata, fugue or concerto it's just another piece that I'm working on.

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945195 02/10/20 03:43 PM
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Musical background?

Started organ lessons from age 5-10 ish (I think). Learned and played clarinet in high school at age 12-17. Taught self piano from 12-21. Took my first official piano class at 21 years of age at the Boston University School for Fine Arts with a young graduate student who took special interest in my playing and really encouraged me to continue my studies.

Enrolled in a renowned program at Longy School of Music at 22 that gave quality French Conservatory training to those who were interested. We were placed alongside music students who were earning their degrees in music. (Unfortunately this program was ended with quite a bit of controversy in Boston https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/m...public/vTaEnfBQjCUGgxOD9j0siN/story.html). At the same time I was earning my graduate degrees so I had to stop the lessons because I couldn't devote time to both pursuits. I think at this time I audited a music theory course at Boston University's School for FIne Arts.

Moved back to New York City after earning my degrees and enrolled at the Brooklyn Queens Conservatory of Music for a couple of years in their community program and then attended the Bloomingdale School of Music in Manhattan when I had to change jobs. Attended these programs for about 2-3 years in total.

Then a big lapse of several decades in my music studies- moving to Florida, getting married, starting a medical practice and for the last two years I have found this neighborhood academy in the ourskirts of Tampa that I think is just wonderful and offering me the education I need at 51 years of age with just wonderful teachers. The quality of education I think is on par with the conservatories I attended in Boston and New York City.

I play classical music mostly but was very eclectic in my music choices when I was younger. Played a lot by ear mostly in my early youth and probably new more music theory then I give myself credit for looking back. For me it is all about the journey. I still consider myself a beginner because I feel I have a lot to learn but I can carry a tune. My goal just to eventually reach a point where I am the best pianist that I can be and work it around the other "stuff" I do in life to keep a roof over our heads and enough money to retire on. After all these years I can confidently say I have an innate love for music and it has stayed with me through all the ups and downs like a dear old friend.


Working on:

Bach/Busoni Chaconne in D minor BWV 1004
Preludio: Bach/Rachmaninoff E Major Sonata for Violin
Chopin: G Minor Ballade


Shigeru Kawai SK2
Kawai VPC-1
Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945326 02/10/20 09:09 PM
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Well, as there's nothing much happening elsewhere, I might as well re-hash (for the nth time) my checkered history of how I came to be here, playing pianos and owning a digital smirk . (Though I long ago lost interest in discussing digitals, as nothing changes.....)

Nothing unusual in fact - I was started on piano lessons at ten because it was the done thing to do, just like Ms Austen was expected to tinkle the ivories in her time wink (it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a clueless kid in possession of ten functioning fingers, must be in want of piano lessons), and soon left the world of pop songs behind (the only world I knew, or heard of until then), and embarked on the exploration of the classical music world through the medium of a box of percussion masquerading as a 'singing' musical instrument. Or a box of electronic trickery masquerading as said singing musical instrument.

Ten years of non-stop piano lessons (except for during school holidays) proved that even with all the musical aptitude of a gnat, it is possible to gain some semblance of fluency in tickling the ivories, as long as there is unbridled enthusiasm and a love for music. Persistence and passion trumps over lousy genes, as Confucius would say (even if he didn't know about the existence of genes).

Decades out in the wilderness followed the end of lessons (and teenhood) where I scrabbled around for any piano I could find to play, until the prodigal son (though no prodigy) finally settled down and bought a digital. As hard-earned skills returned, an invitation came to perform a recital - on an acoustic grand - on a monthly basis, so I found a new purpose in playing, and in learning new pieces.

The circle is complete....well, almost, for who knows when it will be squared? whistle


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
bennevis #2945332 02/10/20 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Well, as there's nothing much happening elsewhere, I might as well re-hash (for the nth time) my checkered history of how I came to be here, playing pianos and owning a digital smirk . (Though I long ago lost interest in discussing digitals, as nothing changes.....)

Nothing unusual in fact - I was started on piano lessons at ten because it was the done thing to do, just like Ms Austen was expected to tinkle the ivories in her time wink (it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a clueless kid in possession of ten functioning fingers, must be in want of piano lessons), and soon left the world of pop songs behind (the only world I knew, or heard of until then), and embarked on the exploration of the classical music world through the medium of a box of percussion masquerading as a 'singing' musical instrument. Or a box of electronic trickery masquerading as said singing musical instrument.

Ten years of non-stop piano lessons (except for during school holidays) proved that even with all the musical aptitude of a gnat, it is possible to gain some semblance of fluency in tickling the ivories, as long as there is unbridled enthusiasm and a love for music. Persistence and passion trumps over lousy genes, as Confucius would say (even if he didn't know about the existence of genes).

Decades out in the wilderness followed the end of lessons (and teenhood) where I scrabbled around for any piano I could find to play, until the prodigal son (though no prodigy) finally settled down and bought a digital. As hard-earned skills returned, an invitation came to perform a recital - on an acoustic grand - on a monthly basis, so I found a new purpose in playing, and in learning new pieces.

The circle is complete....well, almost, for who knows when it will be squared? whistle


Seems that the Miss. Bennets added a musical brother to the fold. Pray chance do you sing and play as well? That was the fashion of the time. Although I sing in choirs I’ve never accompanied myself. I suspect I would be more like Mary Bennet.



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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Jethro #2945335 02/10/20 09:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Jethro
Musical background?

Started organ lessons from age 5-10 ish (I think). Learned and played clarinet in high school at age 12-17. Taught self piano from 12-21. Took my first official piano class at 21 years of age at the Boston University School for Fine Arts with a young graduate student who took special interest in my playing and really encouraged me to continue my studies.

Enrolled in a renowned program at Longy School of Music at 22 that gave quality French Conservatory training to those who were interested. We were placed alongside music students who were earning their degrees in music. (Unfortunately this program was ended with quite a bit of controversy in Boston https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/m...public/vTaEnfBQjCUGgxOD9j0siN/story.html). At the same time I was earning my graduate degrees so I had to stop the lessons because I couldn't devote time to both pursuits. I think at this time I audited a music theory course at Boston University's School for FIne Arts.

Moved back to New York City after earning my degrees and enrolled at the Brooklyn Queens Conservatory of Music for a couple of years in their community program and then attended the Bloomingdale School of Music in Manhattan when I had to change jobs. Attended these programs for about 2-3 years in total.

Then a big lapse of several decades in my music studies- moving to Florida, getting married, starting a medical practice and for the last two years I have found this neighborhood academy in the ourskirts of Tampa that I think is just wonderful and offering me the education I need at 51 years of age with just wonderful teachers. The quality of education I think is on par with the conservatories I attended in Boston and New York City.

I play classical music mostly but was very eclectic in my music choices when I was younger. Played a lot by ear mostly in my early youth and probably new more music theory then I give myself credit for looking back. For me it is all about the journey. I still consider myself a beginner because I feel I have a lot to learn but I can carry a tune. My goal just to eventually reach a point where I am the best pianist that I can be and work it around the other "stuff" I do in life to keep a roof over our heads and enough money to retire on. After all these years I can confidently say I have an innate love for music and it has stayed with me through all the ups and downs like a dear old friend.



How lucky to have a neighborhood academy to keep you on track. Many physicians play and you should look for a duet partner. There is a wealth of duet music. In the 19th and early 20th century most orchestral works were transcribed for piano duet. This allowed people in smaller cities access to what orchestras played in the larger cities. I had a duet partner years ago and it was a wonderful way to really learn orchestral scores. The Beethoven string quartets are available for piano duet. They are especially fun. I telling you this because I just discovered that I can now play duets on a DP piano simple by recording one part then play along with myself. I highly recommend you give it a try. In my early music group half the members are physicians, the other half physicists with me in the middle and leader, lol.



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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
thepianoplayer416 #2945336 02/10/20 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
I had several lessons at age 5 but didn't get very far. Soon after learning to play "Twinkle", the acoustic piano was out of the house and never seen again. A cousin tried to teach me a song with repeated L chords out of a beginner's book. The hand coordination for playing several notes at a time was too hard.

In my school days I learned to play violin and continue to play with a music group. I learned music theory in class but never imagined I would be playing a piano. 2 decades later I watched a man demonstrate how to play a few Pop tunes and decided to buy a keyboard. The first few years I relied on info on the Internet before getting a teacher.

I started with a 61 soft-touch keyboard. After a few years of tracking my progress, I upgraded to a 76 and then an 88 with weighed keys. I was a latecomer in the family after a few people already took piano lessons and passed conservatory exams.

Many years ago a friend of the family brought their 2 sons who were in Suzuki piano & violin. They played a few pieces in our living room with a small keyboard & violin and later performed at their grandfather's funeral. Suzuki proposed that children needs to start music at a young age (before 10). Suzuki the violin teacher / educator lived in the last century before the Internet. He had trouble picking up German while living in Germany and assumed that it'd be easier for kids to learn new skills. His methods seemed so revolutionary in the past but some of his ideas seem out-dated today. Now we're seeing many adults learn to speak foreign languages and get into playing music. A few decades ago I was stuck in the age-old thinking that it'd be difficult / almost impossible to get into playing piano as an adult.

A Bach fugue? 30 years ago probably not. Today I practice music for at least an hour a day. Whether I'm doing a sonata, fugue or concerto it's just another piece that I'm working on.


We’ve got something in common. Violin is also my second instrument. I played with community orchestras for a few years, but rarely play these days. My bows need restringing. The mites really did a number on them.



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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945340 02/10/20 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Tenor1

Seems that the Miss. Bennets added a musical brother to the fold. Pray chance do you sing and play as well? That was the fashion of the time. Although I sing in choirs I’ve never accompanied myself. I suspect I would be more like Mary Bennet.

Yes, like the Bennet sisters, I do pride myself on singing (Schubert et al) very badly while accompanying myself - on piano or guitar.

But that's because I can't get Lizzie to sing for me. (My days of singing bass in Jesu, meine Freude - or even Gurrelieder - are long over, and my voice no longer has the croaky but burnished lustre of old, because I'm, er, old. cry)


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945353 02/10/20 11:58 PM
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I started off with electric guitar lessons at age 12. I can still remember sitting in a row, with other students, on metal chairs and getting shocked every time the guy next to you touched you with his guitar neck. We played boring music that I wasn't interested in and I quit after 2 years.

Fast forward a few years and I'm looking for something to while away the lonely hours on a USMC base. I bought an old beater acoustic guitar and began to teach myself to play. Along the way I realized that I could sing, so I became the barracks troubadour. Being a fledgling singer/songwriter also attracted the girl of my dreams, who I quickly married, before she could come to her senses. 50 years later and I'm still singing to her.

I made a couple of stabs at getting recorded but I just wasn't good enough. This was in the early 1970's so no youtube. I was worship leader for a church for 15 years, but as it grew, and they added more musicians, I felt out of my depth as I had never learned to read music. I resigned and went about my life, building houses and raising a family. I taught myself to play other instruments; fiddle, mandolin, banjo and even tried the uilleann pipes. I played folk, country, blues, Irish and just about anything except classical. I just never cared for classical except for a few pieces by Debussy. I played with friends on occasion but generally just for myself and family.

When I turned 67 my hands/fingers started hurting when playing guitar and other stringed instruments. I decided to get a DP and see if that would allow me to keep making music. I taught myself to play and began to see how logical the keyboard was. I was back in business, playing and singing again. After a couple of years, I longed for an acoustic instrument again and ended up buying an acoustic grand. It's even easier on my hands.

There you have it; the life story of a musical illiterate with ADHD. Ha! Fortunately, my son learned from my mistakes and is an accomplished musician and is married to a beautiful lady with a piano degree who teaches piano.

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945359 02/11/20 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Tenor1
We’ve got something in common. Violin is also my second instrument. I played with community orchestras for a few years, but rarely play these days. My bows need restringing. The mites really did a number on them.


Most people in my community orchestra carry an extra set of strings just in case. My old $100 bow from Germany is still my best. I also carry a backup bow in the case. It's a half-price bow from Korea I call an Asian knock off. If the backup needs to be re-stringed, I'd get another knock off since it'd cost as much to get the bow serviced.

In my school days I listened to piano pieces on the radio but would never dream of getting into playing. Sometime ago a cousin noticed that I was typing at 60 WPM on a computer keyboard and said that my hand movements looked like someone playing piano. She took piano lessons while I was still playing violin. I wasn't ready for piano at age 5, 15 or 25. It would be another decade before I finally got into it. As an adult learner, everybody in my family would say I'm too old to start. With a keyboard at home at least I can use headphones or take it to another room when I want to practice in private.

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
thepianoplayer416 #2945381 02/11/20 03:01 AM
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Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
Originally Posted by Tenor1
We’ve got something in common. Violin is also my second instrument. I played with community orchestras for a few years, but rarely play these days. My bows need restringing. The mites really did a number on them.


Most people in my community orchestra carry an extra set of strings just in case. My old $100 bow from Germany is still my best. I also carry a backup bow in the case. It's a half-price bow from Korea I call an Asian knock off. If the backup needs to be re-stringed, I'd get another knock off since it'd cost as much to get the bow serviced.

In my school days I listened to piano pieces on the radio but would never dream of getting into playing. Sometime ago a cousin noticed that I was typing at 60 WPM on a computer keyboard and said that my hand movements looked like someone playing piano. She took piano lessons while I was still playing violin. I wasn't ready for piano at age 5, 15 or 25. It would be another decade before I finally got into it. As an adult learner, everybody in my family would say I'm too old to start. With a keyboard at home at least I can use headphones or take it to another room when I want to practice in private.


I meant my bows needed rehairing. I've got a really nice bow from Brazil. Years ago the government stopped the export of pernambuco wood, which all the bow makers want. So some of them went to Brazil and opened bowls workshops. They are making some very high quality bows. I love doing playing chamber musical.



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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945581 02/11/20 03:35 PM
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I am pianist-improviser, composer, computer scientist (machine learning, semantics), professional programmer, have some awards in music composition contests. Native Russian speaker, almost 70 years old, live in Israel. Started playing piano immediately after the birth or maybe earlier - do not remember that period well... Left-handed, which drastically affects the way of thinking and the music. My Composers Forum homepage:

https://composersforum.ning.com/profile/AndrewG

Note that the flash player in this page works in PC and MAC but may not work in some smartphones.

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Andrew_G #2945589 02/11/20 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew_G
I am pianist-improviser, composer, computer scientist (machine learning, semantics), professional programmer, have some awards in music composition contests. Native Russian speaker, almost 70 years old, live in Israel. Started playing piano immediately after the birth or maybe earlier - do not remember that period well... Left-handed, which drastically affects the way of thinking and the music. My Composers Forum homepage:

https://composersforum.ning.com/profile/AndrewG

Note that the flash player in this page works in PC and MAC but may not work in some smartphones.


Another Renaissance man here on the forum. Your accomplishments are fantastic! My grandmother was born in Russia then fled to Shanghai in 1917. My mother spoke fluent Russian and now I only know the food by name.

On your site it mentions the sound links above, but there was nothing above to hear.



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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2945596 02/11/20 04:28 PM
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@Tenor1, if you are on PC or Mac, you should see the "Click to Enable Adobe Flash Player" button. Please double-click the button, and you will see the list of songs.
I am afraid this will not work on a smartphone or a similar device...

Some sporadic tracks can be heard here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykLlIp-qYhI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XR9hEL84lKM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bFeCiN1FaI
https://www.facebook.com/pg/gleibmanmusic/posts/

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Andrew_G #2945708 02/11/20 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew_G
@Tenor1, if you are on PC or Mac, you should see the "Click to Enable Adobe Flash Player" button. Please double-click the button, and you will see the list of songs.
I am afraid this will not work on a smartphone or a similar device...

Some sporadic tracks can be heard here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykLlIp-qYhI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XR9hEL84lKM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bFeCiN1FaI
https://www.facebook.com/pg/gleibmanmusic/posts/



Thank you for the posted links. I saw those on the original site, but none would open for me. I could open all of these and each piece is very beautiful. Thanks for sharing them with me.



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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2946270 02/13/20 08:32 AM
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Always in the shadows, time to 'fess up to my grubby musical past.

As a 5-year old I had neither the grace nor insight to realise I should have thanked my parents for packing me off to piano lessons, continuing with only passive enthusiasm for around a further ten years and capping that off with mutinous knee-jerk when realising grade 5 theory (mandatory for those wanting to continue through the UK grades) couldn't explain what it was about Previn's jazz playing that caught my attention. Then one day, I turned up to a lesson with some Brubeck transcription books mistakenly packed instead of the Czerny (or some such) I was meant to practice. Scorn was heaped upon me for my waywardness. That humiliation and impending school certificate exams were the perfect excuse to butt out of future lessons and with my interest in jazz fired up I set about transcribing things I wanted to mimic - difficult at first but got easier. At around the same time I started playing with a couple of hopeless amateur pop groups led by one school friend or another who'd started to learn the guitar 24 hours earlier.

Then on to study maths/physics at uni, finding a decent rhythm section there and spending way to much time playing in a jazz trio. Hence scraped my degree and went on to teach science at a local comprehensive where, six months in, I was duly upbraided by the head of department for not pulling my weight. Realizing it wasn't for me I contacted my ex-uni trio buddies to gauge interest in forming a new band. We all liked jazz-rock (subsequently 'fusion') found a guitarist, my girl friend sang, bought a used Hammond B3 and after brief but intense rehearsing hustled a few gigs, at the same time inviting various A&R guys to see us - always hungry and shifty-eyed, London was swarming with them. We got an album deal - not that difficult when commitment trumped talent. With a promotional team setting up tours we had mid-tier success but imploded the way a lot of touring bands do through mutual dislike. Afterwards, depping with various gigging and recording bands I got a call out of the blue from the producer of my first band's album to play piano on some recording sessions for the then charming and self-deprecating Larry Lurex. That was the start of 25 years in recording studios playing various keys and writing/recording orchestral overdubs for pop records. As it turned out, I would work for Larry again, renamed, and in a very different mood 14 years later.

At the millennium I had a bit of a crisis, deciding I wanted to leave London thus burning most of my professional bridges. Like most of the pop records I worked on, faded myself out and went to live abroad for a while. That was the beginning of a 10-year hiatus finally arrested by joining PW in a vain attempt to acquire the classical chops I never had in my youth. Now, relatively ancient, fatigued, lazy and with various infirmities slowing me down I know it to be a lost cause. Doesn't stop me noodling though.

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2946279 02/13/20 09:09 AM
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^ dire_tonic, very interesting and respectable story. Seems like it's not very uncommon for musicians to have also careers in physics, IT and science. And BTW, I had to check who Larry Lurex is. Mind blowing! I was 12 when Freddy Mercury died which sparked a sudden and renewed interest in Queen around the world and so it became also the first music I consciously liked, the first cassette I have myself copied was a Queens's Best and for 1-2 years it was the only music I listened to and admired before my Bach obsession started (described above). Must have been fascinating to work with such a genius.


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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2946323 02/13/20 11:06 AM
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@ dire tonic

Interesting read. Thanks for sharing.

God Bless,
David


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Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
Tenor1 #2946390 02/13/20 01:26 PM
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@dire tonic

Cool story. Your playing of Brubeck's "It's a Raggy Waltz" (on youtube) is really amazing. Looks effortless, which just shows hpow great your efforts are. A really nice example of a swinging sound with some angularity and sharp corners (my impressions, not based on any deep knowledge of music theory).....

Quick follow-up on your work with Queen: you shared an academic background with a certain Bryan May, who, as an astrophysicist and rockstar, is a hero to amateur astronomers like myself (see, astronomers really ARE cool!). Just wondering if the topic of physics ever came up, as you both came to music by way of physics....

Re: Getting To Know You: Musically
dire tonic #2946462 02/13/20 05:17 PM
Joined: Dec 2009
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Originally Posted by dire tonic
....I got a call out of the blue from the producer of my first band's album to play piano on some recording sessions for the then charming and self-deprecating Larry Lurex.


Ooh, interesting! I don't suppose this was at Trident Studios? If so, did you lay hands on the famous Bechstein? And if yes, and yes, did you work with Robin Geoffrey Cable?

I enjoyed your post. I would imagine you could write considerably more and not tell the whole story!


C. Bechstein Model B | Roland RD-1000 |
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