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Where do I even begin? Polish old pieces. Practice/learn pieces more effectively (even slower than before). Fix my mistakes before moving on. Learn at least 1 scale a week. Finish Widmung. Get started with Widmung. Read through the theory book I purchased 1 year ago with the inattention of reading it 1 year ago. Learn Reverie, Deux Arabesque.


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Preludio: Bach/Rachmaninoff E Major Sonata for Violin
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Originally Posted by offkey
Originally Posted by treefrog
By the end of 2020 I’d simply like to be able to say "I play piano".


Curious when most people here allowed themselves to say that to others.


Indeed. I don´t wanna say. I want to play. smile


I don´t want to learn how to play a music. I´m developing a way to play them all.
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Originally Posted by Josh1770
Originally Posted by AssociateX


There are at least 3 piano meet up groups here in New York City, and one on Long Island run by Dan Fogel,a Suffolk County piano teacher. Highly recommend checking these out for social gatherings and inspiring performances!


Thanks AssociateX. I will check them out. I used to go to one meetup in the city but people just took turns playing and that's where it ended. Not much sharing or just general communication. The one time I joined them for a drink I tried to talk about piano stuff and got no interest. It might sound funny to say on a piano forum where so many people share their experiences and are very helpful, but in my experience, piano players just don't like to "talk piano". I've been wondering about this for many years, especially after watching what happens when two guitarists find themselves in the same room. They will talk about anything and everything guitar. Piano players can be abrupt, disinterested in conversation, introverted, and often appear annoyed by questions. I might write a new post one day about this phenomenon. I can't be the only one who's noticed.


Oh thats a shame, there are 3 active piano groups (I co-organize 1 of them actually which is meeting this Sunday) and there is definitely 1 group where everyone just gets up and plays and there isnt much time for feedback afterward unless you go for drinks/dinner w/ some members. There is 1 group which is very socially active and everyone goes to a bar next door and talks shop. It really depends on who shows up and when, and also what type of conversation you're looking for - if you're looking for ideas for repertoire it can be great, but if you're looking for informal teaching advice or help with technique - not so much because that type of stuff should really be sought from a teacher and a piano meetup group isn't conducive to getting into substantive detail when there are so many performers and only 1 piano/1 or 2 hours of playing time.

Last edited by AssociateX; 01/15/20 11:14 AM.

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Originally Posted by AssociateX


Oh thats a shame, there are 3 active piano groups (I co-organize 1 of them actually which is meeting this Sunday) and there is definitely 1 group where everyone just gets up and plays and there isnt much time for feedback afterward unless you go for drinks/dinner w/ some members. There is 1 group which is very socially active and everyone goes to a bar next door and talks shop. It really depends on who shows up and when, and also what type of conversation you're looking for - if you're looking for ideas for repertoire it can be great, but if you're looking for informal teaching advice or help with technique - not so much because that type of stuff should really be sought from a teacher and a piano meetup group isn't conducive to getting into substantive detail when there are so many performers and only 1 piano/1 or 2 hours of playing time.



Associate - I would like to explore the other meetups since I have only gone to one. It surprises me that "talking shop" when it comes to piano seems hard to come by. Not looking for teaching advice. I am actually friends with a piano teacher. But when I want to bounce some ideas off of him, he wants to sit at the piano. I tell him that I am not looking for a lesson, I just want to "talk piano" with somebody and share some of my thoughts, see what he thinks. But he can be awkward, he resorts to his first instinct that somebody asking about piano wants some free professional advice, and then gets distracted and switches the conversation to something off topic.

Have you ever seen two guitarists get together at a party? It's all about where to put the capo, dropped D's, how would Keith play it, Strats vs. Gibson, Mahogany vs. Maple, and then they're off in another room jamming. You lose them for hours. In my whole life I have never had a conversation with another piano player, about piano, that lasted more than five minutes, and didn't feel like the other person was looking to crawl into a hole. I just don't understand why that's so.


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Hi Josh
Maybe it is because piano is generally a solitary activity and therefore has a (generally) more introverted group than guitar? I have met a few pianists that love to talk about music and piano, but the percentage is quite small

Others may have a different experience and perspective.


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Originally Posted by dogperson
Maybe it is because piano is generally a solitary activity and therefore has a (generally) more introverted group than guitar? I have met a few pianists that love to talk about music and piano, but the percentage is quite small



D.P. - I am sure I am not the only person who has wondered this, but I will ask it anyway - are introverts drawn to the piano because it is a solitary instrument, or does playing piano turn kids into introverts?

All I know is that whenever we gathered around the fire on the beach or by the lake, and guys who brought their guitars to play Jim Croce or Don McLean always had the girls sitting a little closer to them. :-)


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Originally Posted by Josh1770
Originally Posted by dogperson
Maybe it is because piano is generally a solitary activity and therefore has a (generally) more introverted group than guitar? I have met a few pianists that love to talk about music and piano, but the percentage is quite small



D.P. - I am sure I am not the only person who has wondered this, but I will ask it anyway - are introverts drawn to the piano because it is a solitary instrument, or does playing piano turn kids into introverts?

There are plenty of highly extroverted extroverts who play the piano. And they found that piano is a good way to win friends and influence people. A prime example is Rubinstein.

I'm a highly introverted introvert who wouldn't say boo to a mouse (but I would to someone I dislike wink ), but I readily open up to people who have the same interests as I have - including classical music. In fact, many of my high school friends that I made music with (playing duets etc or singing in the choir) or played chess with would never have thought that I was in any way introverted, because I could talk non-stop and discuss with them ad nauseam about anything to do with classical music or chess.

The same applies today, in my old age.


Quote
All I know is that whenever we gathered around the fire on the beach or by the lake, and guys who brought their guitars to play Jim Croce or Don McLean always had the girls sitting a little closer to them. :-)

When I play guitar around the campfire, girl do tend to gather around to help with the singing (especially when I pretend I don't know the lyrics of Country Roads wink ), but they tend to be more impressed when I actually play the piano - even if I'm only vamping some accompaniment to a pop song, not throwing off Scarbo.

Though that might be because on the guitar, I can only strum chords, whereas on the piano, I can even manage Für Elise (by ear, of course).......


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Originally Posted by Josh1770
All I know is that whenever we gathered around the fire on the beach or by the lake, and guys who brought their guitars to play Jim Croce or Don McLean always had the girls sitting a little closer to them. :-)

I bet if you brought your piano to the fire on the beach or by the lake, they would sit around. wink


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Thanks bennevis, Tyrone. Good laughs, good times.


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To get back in to classical piano after a foray in to electronica, time off playing electric guitar in an orchestra and then recovering from health issues.

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Originally Posted by offkey
Originally Posted by treefrog
By the end of 2020 I’d simply like to be able to say "I play piano".


Curious when most people here allowed themselves to say that to others.


Allowed? smile You should start a separate thread on this.

I’d be happy to give my own definition of what constitutes being able to say "I play piano" but I don’t want to derail this thread.


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My goals for this year are focused on “getting out there” as a piano player and lessening my performance anxiety.

1. Actively participate in an online forum.
2. Play in public at least 20 times.
3. Play for my family every chance I get.
4. Take on the 40 piece challenge and post videos for each piece I learn.
5. Sight-read and practice technique daily.
6. Pass the RCM Level 3 exam.

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Originally Posted by SwissMS
2019 was a particularly difficult year for me, with some serious health set backs. The good news is 2020 should be better! This year I am taking a less aggressive approach to my playing and just enjoying piano. Therefore more goals are more modest.

1. Reclaim some of the pieces that I have previously learned over the last ten years, and build a repertoire.
2. Do the 40 piece challenge with these pieces and some some easy pieces.
3. Just have fun!


That's terrific about your health being better in 2020.


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I hope to learn piano for a year, save up enough money for a worship course, and learn to play a worship song at least,

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Good luck to everyone in achieving their goals this year.

Here are my goals for 2020:

1. Pass ARSM Diploma in May - Not too worried. I still have a lot of hard work ahead of me, but I should be fine.

2. Pass ABRSM Music Theory Grade 7 in June with a minimum score of Merit - Again, I'm not too worried, but still have a lot of hard work ahead of me.

3. Pass ABRSM Music Theory Grade 8 in November with a minimum score of Merit - A bit of a question mark. If I don't get at least a Merit on Grade 7 in June, then I'll have to "lick my calf again" as we used to say up in the mountains. The Grade 8 material looks straightforward, but I'm not going to dig in until after the Grade 7 exam.

4. Start work on my DipABRSM programme - I have already chosen the programme and have fiddled around with all the pieces, but not in much detail.

My Professor considers both my ARSM and DipABRSM programmes to be ambitious, but she's not particularly worried. It's actually the same set of composers for both programmes: Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, and Debussy.

I actually think my DipABRSM programme is, for the most part, easier than my ARSM programme. The only exception is the Debussy: I'm doing Debussy's Bruyères for ARSM, and La puerta del vino for DipABRSM. Bruyères is a Grade 8 piece but La puerta del vino is definitely diploma level...


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My goals for 2020:

  • Learn (more precisely: memorize, and comfortably play) 450 measures of classical music
  • Learn one piece at Henle level 6
  • Listen to each of Beethovens sonatas 16-32, while following along in the score, four times throughout the year
  • Listen to each of Griegs lyric pieces, while following along in the score, twice during the year
  • Figure out how to do chromatic runs, across several octaves, at a meaningful pace.


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Originally Posted by QuasiUnaFantasia

Listen to each of Beethovens sonatas 16-32, while following along in the score, four times throughout the year



I don't know whether you already have these, but I have the "Beethoven The Piano Sonatas" with Daniel Barenboim - from Deutsche Grammophon. My daughter bought the set for me for Christmas just over a year ago. They are fabulous recordings of the entire set of Sonatas.

Originally Posted by QuasiUnaFantasia

Figure out how to do chromatic runs, across several octaves, at a meaningful pace.


Learn the first page of Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata - the last measure specifically, but its worthwhile effort to build up to it nicely.


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Originally Posted by akc42
Originally Posted by QuasiUnaFantasia

Listen to each of Beethovens sonatas 16-32, while following along in the score, four times throughout the year


I don't know whether you already have these, but I have the "Beethoven The Piano Sonatas" with Daniel Barenboim - from Deutsche Grammophon. My daughter bought the set for me for Christmas just over a year ago. They are fabulous recordings of the entire set of Sonatas.


I too am a fan of Barenboims Beethoven renditions, although I only have some of them, and they are from his first recording of the whole set of sonatas. I have been thinking about getting a full set of either the first or the second recordings (but not the third, which is live). I do have Kempff's stereo recordings, and the Jando version.

Originally Posted by akc42

Originally Posted by QuasiUnaFantasia

Figure out how to do chromatic runs, across several octaves, at a meaningful pace.


Learn the first page of Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata - the last measure specifically, but its worthwhile effort to build up to it nicely.


That sonata would be one of the really big scalps for me to take. I never really thought about attacking anything from the first movement any time soon, but maybe it is just the workout I need.

Thanks for the suggestions!


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I have a lot of goals for 2020. I'm fascinated with left hand piano music, and having played through Philipp's school for the left hand am ready for actual pieces, so I want to learn all of Godowsky's Waltz-Poems for the left hand, as an intermediate step towards the Godowsky-Chopin left hand etudes, only a few of which (the ones on op. 10 no 1, no 3, and op 25 no 1) seem in the realm of immediate playability for me now.

My other goals are quite modest. All of my dream pieces are virtuosic, but I'm going to try this year to keep things simple. I'm working on Bach inventions and sinfonias to get better at counterpoint, John Field Nocturnes, and Chopin Mazurkas. My right hand is now lagging behind my left. The goal is to get better at contrapuntal voicing and lyrical embellishments. I've always loved difficult music but I'm trying to shift my practice to refinement and control rather than speed and power--control over tone production and evenness of tone are problem areas, so I'm trying to simplify my approach and then build up to velocity over time rather than to treat the piano like I'm working out. My goals are to memorize the Bach, Field, and Chopin, and go deeper into my books, learning new ones and refining the ones I've memorized. But also to have a day or two a week where I explore repertoire I love, using parts of them as exercises. I want to lay the groundwork that will have me ready for Chopin Nocturnes next year, WTC, easier etudes, and the more accessible pieces by composers I love.

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Originally Posted by treefrog
Allowed? smile You should start a separate thread on this.

I’d be happy to give my own definition of what constitutes being able to say "I play piano" but I don’t want to derail this thread.

I'm a true beginner, as in the pieces I'm working on come from books with the word "beginner" somewhere on the front. It seems many in this forum are "beginners" in a different sense, and probably should just say that they play the piano.

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