Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
92 registered members (accordeur, anamnesis, anotherscott, ars3niy, Belger1900, 21 invisible), 1,208 guests, and 550 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
Time spent listening? #2913821 11/19/19 01:14 PM
Joined: Nov 2018
Posts: 79
leemeadowcroft Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Nov 2018
Posts: 79
When learning a new piece how much time do you normally spend listening to other performances and do you search out many different performances and interpretations?

Something like the G Minor Ballade I listen to daily, I would love to learn it but it’s beyond me currently. If I was actively learning it I would probably listen multiple times a day and engross myself in it for a good few months.

I am actively learning Chopin Nocturne 9.2 and have started listening to it a lot more. Interested to know how other people approach listening alongside learning.

Piano & Music Gifts & Accessories (570)
Piano accessories and music gift items, digital piano dolly, music theme party goods
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2913823 11/19/19 01:20 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
I think you'll find that most pianists here (and professional concert pianists too) don't listen to other performances when they're working on a piece, until they have it finished. (I certainly don't).

Then they may, just to see if others have interesting ideas that they can steal. (Good pianists borrow; great ones steal wink ).


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2913831 11/19/19 01:27 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 8,375
Tyrone Slothrop Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 8,375
I have a friend who plays all 4 of the Ballades by memory for at least the last 30 years or so. He told me he rarely listens to any piano music because he gets too analytical with it and doesn't enjoy it.


across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: bennevis] #2913846 11/19/19 02:13 PM
Joined: Mar 2018
Posts: 390
Dr. Rogers Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2018
Posts: 390
Originally Posted by bennevis
Then they may, just to see if others have interesting ideas that they can steal. (Good pianists borrow; great ones steal wink ).


This is what I do. I listen to several interpretations to get ideas, and then I put the recordings aside.


Austin Rogers, PhD
Music Teacher in Austin, TX
Baldwin SD-10 Concert Grand "Kuroneko", Baldwin Upright, Yamaha P-255
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2913847 11/19/19 02:14 PM
Joined: Nov 2018
Posts: 79
leemeadowcroft Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Nov 2018
Posts: 79
Interesting opinions. I suppose listening influences creativity and musicality, though I hadn’t thought of it that way.

The other part of my question about learning is how much time one spends away from the piano looking at and studying the sheet music to understand how it fits together, keys and chords, fingerings etc?

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2913848 11/19/19 02:14 PM
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 69
W
wszxbcl Online Content
Full Member
Online Content
Full Member
W
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 69
Agree with bennevis. I don't listen to any recordings. I don't want to be influenced from the start. I'm playing a Schubert piece that I have never heard before. It's a joy to discover it at first reading as each note is new to me and the piece just unfolds as I play it. After I've worked on it to some satisfaction then I'll play it for my teacher. She may have other ideas. Or I might look for a recording just to see how others have played it.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2913849 11/19/19 02:17 PM
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 3,029
WhoDwaldi Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 3,029
I listen to make sure that I'm not doing a Wim Winters tempo. Then I play at a Wim Winters tempo anyway. laugh


WhoDwaldi
Howard (by Kawai) 5' 10"
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2913851 11/19/19 02:19 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,878
dogperson Offline
Silver Subscriber
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
4000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,878
At the beginning of learning a score, I listen to about five performances once each and then never again. I don’t want to copy what anyone has done, so I limit my exposure; I listen at the beginning of learning just to absorb differences.


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
" I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It’s ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2914037 11/20/19 12:56 AM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 779
T
thepianoplayer416 Offline
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
T
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 779
The 2 main things to listen for are the notes & the beat. The rest including sustain phrases, dynamics I'd normally consider as add-on for later. When it comes to an unfamiliar piece, I am usually not confident playing all the correct notes without checking with at least 1 recording for accuracy. If you're in Suzuki music, the first thing a teacher would say is buy Suzuki Books with a CD at the back. You'd be required to listen to each and every one of your pieces while learning.

Some of the time if I hear a piece and liked it, I would look for a piano arrangement later. There are Pop songs like "Bohemian Rhapsody" by Freddie Mercury, "Your Song' by Elton John or "Piano Man" you listened to the recording first and then decide to find the score instead of the other way around. About 2 years ago I listened to the orchestral version of the Waltz #2 by the Soviet composer Dmitri Shostakovich on radio. I found a piano version online later. 3 weeks ago a piano teacher suggested playing the song "Georgia" which I didn't know very much. I knew there was a version by Ray Charles but ended up listening to the one sung by the Canadian Michael Bublé and the counting started to make sense.

There are pieces we've heard as a child such the songs out of the movie "Sound of music" by Rogers & Hammerstein with no expectation of playing the pieces. In my younger days I went to a few Andrew lloyd Webber musicals like "Cats" & "Phantom of the Opera" and listened to recordings of the pieces and eventually started playing them when I got into playing piano as an adult. I'd download 'Memory" from "Cats" over 30 years after hearing the piece.

When you're with a teacher, you get assigned all sorts of unfamiliar pieces. Before the Internet years ago I might go to a public library and try to find the recordings. Back in the days when i was learning the movements of Bach Orchestral Suite #1 - 3 for violin, I listened to at least 1 recording. Now that online performances are easily accessible, it's almost impossible to learn to play "Minuet in G" without listening to at least 1 recording. And then there are pieces you listened to once or twice and liked it so you'd try to find the sheet music.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: bennevis] #2914139 11/20/19 08:27 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,149
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,149
Originally Posted by bennevis
I think you'll find that most pianists here (and professional concert pianists too) don't listen to other performances when they're working on a piece, until they have it finished. (I certainly don't).

Then they may, just to see if others have interesting ideas that they can steal. (Good pianists borrow; great ones steal wink ).
I think most pianists and especially amateurs do listen to performances when they are working for pieces. Not really different from getting advice from a teacher IMO.

Whether this is a good idea is certainly debatable. For beginners or early intermediates I think it's an extremely good idea which is the idea behind the University of Iowa(?) Piano Pedagogy Project.

Professionals or experienced pianists have probably heard a huge number of performances of anything in the standard literature so they have in effect listened to performances of the piece they are studying unless the piece is not commonly performed.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: pianoloverus] #2914179 11/20/19 09:39 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by bennevis
I think you'll find that most pianists here (and professional concert pianists too) don't listen to other performances when they're working on a piece, until they have it finished. (I certainly don't).

Then they may, just to see if others have interesting ideas that they can steal. (Good pianists borrow; great ones steal wink ).
I think most pianists and especially amateurs do listen to performances when they are working for pieces. Not really different from getting advice from a teacher IMO.


A teacher giving advice doesn't play the whole piece for them from beginning to end, nor be available for repeated "playbacks" like a recording.

None of my teachers - once I got beyond intermediate stage - ever played any piece for me. (Before that, the only time my teacher might play the complete piece for me was after I'd finished learning it to her satisfaction, and about to move on to new pastures: then, she'd sometimes play the whole piece just to show me how she would play it. Never ever before - which is the way it should be. I had to show: first that I could sight-read it in front of her; then learn it from the score by myself; then play it for her the following week. *) At most they might play one or two bars, if I couldn't get exactly what they wanted me to do, or the sound they wanted.

I've listened to countless interviews with pianists (of all standards from young aspiring concert pianists to well-known ones) on radio and TV, and often the interviewer asks how they go about learning a new piece, and whether they listened to others. Several said they would listen to others to get new ideas - but only after they'd formed their own interpretation and fully learnt the piece. None ever said they would deliberately listen to other performances when they were still learning the piece - in fact, many said they'd go out of the way to avoid listening to other performers, even after they'd learnt the piece, if they were still performing it......

* P.S. There is a teacher in the Piano Teachers Forum who couldn't understand why a student she'd been teaching for 3 years "suddenly" couldn't read music (which she discovered by accident), sparking off a long thread in which several people scratched their collective heads. Yet the answer was already obvious - she admitted she always played the whole piece from beginning to end for all her students and 'taught the piece' before giving it to the student to start learning it. That student had an excellent visual and auditory memory, and learnt all her pieces simply by observing her, so that she never needed to learn to read music.......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: bennevis] #2914427 11/20/19 10:04 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 59
D
D959 Online Content
Full Member
Online Content
Full Member
D
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 59
Originally Posted by bennevis
I think you'll find that most pianists here (and professional concert pianists too) don't listen to other performances when they're working on a piece, until they have it finished. (I certainly don't).

Then they may, just to see if others have interesting ideas that they can steal. (Good pianists borrow; great ones steal wink ).


This is definitely how I do it. I usually won't listen to any recordings of a piece I'm learning until I'm at least a third of the way done with it, and if I do, I make sure to listen to at least 3 interpretations of it so I don't get one stuck in my head.

Your interpretation should come from the score and what you decide yourself. It's the only way to improve.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2914455 11/21/19 12:32 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,668
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,668
I often select the pieces to learn because I have heard something that sparks my interest and dig out the score. But learning is much more fun building from the scratch (the score) so I don't listen while learning. This is also one reason why I like to study less common pieces/less known composers. Some composers (like Chopin) I have listened too much over the years and it has taken out all the fun of discovering how to play the music.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: bennevis] #2914558 11/21/19 08:35 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,149
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,149
Originally Posted by bennevis
A teacher giving advice doesn't play the whole piece for them from beginning to end, nor be available for repeated "playbacks" like a recording.
The teacher's advice doesn't even have to be a physical demonstration. Any kind of advice is not much different from the advice on a recording or heavily edited score. And if we're talking about the teacher playing the piece, he doesn't have to play it from beginning to end to give his advice about the whole thing. He could play many separate passages.

Originally Posted by bennevis
None of my teachers - once I got beyond intermediate stage - ever played any piece for me.
In master classes or teachers' studios it's common to have a second piano for the teacher to demonstrate on. I've certainly heard master classes where the teacher demonstrated what they want in a particular passage.

Originally Posted by bennevis
I've listened to countless interviews with pianists (of all standards from young aspiring concert pianists to well-known ones) on radio and TV, and often the interviewer asks how they go about learning a new piece, and whether they listened to others. Several said they would listen to others to get new ideas - but only after they'd formed their own interpretation and fully learnt the piece.
Almost all those pianists have already heard many performances of the piece they are studying unless it's not a piece in the standard repertoire. So it's not like they're learning the piece totally from the score and are not being influenced by previously heard performances.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: pianoloverus] #2914566 11/21/19 09:07 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by bennevis
A teacher giving advice doesn't play the whole piece for them from beginning to end, nor be available for repeated "playbacks" like a recording.
The teacher's advice doesn't even have to be a physical demonstration. Any kind of advice is not much different from the advice on a recording or heavily edited score. And if we're talking about the teacher playing the piece, he doesn't have to play it from beginning to end to give his advice about the whole thing. He could play many separate passages.

Originally Posted by bennevis
None of my teachers - once I got beyond intermediate stage - ever played any piece for me.
In master classes or teachers' studios it's common to have a second piano for the teacher to demonstrate on. I've certainly heard master classes where the teacher demonstrated what they want in a particular passage.

That's exactly what I mean when I say that a teacher demonstrating a few measures to a student is a far cry from the student listening to a recording of the whole piece.

And with recordings, you can listen repeatedly again and again......until you absorb everything as well as learn the notes, the rhythm etc - the whole conception, as well as the rubato, dynamics, nuances, articulation. In fact, if you're good enough, you can give a passable imitation of the pianist in your favorite recording. Like artists who copy the Mona Lisa for (un)discerning clients.....

Quote
Originally Posted by bennevis
I've listened to countless interviews with pianists (of all standards from young aspiring concert pianists to well-known ones) on radio and TV, and often the interviewer asks how they go about learning a new piece, and whether they listened to others. Several said they would listen to others to get new ideas - but only after they'd formed their own interpretation and fully learnt the piece.
Almost all those pianists have already heard many performances of the piece they are studying unless it's not a piece in the standard repertoire. So it's not like they're learning the piece totally from the score and are not being influenced by previously heard performances.

With well-known works, of course all students would have heard other performances. But they wouldn't remember the details of those performances unless they were studying them intently for the purpose of learning the pieces themselves. They would likely only recall obvious stuff like mazurka rhythm and accentuation etc especially if the pianist makes a fetish of them.

For example, I remember hearing Rubinstein play the Heroic Polonaise as a kid, and thinking how similar in conception it sounded to Pollini's - whose recording was the only one I'd heard before - in the use of rubato and pedalling.
When I began learning the piece for myself a few years later, those were the only details I remembered of their recordings. By then, I'd heard other performances and recordings, none of which made as much of an impression as Pollini's. But though I still had his recording (on cassette tape), I didn't listen to it while I was learning it, with the result that my playing of it was quite different.....including the rubato and pedalling whistle. Whereas if I'd taken out that tape and listened to it while I was learning the piece, almost certainly his interpretative ideas would have rubbed off on me......



"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: bennevis] #2914586 11/21/19 09:46 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,149
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,149
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by bennevis
A teacher giving advice doesn't play the whole piece for them from beginning to end, nor be available for repeated "playbacks" like a recording.
The teacher's advice doesn't even have to be a physical demonstration. Any kind of advice is not much different from the advice on a recording or heavily edited score. And if we're talking about the teacher playing the piece, he doesn't have to play it from beginning to end to give his advice about the whole thing. He could play many separate passages.

Originally Posted by bennevis
None of my teachers - once I got beyond intermediate stage - ever played any piece for me.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
In master classes or teachers' studios it's common to have a second piano for the teacher to demonstrate on. I've certainly heard master classes where the teacher demonstrated what they want in a particular passage.

That's exactly what I mean when I say that a teacher demonstrating a few measures to a student is a far cry from the student listening to a recording of the whole piece.
In a lesson or several lessons with a student a teacher could certainly play more than "a few measures" to demonstrate how he thinks it should go. But as I said before, just giving verbal thoughts about how the piece should go is not really different from playing the passages for the student or a student listening to passages before or during learning the piece. And giving extensive verbal thoughts about a piece is commonly done in lessons and master classes.

Originally Posted by bennevis
And with recordings, you can listen repeatedly again and again......until you absorb everything as well as learn the notes, the rhythm etc - the whole conception, as well as the rubato, dynamics, nuances, articulation.
Not what I have been talking about although for beginners and early intermediate players multiple listenings is not a bad idea. I'm sure the teachers from the Iowa Piano Pedagogy Project don't advise those using the recordings there to only listen once or twice.



Originally Posted by bennevis
I've listened to countless interviews with pianists (of all standards from young aspiring concert pianists to well-known ones) on radio and TV, and often the interviewer asks how they go about learning a new piece, and whether they listened to others. Several said they would listen to others to get new ideas - but only after they'd formed their own interpretation and fully learnt the piece.
Almost all those pianists have already heard many performances of the piece they are studying unless it's not a piece in the standard repertoire. So it's not like they're learning the piece totally from the score and are not being influenced by previously heard performances.
With well-known works, of course all students would have heard other performances. But they wouldn't remember the details of those performances unless they were studying them intently for the purpose of learning the pieces themselves.
With well known works advanced students would usually have heard many performances. I think advanced students might remember more than you think about those performances, but even if they don't remember details they could certainly be influenced by those performances.

Originally Posted by bennevis
Whereas if I'd taken out that tape and listened to it while I was learning the piece, almost certainly his interpretative ideas would have rubbed off on me......
I'd expect/hope you'd only be influenced if you liked something you heard in the same way you'd be influenced by something your teacher said or demonstrated. If you liked something you heard, I don't thing being influenced by that kind of idea from a great pianist is a bad thing.

Last edited by pianoloverus; 11/21/19 09:51 AM.
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2914639 11/21/19 11:58 AM
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,763
johnstaf Online Crying
2000 Post Club Member
Online Crying
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,763
I only learn pieces that I already know very well as a listener. There are so many pieces that I love and want to learn, so there's a big backlog. I find listening to a recording of a piece I'm learning can be fascinating. I especially like to look at YouTube videos.

When it comes to playing, I explore the piece to see how I want to play it. I can't unhear all the recordings of well-loved pieces. I'd imagine the recordings/performances that made me fall in love with a piece have much more of an influence than those I come across when learning it.

I feel like the music suggests how it wants to be played, and it's always quite different from the way I've heard anyone else play it.

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2914641 11/21/19 12:10 PM
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,063
8ude Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,063
Maybe I'm in the minority here, but I personally have no problem listening to pieces that I'm learning. I think the notion that listening to a piece forces you into that interpretation is ridiculous. I listen to a bunch of different recordings, and each one might have different ideas that I might take under consideration. But at the end of the day, I am not just a parrot that imitates other recordings - I still always come back to the score as the basis, and make my own decisions as to how best to form my interpretation.


What you are is an accident of birth. What I am, I am through my own efforts. There have been a thousand princes and there will be a thousand more. There is one Beethoven.
Re: Time spent listening? [Re: leemeadowcroft] #2916718 11/26/19 05:08 PM
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,763
johnstaf Online Crying
2000 Post Club Member
Online Crying
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,763
About Daniil Trifonov:

"It was in Moscow that he began to study with Tatiana Zelikman; they would end lessons by listening to a recording of whatever he was working on at the time, performed by a great pianist like Vladimir Horowitz. Then she would have Mr. Trifonov play the piece again. “That would open up a lot of new ways of looking,” he recalled."

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/arts/music/daniil-trifonov-new-york-philharmonic.html

Re: Time spent listening? [Re: johnstaf] #2916728 11/26/19 05:36 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,581
Originally Posted by johnstaf
About Daniil Trifonov:

"It was in Moscow that he began to study with Tatiana Zelikman; they would end lessons by listening to a recording of whatever he was working on at the time, performed by a great pianist like Vladimir Horowitz. Then she would have Mr. Trifonov play the piece again. “That would open up a lot of new ways of looking,” he recalled."

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/arts/music/daniil-trifonov-new-york-philharmonic.html

He had already learnt the piece, which is what most of us here would also do: listen to great pianists to get new ideas after we'd learnt the piece.

He didn't learn the piece by listening to Horowitz.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
Christmas Ornaments Music Theme
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Removing action from Bechstein V, early 1900's
by jkess114 - 12/08/19 03:17 PM
'Re-Shaping hammers and shanks'?
by LS35A - 12/08/19 12:28 PM
Inevitable progress
by Animisha - 12/08/19 11:50 AM
Like Forscore but for Mac suggestions please
by dhts - 12/08/19 09:38 AM
What's Hot!!
Our August Newsletter is Out!
------------------
Mason & Hamlin Piano Factory Tour!

-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics195,572
Posts2,899,809
Members95,180
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3