Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

Who's Online Now
80 registered members (accordeur, anotherscott, Akaitsuki, Anglagard44, Ankee, 36251, alexk3954, Calavera, 20 invisible), 3,467 guests, and 464 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
How do you think about your left hand/right hand #2912188 11/15/19 02:00 AM
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 9
K
Koombot Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
K
Joined: Nov 2019
Posts: 9
How do you professionals, or more advanced people think about what your left hand does relative to your right hand?

Its a hard thing to kind of explain but there have been certain songs I've played where the left and right hand kind of fell like they're in a dance, the left hand might be 'tapping' out the rhythm but its very much part of something bigger so that if I stopped my right hand I doubt I could continue the rhythm even if it's even.

Is this how it should be? I've not really got a problem coordinating this sort of thing but the way I've seen some people talk, especially when doing covers it is as if the left hand is a separate entity from the right and they are each doing their own things.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912200 11/15/19 03:00 AM
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,965
T
Ted Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
T
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 1,965
The older I get the more I tend to regard my playing mechanism as one big hand with ten fingers, at least mentally. Any finger is liable to do duty anywhere within the idea flow. I am only talking about improvisation of course, not playing pieces. The hands can be either coordinated or asynchronous, both are valid musical options it seems to me, depending on the nature of the musical idea.


"We shall always love the music of the masters, but they are all dead and now it's our turn." - Llewelyn Jones, my piano teacher
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912201 11/15/19 03:07 AM
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,017
johnstaf Online Crying
3000 Post Club Member
Online Crying
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,017
I think of them in parallel most of the time. It's like two simultaneous streams. Most of the time they have to have independence so that's usually good. Sometimes I think of the rhythm between hands though...

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912279 11/15/19 06:27 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,760
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,760
They are part of the same entity, except when they're not.

Which is to say, they're together when they need to be, and separate when they need to be. I have small hands, so I sometimes redistribute notes between them, on the fly if I'm sight-reading. It doesn't matter whether the notes are clustered together in one clef - I just want to be able to play the notes with what I've got. That's when both are part of the whole, and my hands (and fingers) automatically do what they need to do, without me having to consciously think about it.

On the other hand (pun intended), there are times when I want to dissociate them from each other, coming together only when they need to, as when one hand is clearly playing the accompaniment and the other the melody, and maybe there's another counter-melody running between them, so each has to be distinct from the other, especially if there's a polyrhythm involved.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912337 11/15/19 10:09 AM
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,178
Serge88 Offline
Silver Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,178
If I think about my left hand, I forget about my right hand and mistake happen. How do I play with my hands together ? I slowly practise, practise and practise until my hands can play by themselves.



"The piano keys are black and white but they sound like a million colors in your mind.”
– Maria Cristina

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912343 11/15/19 10:16 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 9,030
Tyrone Slothrop Online Content
9000 Post Club Member
Online Content
9000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 9,030
I think there is also a difference in the flavor of piano one is learning. Most of the commenters so far are learning or play classical piano where the hands are more balanced and so each hand has a life of its own. With the chord piano which is taught by Alfred's, Duane Shinn, etc., each hand has its own different job. the RH's job for example is melody and the LH's job is to accompany the RH.

I think how a pianist views their two hands depends also on the type of piano playing they are doing.


[Linked Image]
across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912661 11/16/19 04:43 AM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
I think about hands separately, I synchronize them only when I want to synchronize them. If I memorize piece well stopping one hand will not cause the other to stop.

In fact I has had occasions when I forgot notes of one hand or the other when playing, continuing to play with the other hand is the only way to avoid embarrasing break in such cases. You need to learn to do it.

Last edited by Iaroslav Vasiliev; 11/16/19 04:52 AM.
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2912713 11/16/19 09:11 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
I think about hands separately, I synchronize them only when I want to synchronize them. If I memorize piece well stopping one hand will not cause the other to stop.

In fact I has had occasions when I forgot notes of one hand or the other when playing, continuing to play with the other hand is the only way to avoid embarrasing break in such cases. You need to learn to do it.
As far as I know most pianists at all levels don't adopt that approach when they have a memory slip. They either go to a nearby memorized spot or try to improvise something with both hands. Although many pianists do at least a little practicing of hands separately on the most difficult passages, I don't think many bother to memorize the entire piece hands separately except possibly for highly contrapuntal music like Bach.

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912728 11/16/19 09:54 AM
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,879
Z
zrtf90 Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Z
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,879
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
As far as I know...
Without supporting data that may not be very far and therefore tells us nothing.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
...most pianists at all levels don't adopt that approach...
That is, from the complete novice to the upper echelon's of concert pianists and again tells us nothing.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
...when they have a memory slip. They either go to a nearby memorized spot or try to improvise something with both hands...
If the many includes much of the dross it may not be worth copying them. What do the better pianists do?
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Although many pianists do at least a little practicing of hands separately on the most difficult passages, I don't think many bother to memorize the entire piece hands separately except possibly for highly contrapuntal music like Bach.
The many pianists may be good or they may be dross. Unless we know the calibre of these many pianists they're not role models worth copying.

What are you trying to tell us? That we shouldn't memorise hands separately because a lot of the dross don't and that we should aim to be like the dross?

The better regarded pedagogues recommend that repertoire be memorised hands separately as well as hands together because knowing each hand separately bypasses procedural memory and reinforces deliberate memory. The better concert pianists do this for at least the potential trouble spots.

If you're going to have music in your repertoire it's better to memorise it well and that includes memorising it hands separately. That's what the better pedagogues recommend and what the better concert pianists do.

Let's aim for the stars, not the gutter.


Richard
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: zrtf90] #2912744 11/16/19 10:52 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
Originally Posted by zrtf90
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
As far as I know...
Without supporting data that may not be very far and therefore tells us nothing.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
...most pianists at all levels don't adopt that approach...
That is, from the complete novice to the upper echelon's of concert pianists and again tells us nothing.
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
...when they have a memory slip. They either go to a nearby memorized spot or try to improvise something with both hands...
If the many includes much of the dross it may not be worth copying them. What do the better pianists do?
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Although many pianists do at least a little practicing of hands separately on the most difficult passages, I don't think many bother to memorize the entire piece hands separately except possibly for highly contrapuntal music like Bach.
The many pianists may be good or they may be dross. Unless we know the calibre of these many pianists they're not role models worth copying.

What are you trying to tell us? That we shouldn't memorise hands separately because a lot of the dross don't and that we should aim to be like the dross?

The better regarded pedagogues recommend that repertoire be memorised hands separately as well as hands together because knowing each hand separately bypasses procedural memory and reinforces deliberate memory. The better concert pianists do this for at least the potential trouble spots.

If you're going to have music in your repertoire it's better to memorise it well and that includes memorising it hands separately. That's what the better pedagogues recommend and what the better concert pianists do.

Let's aim for the stars, not the gutter.

None of my posts refer to just amateurs or "dross" pianists as you call them.

My post refers to all levels of pianists. If you think most of the greatest pianists or excellent amateurs memorize their pieces hands separately you are mistaken. They might do this for "potential trouble spots" or Bach fugues but that's far different from the entire piece or every piece. In the articles about memorization and PW posts about it, hands separate rarely comes up.

You said many times that I was referring to poor pianists and that was not at all the case. I have heard hundreds of professional concerts, and the pianists occasionally have had memory slips. None of them then started playing just with one hand as you suggested.

Any kind of extra practice(including hands separately) will help with memorization but hands separate memorization is not something that most pianists of all levels do which is why it rarely comes up in discussion
about memorization.

Last edited by pianoloverus; 11/16/19 11:01 AM.
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912794 11/16/19 01:00 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 23,363
BruceD Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 23,363
Originally Posted by Koombot
How do you professionals, or more advanced people think about what your left hand does relative to your right hand?
[...]


I am not sure I really understand the import of the question. In the literature I play, mostly classical but some Broadway and standards, I never "think about" what my hands are doing. They work as the score tells them to work, or as my improvising guides me. In other words, I don't think about the hands separately, but rather what the intended overall sound is that I want to produce.

A difficult passage in one hand or the other may have me concentrate on that passage and hand momentarily, but generally, no, I don't think about the hands separately. That said, I am not sure what is meant by the question.

Regards,


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912804 11/16/19 01:42 PM
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,879
Z
zrtf90 Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Z
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,879
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
None of my posts refer to just amateurs or "dross" pianists as you call them.
My post refers to all levels of pianists.
None of your posts discounted dross pianists, you just said most or many without the qualification of fine pianists and that must include dross pianists - and I never once referred to amateurs as dross - though I don't discount the fact that some of them may be.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
You said many times that I was referring to poor pianists...
No, no, no. I said that you included all pianists without qualification and that must, perforce, include inferior pianists.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
None of them then started playing just with one hand as you suggested.
No, you're reading into it again. I never suggested that they continued with one hand. Memorising hands separately increases deliberate memory and therefore reduces memory lapses. It doesn't mean that when memory lapses occur the player can continue on with one hand. A memory lapse tends to happen for both hands.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
In the articles about memorization and PW posts about it, hands separate rarely comes up....
Any kind of extra practice(including hands separately) will help with memorization but hands separate memorization is not something that most pianists of all levels do which is why it rarely comes up in discussion
about memorization.
It comes up frequently in teaching memorisation. Josh Wright, Robert Estrin, Graham Fitch, Ilinca Vartic...all recommend memorising hands separately as well as hands together. Most books and sites discussing memorisiation include memorising hands separately. It's a common strategem.


Richard
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: zrtf90] #2912814 11/16/19 02:32 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
Originally Posted by zrtf90
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
None of my posts refer to just amateurs or "dross" pianists as you call them.
My post refers to all levels of pianists.
None of your posts discounted dross pianists, you just said most or many without the qualification of fine pianists and that must include dross pianists - and I never once referred to amateurs as dross - though I don't discount the fact that some of them may be.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
You said many times that I was referring to poor pianists...
No, no, no. I said that you included all pianists without qualification and that must, perforce, include inferior pianists.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
None of them then started playing just with one hand as you suggested.
No, you're reading into it again. I never suggested that they continued with one hand. Memorising hands separately increases deliberate memory and therefore reduces memory lapses. It doesn't mean that when memory lapses occur the player can continue on with one hand. A memory lapse tends to happen for both hands.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
In the articles about memorization and PW posts about it, hands separate rarely comes up....
Any kind of extra practice(including hands separately) will help with memorization but hands separate memorization is not something that most pianists of all levels do which is why it rarely comes up in discussion
about memorization.
It comes up frequently in teaching memorisation. Josh Wright, Robert Estrin, Graham Fitch, Ilinca Vartic...all recommend memorising hands separately as well as hands together. Most books and sites discussing memorisiation include memorising hands separately. It's a common strategem.



Originally Posted by zrtf90
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
None of my posts refer to just amateurs or "dross" pianists as you call them.

My post refers to all levels of pianists.
None of your posts discounted dross pianists, you just said most or many without the qualification of fine pianists and that must include dross pianists - and I never once referred to amateurs as dross - though I don't discount the fact that some of them may be.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
You said many times that I was referring to poor pianists...
No, no, no. I said that you included all pianists without qualification and that must, perforce, include inferior pianists.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
None of them then started playing just with one hand as you suggested.
No, you're reading into it again. I never suggested that they continued with one hand. Memorising hands separately increases deliberate memory and therefore reduces memory lapses. It doesn't mean that when memory lapses occur the player can continue on with one hand. A memory lapse tends to happen for both hands.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
In the articles about memorization and PW posts about it, hands separate rarely comes up....
Any kind of extra practice(including hands separately) will help with memorization but hands separate memorization is not something that most pianists of all levels do which is why it rarely comes up in discussion
about memorization.
It comes up frequently in teaching memorisation. Josh Wright, Robert Estrin, Graham Fitch, Ilinca Vartic...all recommend memorising hands separately as well as hands together. Most books and sites discussing memorisiation include memorising hands separately. It's a common strategem.
1. One can find teachers recommending anything if one looks hard enough. Do the teachers you listed recommend always memorizing hand separately for the entire piece ? That's what you say is necessary. Please give links to the videos where they say this. My guess is they say it's one possible tool to help memorization.
2. I made it 100% clear in my last post I was referring to good pianists and not dross as you call them. I meant that as a clarification of the post before that so there is nothing to debate about what I'm talking about.
3. I have read many articles on memorization and cannot recall a single one that mentions memorizing hands separately. I find the idea that an advanced pianist would routinely do this for every piece in its entirety quite ridiculous. I read a book where the author interviewed a large number of top pianists and asked all them mostly the same questions. One of the questions was "How do you memorize?" I don't think a single pianist said they memorize hands separately.

Last edited by pianoloverus; 11/16/19 02:33 PM.
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912825 11/16/19 03:16 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,551
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,551
I have no opinion about memorizing, whether HS or HT. The latest direction of the discussion seems OT, and what advanced pianists do in performances won't help a beginner sorting out his hands at a basic level anyway. Instead, this is simply an anecdote brought forth by the idea of what one might do when the thread is lost in a performance.

This is what happened to me well over a decade ago. I had not touched a piano for 35 years. I'd been self-taught as a child. I was in my 4th year of violin lessons, and in the middle of redefining practice, goals, everything. I finally knew enough to initiate that conversation. I got a DP at the same time, knew that my childhood self-teaching would have made a mess, and asked for some piano lessons to get me going. I had an Agay "easy classics" and we used two pieces from that - one had variations incl. a (for me) fast part. TThree weeks in my teacher thought it great for me to perform both pieces in the recitals, 3 weeks away. So 7 weeks after getting a piano after a 35 year break I was doing two pieces in a recital.

In my practising, I applied the new ideas of practice & learning goals. I made sure that the different parts were solid in different ways, I practised in "recital mode" meaning playing through without stopping, practised weak spots that came up, and practised starting at random places. "Memorizing" was not on my mind. I brought the music with me as an aid, and played while glancing at the score.

In the recital, when I got to the "fast" part, a bratty kid that kept making noises, startled me, and I lost my place. My LH could keep going because it had a predictable pattern, so I kept going with it ....... because I could keep going. I got to a place two lines later where the RH came in with the next phrase, and I simply brought in the RH and kept going. This is what Iaroslav mentioned. I had no idea of what one "ought to do" - this is what I did. I did have ingrained from violin recitals that you do not stop. You don't stop and start again unless something really drastic happens. You try to keep going - so I did.

For a person to improvise his way back in during a lapse: You need to have a fair command of music and technical skill to do that. You can't expect a beginner or early intermediate to improvise - and many a classical pianist will never have learned to do so. In this forum that is just unrealistic. This is the ABF.

The whole thing is OFF TOPIC because we're not discussing how to pull off a successful performance. We're also not discussing memorizing. My anecdote is also off topic.

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: BruceD] #2912834 11/16/19 03:28 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,551
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,551
Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Koombot
How do you professionals, or more advanced people think about what your left hand does relative to your right hand?
[...]


I am not sure I really understand the import of the question. In the literature I play, mostly classical but some Broadway and standards, I never "think about" what my hands are doing.

I don't think about how to hold a pencil, or if I should put the other hand on the paper to hold it steady. I concentrate on what I am planning to write or draw. That is because my first fat crayon probably got put into my hands when I was a toddler; reading and writing are taught when you are 6 or 7 at the latest. For anyone who started to play in instrument as a child, all this is second nature. You're doing all kinds of adjustments, using what formed, without thinking about it.

I have some things and I don't have others. I taught myself to play, on a little child size organ when I was 8, and then a piano, still totally on my own. I heard the voices of polyphonic style music like two voices; each of my hands was one of those voices, like puppeteers playing characters, maybe, and that's how it came to me. But the physical motions I acquired were primitive and sometimes wrong, and the repertoire tended to be one-side in style. So I've had to relearn.

I've learned different things from different teachers. You may have one hand leaping in large movements, while the other is moving more quietly and fingery. You might have a hand move ahead of time to arrive, and you can time what is happening in the other hand to see the best timing of that - choreography. You might have two hands playing the same melody parallel, but now the hands do mirror image things. Some of the teachers actually teach planning this, and considering how what one hand does might affect the other hand. I've seen two sides to this:
a) It can be helpful.
b) It can have the effect of the centipede scurrying along, being asked which leg it moves first, and then getting too confused to move anymore.

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2912839 11/16/19 03:41 PM
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 115
W
wszxbcl Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
W
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 115
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev

In fact I has had occasions when I forgot notes of one hand or the other when playing, continuing to play with the other hand is the only way to avoid embarrasing break in such cases. You need to learn to do it.


Agree. I do the same. But you know it's not arbitrary which hand continues playing. If you are keeping a rhythmic pattern of chords on the left hand, it's not good to break the pattern when you perform, but you can keep the repetition going, then right hand re-join. For example I migh repeat an alberti bass instead of completely stop, then right hand comes back in with the melody.

If you forget notes, it's more likely the middle harmony notes. Most people remember the melody, even tunes heard years ago. If you know the melody you can keep the piece going. That's easy for people with perfect pitch, but also if you've had ear training you can play dictations. I only have relative pitch but that's enough to play through.

I think when you keep going with one hand, it's not because you memorized hands separately, it's because you memorized music. Memorizing hands, whether separately or together, is just muscle memory without musical intent. If you play in an ensemble, your partner(s) will just keep going when you stumble and you rely on your ear to rejoin at the right spot. It's musicianship. Muscle memory will not help you do that.

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Koombot] #2913081 11/17/19 09:52 AM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
Originally Posted by wszxbcl
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev

In fact I has had occasions when I forgot notes of one hand or the other when playing, continuing to play with the other hand is the only way to avoid embarrasing break in such cases. You need to learn to do it.


Agree. I do the same. But you know it's not arbitrary which hand continues playing. If you are keeping a rhythmic pattern of chords on the left hand, it's not good to break the pattern when you perform, but you can keep the repetition going, then right hand re-join. For example I migh repeat an alberti bass instead of completely stop, then right hand comes back in with the melody.

If you forget notes, it's more likely the middle harmony notes. Most people remember the melody, even tunes heard years ago. If you know the melody you can keep the piece going. That's easy for people with perfect pitch, but also if you've had ear training you can play dictations. I only have relative pitch but that's enough to play through.

I think when you keep going with one hand, it's not because you memorized hands separately, it's because you memorized music. Memorizing hands, whether separately or together, is just muscle memory without musical intent. If you play in an ensemble, your partner(s) will just keep going when you stumble and you rely on your ear to rejoin at the right spot. It's musicianship. Muscle memory will not help you do that.

Agree. I never contemplated on how it goes, I think your explanation is right.

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: pianoloverus] #2913084 11/17/19 10:03 AM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
In fact I has had occasions when I forgot notes of one hand or the other when playing, continuing to play with the other hand is the only way to avoid embarrasing break in such cases. You need to learn to do it.

As far as I know most pianists at all levels don't adopt that approach when they have a memory slip. They either go to a nearby memorized spot or try to improvise something with both hands.

I'd say the goal is not to break rhythm. Passing notes in one hand I'd call the best approach, improvising (or, probably, let's call it 'free playing' in the rhythm in the key smile ) is the second best, a jump is the worst, it's a last resort.

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
I don't think many bother to memorize the entire piece hands separately except possibly for highly contrapuntal music like Bach.

I don't think anyone does HS memorization. I don't.

Last edited by Iaroslav Vasiliev; 11/17/19 10:10 AM.
Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2913109 11/17/19 11:27 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,535
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
I'd say the goal is not to break rhythm. Passing notes in one hand I'd call the best approach, improvising (or, probably, let's call it 'free playing' in the rhythm in the key smile ) is the second best, a jump is the worst, it's a last resort.
I've heard hundreds of professional solo piano recitals. When these pianists have had a memory slip, they never just continued playing with one hand as you seem to suggest. Whether they improvise of skip to a part they can recall they always do it with both hands.

Re: How do you think about your left hand/right hand [Re: pianoloverus] #2913348 11/18/19 02:01 AM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
Online Content
1000 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,381
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
I'd say the goal is not to break rhythm. Passing notes in one hand I'd call the best approach, improvising (or, probably, let's call it 'free playing' in the rhythm in the key smile ) is the second best, a jump is the worst, it's a last resort.
I've heard hundreds of professional solo piano recitals. When these pianists have had a memory slip, they never just continued playing with one hand as you seem to suggest. Whether they improvise of skip to a part they can recall they always do it with both hands.

You mean in hundreds of recitals you never noticed passed notes? It's hard to believe.

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Yamaha Clavinova CLP-230 versus Arius YDP-103
by sheets - 01/26/20 11:51 AM
Ravel Left Hand Concerto
by JSPiano - 01/26/20 10:27 AM
Any idea what piano Alma is playing here?
by Fots - 01/26/20 06:15 AM
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics196,518
Posts2,917,321
Members95,735
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3