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Joined: Mar 2010
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Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by mivaldes
I bought the telecaster for a bit less than $800

Cool. The Tele is a quintessential model, IMO. I had a '63 Esquire many moons ago, which shared the body and neck shapes with the Tele, so it looked very similar.


The Esquire was originally produced from '51 to 69. In '51 an "uspcale" two pick up model was introduced and called the Broadcaster. Gretsch Drum's lawyers soon reminded Leo and Don Randall (first head of marketing at Fender) that they already had a musical instrument called a Broadcaster so Fender and Randall renamed the Broadcaster Telecaster. There was a transitional model made in 51 with no model designation now called the Nocaster. There are two original "No-casters" listed right now. One is listed at $56,000 and the other $114,000

Kurt


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Originally Posted by KurtZ
Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by mivaldes
I bought the telecaster for a bit less than $800

Cool. The Tele is a quintessential model, IMO. I had a '63 Esquire many moons ago, which shared the body and neck shapes with the Tele, so it looked very similar.


The Esquire was originally produced from '51 to 69. In '51 an "uspcale" two pick up model was introduced and called the Broadcaster. Gretsch Drum's lawyers soon reminded Leo and Don Randall (first head of marketing at Fender) that they already had a musical instrument called a Broadcaster so Fender and Randall renamed the Broadcaster Telecaster. There was a transitional model made in 51 with no model designation now called the Nocaster. There are two original "No-casters" listed right now. One is listed at $56,000 and the other $114,000

Kurt




I asked my luthier why old electric guitars were getting bid up to absurd levels and he said, guys are trying to regain their youth. I can’t help but agree with him. My luthier is the last luthier building classical guitars full time at the bench in New York City, a place that, at one time, had many luthiers, including Manuel Velazquez, Manouk Papazian, Del Pilar, and Thomas Humphrey.

It’s hard for me to appreciate the workmanship in solid body electrics and see how they could be worth that much money when comparing them to classical guitars. There are so many solid body electrics available at cheap prices and CNC machines can spit them out, but whatever.

Last edited by LarryK; 10/24/19 08:22 AM.
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The first time I ever visited Paris, I was in Montmartre when an artist tried to cajole me into a chair so that he could paint my portrait.

I had no interest in having my portrait painted, so I hardly skipped a beat, and wouldn't have, except that he then made an insulting comment about a couple of water colors that I had just purchased from someone else. I turned back and he launched into a well-worn screed about how he was a "true artist" and the other guy manufactured crap for tourists.

When he wound down I said, "mais il peut nourrir sa famille ce soir." This sent him into a tizzy, and the other nearby artists manufacturers started laughing and goading him, including one caricaturist who was waving a "portrait" of a guy holding a brush and palette, but whose oversized face was bright red with steam coming out of the ears! It obviously was meant to be my artiste, whom I'm sure held the caricaturist and everyone around him in contempt.

The reality in modern times is that almost no one wants their portrait done in oil, let alone wasting hours sitting for a starving artist in Paris when anyone who did want one could waste less precious time sitting for a starving artist back home. This guy was the only one who didn't get it: that his life would probably improve immensely--at least in terms of blood pressure and finances--if he would just swallow his pride and start selling paintings of the Eiffel Tower and Sacre Coeur. Visitors want souvenirs of the city, even if they prefer original paintings to the ubiquitous prints.

All these years later, my collection includes these two original watercolors, compete with backstory about how I purchased them from the artist in Montmartre. My collection does not included a portrait in oil--of me or anyone else--but it does include this extra story about the guy who couldn't appreciate the value in what he considered insignificant, yet was obviously frustrated by his own irrelevance.


“If it sounds good, it IS good.”
― Duke Ellington
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Originally Posted by Retsacnal
The first time I ever visited Paris, I was in Montmartre when an artist tried to cajole me into a chair so that he could paint my portrait.

I had no interest in having my portrait painted, so I hardly skipped a beat, and wouldn't have, except that he then made an insulting comment about a couple of water colors that I had just purchased from someone else. I turned back and he launched into a well-worn screed about how he was a "true artist" and the other guy manufactured crap for tourists.

When he wound down I said, "mais il peut nourrir sa famille ce soir." This sent him into a tizzy, and the other nearby artists manufacturers started laughing and goading him, including one caricaturist who was waving a "portrait" of a guy holding a brush and palette, but whose oversized face was bright red with steam coming out of the ears! It obviously was meant to be my artiste, whom I'm sure held the caricaturist and everyone around him in contempt.

The reality in modern times is that almost no one wants their portrait done in oil, let alone wasting hours sitting for a starving artist in Paris when anyone who did want one could waste less precious time sitting for a starving artist back home. This guy was the only one who didn't get it: that his life would probably improve immensely--at least in terms of blood pressure and finances--if he would just swallow his pride and start selling paintings of the Eiffel Tower and Sacre Coeur. Visitors want souvenirs of the city, even if they prefer original paintings to the ubiquitous prints.

All these years later, my collection includes these two original watercolors, compete with backstory about how I purchased them from the artist in Montmartre. My collection does not included a portrait in oil--of me or anyone else--but it does include this extra story about the guy who couldn't appreciate the value in what he considered insignificant, yet was obviously frustrated by his own irrelevance.


I don't quite understand how your story relates to people selling used electric guitars for $56k and $114k. Could you explain how they're connected? Do you mean that my talented luthier friend should start turning out electric guitars when there are literally thousands of electric guitars available and they're relatively easy to make? A lot of fine hand work goes into making a classical guitar even if there is not a lot of money to be made when selling them.

Here is a short documentary on Manuel Velazquez, a New York City luthier who devoted his life to the craft of building fine classical guitars.



Was your annoying artist a short Spanish guy with a head like a bull?

Perhaps you passed up the chance to me this artist's muse, like Sylvette.

If I had been in the right part of Central Park one day, I could have bought some drawings from Banksy for about $40 and have turned them for over a $100k at auction. I was in the wrong part of the park. So it goes.


Last edited by LarryK; 10/24/19 02:29 PM.
Joined: Oct 2007
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Originally Posted by LarryK
Originally Posted by Retsacnal
The first time I ever visited Paris, I was in Montmartre when an artist tried to cajole me into a chair so that he could paint my portrait.

I had no interest in having my portrait painted, so I hardly skipped a beat, and wouldn't have, except that he then made an insulting comment about a couple of water colors that I had just purchased from someone else. I turned back and he launched into a well-worn screed about how he was a "true artist" and the other guy manufactured crap for tourists.

When he wound down I said, "mais il peut nourrir sa famille ce soir." This sent him into a tizzy, and the other nearby artists manufacturers started laughing and goading him, including one caricaturist who was waving a "portrait" of a guy holding a brush and palette, but whose oversized face was bright red with steam coming out of the ears! It obviously was meant to be my artiste, whom I'm sure held the caricaturist and everyone around him in contempt.

The reality in modern times is that almost no one wants their portrait done in oil, let alone wasting hours sitting for a starving artist in Paris when anyone who did want one could waste less precious time sitting for a starving artist back home. This guy was the only one who didn't get it: that his life would probably improve immensely--at least in terms of blood pressure and finances--if he would just swallow his pride and start selling paintings of the Eiffel Tower and Sacre Coeur. Visitors want souvenirs of the city, even if they prefer original paintings to the ubiquitous prints.

All these years later, my collection includes these two original watercolors, compete with backstory about how I purchased them from the artist in Montmartre. My collection does not included a portrait in oil--of me or anyone else--but it does include this extra story about the guy who couldn't appreciate the value in what he considered insignificant, yet was obviously frustrated by his own irrelevance.


I don't quite understand how your story relates to people selling used electric guitars for $56k and $114k. Could you explain how they're connected? Do you mean that my talented luthier friend should start turning out electric guitars when there are literally thousands of electric guitars available and they're relatively easy to make? A lot of fine hand work goes into making a classical guitar even if there is not a lot of money to be made when selling them.

Here is a short documentary on Manuel Velazquez, a New York City luthier who devoted his life to the craft of building fine classical guitars.



Was your annoying artist a short Spanish guy with a head like a bull?

Perhaps you passed up the chance to me this artist's muse, like Sylvette.

If I had been in the right part of Central Park one day, I could have bought some drawings from Banksy for about $40 and have turned them for over a $100k at auction. I was in the wrong part of the park. So it goes.


Saw that movie. Didn't realize she was that gorgeous in real life!


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Preludio: Bach/Rachmaninoff E Major Sonata for Violin
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