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Help with repertoire
#2878421 08/10/19 10:31 PM
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Hey everybody, i have just entered in a musical college, but right now i'm without a teach for a while (hope just this month). So i would aprecciate some help with my next repertoire. Good pieces to practice and help develop my technique.

My lastest repertoire is:

- Haydn: Piano Sonata in e minor, No.53, Hob.XVI/34 (1st movement)
- Bach: Prelude and Fugue No.2 (WTC I)
- Bach: Sinfonia No. 6 in E major BWV 792 (Finishing it)
- Bach: Gigue from Partita No.1
- Debussy: Le Petite Negre
- Scott Joplin: Peacherine rag

Old repertoire:

- Debussy: Clair de lune
- Bach: Little preludes BWV 936, BWV 937
- Bach: Invention No.8 F major
- Tchaikovsky - The Seasons, Op. 37a : October

I had played other pieces that i just can't remember. I can't play my lastest repertoire at the full speed like some pros does, but in a acceptable tempo. I would like some recommendations of repertoire that i can continue learning, anything is acceptable for me, i also like challenges.

I love these following pieces, are them approchable for me?

- Tchaikovsky - The Seasons, Op. 37a : August
- Scarlatti Sonata in F minor K.466
- Debussy: Ballade, L, 70
- Schubert: Impromptu, D899,Op.90: II Alegro


Last edited by alu1; 08/10/19 10:35 PM.
Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878476 08/11/19 08:00 AM
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Those pieces seem reasonable to me although all but the Scarlatti may be technically challenging based on your current repertoire. I'm assuming that you can play your current rep reasonably close to speed if not "at full speed like some pros".

I think the Debussy Ballade is the hardest and the Scarlatti is the easiest although they all have their own technical difficulties.


Last edited by pianoloverus; 08/11/19 08:08 AM.
Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878554 08/11/19 01:19 PM
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I am most interested right now in August by Tchaikosvky. Are there any other pieces suggestions you could give me?

Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878557 08/11/19 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by alu1
I am most interested right now in August by Tchaikosvky. Are there any other pieces suggestions you could give me?
There are thousands of possibilities. If you name a composer that would help people give suggestions.

Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878563 08/11/19 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by alu1
I am most interested right now in August by Tchaikosvky. Are there any other pieces suggestions you could give me?


I can think of 11 right off the bat.


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Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878565 08/11/19 01:54 PM
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Well, I really love Chopin, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Mozart, Liszt, Debussy, Saint-Saëns. These are the composers I like to hear a lot. There are others, but these are my selection, even for when I am more advanced.

Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878589 08/11/19 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by alu1
Well, I really love Chopin, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Mozart, Liszt, Debussy, Saint-Saëns. These are the composers I like to hear a lot. There are others, but these are my selection, even for when I am more advanced.


Start on a Chopin etude or two. Black Keys and Revolutionary aren't so hard, especially if you take the tempo down a notch or two.

As for Liszt, pieces like Un Sospiro and Liebestraum should be within your reach. Also, some Rachmaninov preludes are easier than they sound when you get to know them.

Mozart Sonatas are a must, Sonata K330 is a personal favorite of mine.


Schumann is the mann.
Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878590 08/11/19 03:25 PM
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There are probably at least 50 Chopin pieces which are better to start with than any of the etudes, and even Chopin would have said so. You would be better off to start with the Mazurkas, Nocturnes, or Waltzes.


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Re: Help with repertoire
achoo42 #2878600 08/11/19 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by achoo42
Originally Posted by alu1
Well, I really love Chopin, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Mozart, Liszt, Debussy, Saint-Saëns. These are the composers I like to hear a lot. There are others, but these are my selection, even for when I am more advanced.


Start on a Chopin etude or two. Black Keys and Revolutionary aren't so hard, especially if you take the tempo down a notch or two.

As for Liszt, pieces like Un Sospiro and Liebestraum should be within your reach. Also, some Rachmaninov preludes are easier than they sound when you get to know them.

Mozart Sonatas are a must, Sonata K330 is a personal favorite of mine.
I think almost all the above are considerably beyond an appropriate level based on the OP's latest and recent rep and the fact that he said he doesn't play them quite up to speed.

IMO more appropriate Mozart pieces would be something like the Rondo in D major or Fantasy in d minor.

Chopin options would be the Waltz(L'Adieu), Waltz in a minor Op. 34 No. 2, and Preludes in D flat major, e minor, b minor, A flat major.

Ravel: Forlane from Le Tombeau de Couperin or Pavane for a Dead Princess.

Liszt: Consolation in D flat or transcription of Schubert's Litanei.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxA7VjOn35U

Rachmaninov: Prelude in D from Op. 23 or the transcription of Vocalise by Fiorentino.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q30JUz8jn9E

Re: Help with repertoire
pianoloverus #2878614 08/11/19 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by achoo42
Originally Posted by alu1
Well, I really love Chopin, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Mozart, Liszt, Debussy, Saint-Saëns. These are the composers I like to hear a lot. There are others, but these are my selection, even for when I am more advanced.


Start on a Chopin etude or two. Black Keys and Revolutionary aren't so hard, especially if you take the tempo down a notch or two.

As for Liszt, pieces like Un Sospiro and Liebestraum should be within your reach. Also, some Rachmaninov preludes are easier than they sound when you get to know them.

Mozart Sonatas are a must, Sonata K330 is a personal favorite of mine.
I think almost all the above are considerably beyond an appropriate level based on the OP's latest and recent rep and the fact that he said he doesn't play them quite up to speed.

IMO more appropriate Mozart pieces would be something like the Rondo in D major or Fantasy in d minor.

Chopin options would be the Waltz(L'Adieu), Waltz in a minor Op. 34 No. 2, and Preludes in D flat major, e minor, b minor, A flat major.

Ravel: Forlane from Le Tombeau de Couperin or Pavane for a Dead Princess.

Liszt: Consolation in D flat or transcription of Schubert's Litanei.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxA7VjOn35U

Rachmaninov: Prelude in D from Op. 23 or the transcription of Vocalise by Fiorentino.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q30JUz8jn9E



I did miss the part where he said they were below tempo, I (incorrectly) assumed that his list of repertoire was indicative of the level he was finished with.

In that case, I guess my list would be for "the next level", probably after about a year of study.


Schumann is the mann.
Re: Help with repertoire
BDB #2878629 08/11/19 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by achoo42
Originally Posted by alu1
Well, I really love Chopin, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Mozart, Liszt, Debussy, Saint-Saëns. These are the composers I like to hear a lot. There are others, but these are my selection, even for when I am more advanced.


Start on a Chopin etude or two. Black Keys and Revolutionary aren't so hard, especially if you take the tempo down a notch or two.

As for Liszt, pieces like Un Sospiro and Liebestraum should be within your reach. Also, some Rachmaninov preludes are easier than they sound when you get to know them.

Mozart Sonatas are a must, Sonata K330 is a personal favorite of mine.
I think almost all the above are considerably beyond an appropriate level based on the OP's latest and recent rep and the fact that he said he doesn't play them quite up to speed.

IMO more appropriate Mozart pieces would be something like the Rondo in D major or Fantasy in d minor.

Chopin options would be the Waltz(L'Adieu), Waltz in a minor Op. 34 No. 2, and Preludes in D flat major, e minor, b minor, A flat major.

Ravel: Forlane from Le Tombeau de Couperin or Pavane for a Dead Princess.

Liszt: Consolation in D flat or transcription of Schubert's Litanei.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxA7VjOn35U

Rachmaninov: Prelude in D from Op. 23 or the transcription of Vocalise by Fiorentino.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q30JUz8jn9E



I love most of these you said, particurlaly Pavane for a dead princess, but it kinda looks a bit hard at some sections in the score, but ill give a try at it.




Originally Posted by achoo42
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by achoo42
Originally Posted by alu1
Well, I really love Chopin, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Mozart, Liszt, Debussy, Saint-Saëns. These are the composers I like to hear a lot. There are others, but these are my selection, even for when I am more advanced.


Start on a Chopin etude or two. Black Keys and Revolutionary aren't so hard, especially if you take the tempo down a notch or two.

As for Liszt, pieces like Un Sospiro and Liebestraum should be within your reach. Also, some Rachmaninov preludes are easier than they sound when you get to know them.

Mozart Sonatas are a must, Sonata K330 is a personal favorite of mine.
I think almost all the above are considerably beyond an appropriate level based on the OP's latest and recent rep and the fact that he said he doesn't play them quite up to speed.

IMO more appropriate Mozart pieces would be something like the Rondo in D major or Fantasy in d minor.

Chopin options would be the Waltz(L'Adieu), Waltz in a minor Op. 34 No. 2, and Preludes in D flat major, e minor, b minor, A flat major.

Ravel: Forlane from Le Tombeau de Couperin or Pavane for a Dead Princess.

Liszt: Consolation in D flat or transcription of Schubert's Litanei.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxA7VjOn35U

Rachmaninov: Prelude in D from Op. 23 or the transcription of Vocalise by Fiorentino.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q30JUz8jn9E



I did miss the part where he said they were below tempo, I (incorrectly) assumed that his list of repertoire was indicative of the level he was finished with.

In that case, I guess my list would be for "the next level", probably after about a year of study.


No problem at all, i will work hard to get to this level in one year =)


Originally Posted by BDB
There are probably at least 50 Chopin pieces which are better to start with than any of the etudes, and even Chopin would have said so. You would be better off to start with the Mazurkas, Nocturnes, or Waltzes.


Love them, which nocturnes are appropiate for me, do u think? I had worked on some waltzes of him too.

Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878638 08/11/19 06:22 PM
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You should just get copies of the complete Mazurkas, Nocturnes, and Waltzes, and look through them. Learn to read through them well enough to get an idea whether you would like them or not, learn what seems comfortable for your situation, and learn to recognize what might be too difficult for now. If you learn to evaluate those factors, the skills you get will be assets to your progress in your musical studies. The most valuable skill that you can get from your education is learning how to learn.

You may never get to the point that you can make a career out of playing the piano. But if you learn to learn, if you become flexible, you will be successful, even if you are not successful in what you expect to become.


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Re: Help with repertoire
BDB #2878657 08/11/19 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by BDB
You should just get copies of the complete Mazurkas, Nocturnes, and Waltzes, and look through them. Learn to read through them well enough to get an idea whether you would like them or not, learn what seems comfortable for your situation, and learn to recognize what might be too difficult for now. If you learn to evaluate those factors, the skills you get will be assets to your progress in your musical studies. The most valuable skill that you can get from your education is learning how to learn.

You may never get to the point that you can make a career out of playing the piano. But if you learn to learn, if you become flexible, you will be successful, even if you are not successful in what you expect to become.


Thanks for this advice.

Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2878862 08/12/19 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by alu1

Love them, which nocturnes are appropriate for me, do u think? I had worked on some waltzes of him too.

Based on your initial post, I suspect we are around the same level. I also learned Tchaikovsky's October and I'm finally completing Clair De Lune, although it was a stretch piece for me.

I love the Liszt Consolation in Db, and wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.

I also worked on 2 Chopin Nocturnes. They are among the easier ones, but absolutely beautiful.
- Nocturne 20 Posthumous in C# min
- Nocturne 72.1 Emin


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Re: Help with repertoire
BDB #2878921 08/12/19 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by BDB
There are probably at least 50 Chopin pieces which are better to start with than any of the etudes, and even Chopin would have said so. You would be better off to start with the Mazurkas, Nocturnes, or Waltzes.

Correction applied in quote.


My chronological list of the top 20 composers: Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schumann, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms, Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, Debussy, Bartok, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich.
Re: Help with repertoire
cmb13 #2879018 08/12/19 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by cmb13
Originally Posted by alu1

Love them, which nocturnes are appropriate for me, do u think? I had worked on some waltzes of him too.

Based on your initial post, I suspect we are around the same level. I also learned Tchaikovsky's October and I'm finally completing Clair De Lune, although it was a stretch piece for me.

I love the Liszt Consolation in Db, and wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.

I also worked on 2 Chopin Nocturnes. They are among the easier ones, but absolutely beautiful.
- Nocturne 20 Posthumous in C# min
- Nocturne 72.1 Emin


It's a very nice piece indeed. I've done October has 2 years, and i was wanting to learn more of Tchaiskovsky, I like most of his compositions. I was afraid to tackle some of Chopin's pieces because of some very unusual polyrhythms but now i just discovered that some of them are actually "fiorituras", which i didn't know what was that, but now that i know i feel more confident to face his compositions. haha

Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2879072 08/13/19 06:14 AM
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Originally Posted by alu1
Originally Posted by cmb13
Originally Posted by alu1

Love them, which nocturnes are appropriate for me, do u think? I had worked on some waltzes of him too.

Based on your initial post, I suspect we are around the same level. I also learned Tchaikovsky's October and I'm finally completing Clair De Lune, although it was a stretch piece for me.

I love the Liszt Consolation in Db, and wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.

I also worked on 2 Chopin Nocturnes. They are among the easier ones, but absolutely beautiful.
- Nocturne 20 Posthumous in C# min
- Nocturne 72.1 Emin


It's a very nice piece indeed. I've done October has 2 years, and i was wanting to learn more of Tchaiskovsky, I like most of his compositions. I was afraid to tackle some of Chopin's pieces because of some very unusual polyrhythms but now i just discovered that some of them are actually "fiorituras", which i didn't know what was that, but now that i know i feel more confident to face his compositions. haha

You taught me something - I was not familiar with that term and had to look it up. There’s a Graham Fitch video on Fiorituras which I saved to watch later.

If you really like Tchaikovsky, as I do, why not just do some more of the Seasons collection? I bought the Henle volume and browse through it from time to time, although I have not committed to fully learning another one yet due to time constraints. There’s just not enough time to learn everything I would like to learn! Once I finish Clair de Lune, my plan is to tackle easier music that I can get through more quickly, so as to cover more ground in my education.


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Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2879131 08/13/19 09:23 AM
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In fact, here's a link to the Graham Fitch video on the Fioritura. Excellent video.



The 4 runs, including the 35 note run, at the end of the Nocturne in C# min are nothing more than C#min, or E maj, scales. They have different starting and ending positions, but with some practice, if you can play your scales, you can play these runs without too much difficulty.


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Re: Help with repertoire
alu1 #2879259 08/13/19 03:16 PM
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I saw this video too, it's great for the understand of it. In the time you did those nocturnes you must have done them with fioritura but "unconsciously", i remember that i've done his Nocturne op 9 no.2 and there was some parts just like that and when i was listening to performers they actually let the right hand free while the left waits for it, but i've just found now this term, it's a very interesting style of composition.

Re: Help with repertoire
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Originally Posted by alu1


Old repertoire:

- Debussy: Clair de lune
- Bach: Little preludes BWV 936, BWV 937
- Bach: Invention No.8 F major
- Tchaikovsky - The Seasons, Op. 37a : October

I had played other pieces that i just can't remember. I can't play my lastest repertoire at the full speed like some pros does, but in a acceptable tempo. I would like some recommendations of repertoire that i can continue learning, anything is acceptable for me, i also like challenges.

I love these following pieces, are them approchable for me?

- Tchaikovsky - The Seasons, Op. 37a : August
- Scarlatti Sonata in F minor K.466
- Debussy: Ballade, L, 70
- Schubert: Impromptu, D899,Op.90: II Alegro



I have just got the Tchaikovsky series. I am playing July at the moment. August I would suggest you wait until you have got your teacher back. It is quite fast pace and if you learn yourself you will probably have to relearn again when your teacher returns. It will be harder and I would just wait until your teacher is back so they can go through it with you. Have you looked at the rest. June is a popular one and is slower and I think may be more approachable? Schubert impromptu are hard. It needs help I think. I would definitely think a teacher for this. Scalatti K466 is amazing. Why dont you do that one? I think that should be doable. Excellent piece !

Originally Posted by alu1
I am most interested right now in August by Tchaikosvky. Are there any other pieces suggestions you could give me?


Unforuately this sort of piece is fast and lively are difficult. I know from Mendelssohn music you may like. Maybe the first would be doable for you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rt25qJV4-_I
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHVdJAed8_4

There are pieces which are scherzo which are normally quite similar spikey and fast. If you google scherzo there may be some by other composers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7Ag4mzpf04
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKEi-U8-_oo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juANkdrVMdw (Mendelssohn / Rachmaninoff)

Pavane for a dead princess. My teacher gave the score to me and it is very intimidating. Also it gets more and more notes. It is very scary score. I would not try without a teacher.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7J969kHqK70

Ultimately we cant answer what pieces will be approachable. you have to try and see.

Last edited by Moo :); 08/13/19 03:31 PM.
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