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Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... #2871971
07/23/19 04:27 PM
07/23/19 04:27 PM
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I'm feeling a bit philosophical tonight, so forgive me for the rambling...

To summarize: I just started a YouTube channel recently, and, being an amateur with no formal training, coupled with the fact that I'm doing everything on my own (performing, recording, audio editing, video editing, etc.), the sheer amount of work I have to put in to put out performances which is presumably child's play for professionals can be rather daunting and discouraging.

Tonight in particular, I'm thinking - well, there are so many established pianists out there today, most with infallible technique that I most likely will never be able to compete with...not to mention all the great recordings pianists of the past have left us. Which brings me to the ultimate question: why bother?

I can think of many reasons why I would keep on playing privately, sight-reading music and playing old pieces just for my own pleasure. Ever since my high school days, despite being able to put on a friendly mask when I need to in social situations, I've always been an intensely private person. I suppose it's a bit easier to open up in the online world, but come real life, I do my very best not to let on any issues or problems going on in my life. And this is where music has always come in. I can think of so many emotional "functions" it's served for me. I remember back in my high school days, after all the monotonous homework was done, I'd lock myself up in my room, turn the lights off, and listen to Rachmaninoff's Second on my CD player (an ancient artifact) while perusing through nature photography that I had downloaded onto my computer. It let me escape from what in retrospect was a rather chaotic and abuse-infested life. It calmed me. It soothed me. It served as an outlet for emotions I didn't even know I was capable of feeling.

Years would go by, and as my awareness of more repertoire increased, so did music's role in my life. If I was angry, there was Prokofiev's 7th Sonata. If I was hurt, there was Faure's Pavane or Chopin's C Minor Nocturne. If I was traveling, there was Kabalevsky's Third Concerto. If I was lonely, there were Rachmaninoff's Etudes. If I needed to psych myself up for something, there was Chopin's F# Minor Polonaise. If I was depressed about the world, there was the Bach-Busoni Chaconne.

Looking back at my development, I can see how as I got more and more hooked on music, and I tried sight-reading (badly) through pieces that stole my heart, somewhere along the way, I had this incredulous idea that maybe it wasn't too late to become a Pianist with a capital P. Paderewski did it late, could it be so hard?

Yes. Yes it can.

Recording many pieces has been a recent thing for me, and, unsurprisingly, it's been a slap to the face that has deflated an over-optimistic and idealistic ego, pulling it from the sky where it once knew bliss. You just don't sound as good as your ears tell you. I shudder at the thought of how I must've sounded when I performed before. With much of my dreams bathed in vanity shot down over the last month or so, I've started slow, recording pieces that I was more technically-equipped to handle. Now, I'm far away from the studio I had rented to record a few month's worth of performances, back in a different country, equipped only with a DP, reflecting on a labyrinth of a project I started.

Which, finally brings me back to the question - why keep recording?

I've had some decent feedback. I won't lie - I probably check my phone every hour or so to see if I got a new "like" or comment or subscriber or whatever. It's nice when it happens, sure. But, is that really all there is to it? Surely not. At least, I sure hope not.

It's such a different thing - performing for an audience, and just playing for yourself. At least, it is for me. And I just can't help but keep asking myself - why am I doing this? Is it to satisfy an ego? Chasing a dream, as it were? I don't think I can deny those things. But beyond that - do I have something new and original to say in my interpretations? And is there an audience out there who would be receptive to it, if I did have those qualities in my performances? Do I even have potential?

It makes me wonder why pros perform. I guess the two obvious answers are, well, because they can, and, because they need food on the table. Crass, but everyone needs to make a living. So then...is there any space at all for an amateur to squeeze through? My own answer to that is rather depressing. Which, again, brings me back to that question - why keep doing it?

Now, I'm sort of allowing myself to venture into the realms of psychoanalysis and a world out of touch with reality. Maybe deep down, I feel like the only way I can really connect is through my piano playing? Maybe I want to be understood, and this is the only way I feel it's possible, through music? Perhaps a burning urge to share, communicate and express? Maybe it's a journey to be valued for something that has become such an integral part of my life? Maybe it's because I feel if I'm not appreciated for my music, I don't feel like I really exist? If only my fingers could do what I need them to do, which brings me back to that other question, do I have potential? Is all the practicing simply a waste of time? Is this entire thing a waste of time?

I'm traveling down the rabbit hole quite a bit here. I wonder if pros do or ever did wrestle with these questions. And to think of all the prodigies out there, or all the young talents out there with proper education and an environment conducive to their development - things which I never had...all of this makes me wonder, has my reliance on music become something that will end up devouring me and ruining my life?

And here comes the dreaded question: do I just give up?

Pondering that question now has me wondering...does anyone else think about that? Amateurs striving to become pros, in particular. Did any of you feel like that was the logical thing to do, but there's this inexplicable force in you preventing you from pulling the plug? If you know what I'm talking about...what exactly is this...thing?

Well. I see I've rambled a lot here. I actually don't think there's any way I can conclude this jumble of thoughts nicely. I'm not even sure where I was going with this, to be honest. I guess - my technique and musicianship aside - I'm just wondering if there's anyone out there who has had similar issues as I am having right now, and who has wrestled with some of these questions. I do feel like I'm improving but, is it too little too late?

Last edited by PianoYos; 07/23/19 04:31 PM.
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Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? [Re: PianoYos] #2871983
07/23/19 04:50 PM
07/23/19 04:50 PM
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There would be a lot to unpack here if I were to attempt to respond to all of your questions, so I'll leave the rest to the others on this forum, but to comment on a few:

First and foremost, it sounds like music is very important to you, so definitely don't quit. Your ability to play the piano has absolutely nothing to do with whether you should continue.

I'm in no way an expert on psychology, but maybe you should consider attempting a somewhat balanced lifestyle of social vs anti-social moments (I lean heavy to the anti-social myself) because things can get pretty out of control if you don't try to balance even a little.

As far as comparing yourself to others, it doesn't do you any good. More importantly, it's absolutely meaningless. If I could play the bottom slowest 10% of music that Gilels played, and play it like Gilels, then that would be more than I could ever hope. Of course playing like him even for very slow pieces takes massive technique, but this isn't the type of technique that most people notice or even consider as technique.

Good luck with your channel!

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872010
07/23/19 05:56 PM
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Are you hoping to turn pro? In what way?

If you are just hoping to make money from your YT videos, why not? That's not dependent on how well you can play. In fact, I'd guess that the most watched videos about classical piano playing on YT are by charismatic, attractive young people giving simple advice - the sort of advice anyone with a decent teacher would have heard already. (The second most popular videos are by cute babies in diapers playing Islamey, but you cannot turn the clock back - not yet anyway.......)

Otherwise, there are other ways to make money from music - but they require lots more skills than just being able to play at a good level. In fact, most pros make their living not from performing, but from teaching, accompanying, collaborating, directing, etc. Do you have good musical and people skills?

I know someone - the ex-husband of a good friend - who was a promising budding concert pianist just graduated from a conservatoire, with a few small competition wins under his belt. Unfortunately, he discovered he couldn't make a living from giving concerts in small venues - he barely broke even with them. And unless he won a major competition like the Tchaikovsky, he couldn't get concerts in big halls. He wasn't interested in teaching, or scraping a meagre living from odd musical jobs. So.....he changed career in his early twenties, and retrained as a doctor. He now makes a comfortable income working in a top hospital and just plays his piano for fun to entertain friends and relatives at home. Sometimes, he plays a recital for charity, and that's more than enough to satisfy his performance cravings (what's left of them).

Incidentally, have a look at this ex-concert pianist's CV:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naida_Cole

Her CD of French music was the most impressive I'd heard for a long time, and her Liszt Sonata (etc) CD came close, yet she decided to change tack even when many critics thought she could become Canada's second most famous pianist....

As for me, the choice was easy - I had no talent and started learning piano far too late (at ten) to have any chance of being very good when young. So, it always remained a hobby for me, as I pursued a rather more secure (and dare I say it, lucrative) career all through high school and university, which enabled me to travel, see the world, climb big mountains.......and now, in my old age, play recitals for audiences. Not for money - I never made any (and didn't want to make any) - but for the satisfaction of being a proselytizer for the cause of classical music, in which (even if I say so myself wink ), I have been reasonably successful. So, to my mind, I have far surpassed all my childhood ambitions in my piano playing: I didn't have any then, certainly none as far as performing in public as concerned (I suffered, and still suffer from performance anxiety). I never left classical music even in the decades when I didn't have a piano to practice on. Would I still retain my love for playing the piano if I was struggling to make my living from it? Who knows?

These days, with the internet and YT etc, there are many more ways of making money from piano than actually performing live for audiences. And you don't need to be a virtuoso pianist......but you do need to be very resourceful.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872066
07/23/19 09:25 PM
07/23/19 09:25 PM
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I tried to be a professional pianist before I knew how hard it was, and completely "failed." I used to think about a lot of the same stuff that you are, and ultimately I realized that I was over-thinking things. I have accomplished more and enjoyed myself more as an amateur compared to when I was in school studying.

A profession is just a means of making money, it has no bearing on whether you should be playing music or not. If you feel the need to play music - if you think music has intrinsic value - than play music! If it makes you feel things profoundly, keep playing music!
If something is inherently good or speaks to you, you don't need to invent justifications to partake in it.

One thing I will point out is that there is an incredible world of opportunity open to amateur musicians nowadays. Events like Piano Texas, the Cliburn Amateur Competition, the Boston Amateur Competition, etc, etc, etc offer chances to enjoy music with others who truly do understand, improve your musicianship, set goals to practice for, and even perform with the same exact symphony orchestras that professionals do. These events do not discriminate based on your life story, your late start, etc, etc - it's simply how well you play. And if you are not up to full competition level, some like Piano Texas even offer Observer opportunities where you can attend, take lessons, learn, and enjoy the camaraderie of others who enjoy music as much as you do in a non-threatening environment.

My point in mentioning this is twofold:

1. If your goal is simply to enjoy, communicate, and better understand the rich remarkable world of music we have, amateurs can do this equally well (or perhaps with more freedom) than professional musicians - even if your goal is to play a concerto with a major orchestra

2. There is no timeframe that you should try to fit yourself into regardless of your age. You have the rest of your life to figure this out - enjoy the journey, it is a remarkable one.


Last edited by computerpro3; 07/23/19 09:26 PM.
Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872088
07/23/19 11:59 PM
07/23/19 11:59 PM
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If you give up, it will probably eat away at you. Then you'll return to it many years later, and regret the time you wasted.

All you can do is strive to keep getting better. That can only lead you to something good.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872098
07/24/19 01:00 AM
07/24/19 01:00 AM
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In my younger days I had exposure to a few instruments like a recorder and then violin. I have taken music classes in high school and listened to a lot of piano & harpsichord music but would not imagine myself playing because of the L-R hands coordination issue.

When I started working, I had some personal & family issues and took up playing keyboard to reduce stress and continued playing to this day. Hands coordination isn't a big deal anymore. Being able to play even an easy piece brightens up the day. Many of us may have started too late to become a professional but I don't think people need to start early for personal enjoyment.

Some people in my family took lessons before and passed conservatory exams are no longer playing. Everybody have their own reasons to get into music. A lot of kids get enrolled into music lessons because their parents wanted them to get into it. When we are older, we make our own decisions and the reason for playing music is more personal.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872214
07/24/19 11:01 AM
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I think you will enjoy more the music as an amateur than while being a pro, and to me it seems your thinking is refreshingly overengineered. Being a pro is not about enjoyment of music, it is about performing a job and get a decent leaving out of it. I am not saying that pro players do not occasionally enjoy what they are doing, but it is like any other profession; there are boring and repetitive aspects to it and a few pleasant ones. And there is an extremely small elite of worldclass players who are on the top and an incredingly higher number who just manage to leave decently out of it, and some not decently at all.

If you want to make music your profession, why not, but then you have to think of it as a pro would, and that is from a business standpoint; what would be your specialty, what do you market, how do you plan to get revenue out of it. The question is not if you can become a virtuoso player but what is it that you can do which is within your reach that would give you that stable revenue.

I have chosen not to pursue music as a business and I do not regret that choice as I still can play what I like and also have a good profession. Others have explained it quite well already. But that is my personal choice.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: Sidokar] #2872252
07/24/19 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Sidokar
Being a pro is not about enjoyment of music, it is about performing a job and get a decent leaving out of it. I am not saying that pro players do not occasionally enjoy what they are doing, but it is like any other profession; there are boring and repetitive aspects to it and a few pleasant ones. And there is an extremely small elite of worldclass players who are on the top and an incredingly higher number who just manage to leave decently out of it, and some not decently at all.


I think it was Harold Bauer that said his best day as a professional was when he retired from performing.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872253
07/24/19 01:04 PM
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Thank you for your input, everyone - I've read all of them and it's been tremendously helpful getting different perspectives on this. I'll try to respond to everyone individually when I can.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872271
07/24/19 01:59 PM
07/24/19 01:59 PM
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The OP is a little too rambling for me. I admit I only read a few paragraphs because it was just too long but my response is as follows:

My decision to return to piano lessons as an adult amateur is purely for personal enjoyment. Yes there is a level of ego to it as well, hearing someone I know in my professional circle (law) who claims they only started lessons in their 30s and can play the Chopin E Major Etude (Op 10/3) that sounds as good as Murray Perahia or Kissin inspires me to think “if that person can do it why can’t I?”. So there is a level of internal competitiveness that pushes me to focus hard on my skills and practice. I follow Tiffany Poon and her practice sessions are enlightening and realistic. I feel being a great pianist is more like 90% hard work/perseverance/discipline and 10% other stuff like actual talent/musical ear or perfect pitch.

Last edited by AssociateX; 07/24/19 02:01 PM.

~~~~~~~
Finished:
1. Brahms Intermezzo Op 118/2
2. Beethoven Sonata Op 2/1 (1st mvmnt)

Working on:
1. Beethoven Sonata Op 2 # 1 (2nd-3rd mvmnts)
2. Chopin Prelude Op 28 # 24
3. Chopin Nocturne Op 48/1
*****************
My YouTube Channel :

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNj0Yha5exOWuJMTezV3t8Q
Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872275
07/24/19 02:11 PM
07/24/19 02:11 PM
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I think it's only natural to hope that people enjoy your performances, and it's a good feeling when you get that validation. However, I think it is as simple as this... if you enjoy performing and it makes people happy (even if it's not everyone), then there is great value in that. The nice thing about being an amateur is your livelihood doesn't depend on it. If you're not the best or if there are people who don't enjoy your style, that's ok. The opinion of a few people does not define who you are or your value or the beauty you choose to bring to the world.

As far as YouTube goes, the thing about technology nowadays is once it's out there, it's out there forever and you can be loved or criticized forever. If you find yourself beginning to worry too much about how many likes or dislikes or the kinds of comments you get, then maybe YouTube isn't the thing to do. Just play live! smile


aka Lady Arabesque
YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/hayburner1969
Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: Sidokar] #2872279
07/24/19 02:22 PM
07/24/19 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Sidokar
. Being a pro is not about enjoyment of music, it is about performing a job and get a decent leaving out of it. I am not saying that pro players do not occasionally enjoy what they are doing, but it is like any other profession; there are boring and repetitive aspects to it and a few pleasant ones. And there is an extremely small elite of worldclass players who are on the top and an incredingly higher number who just manage to leave decently out of it, and some not decently at all.

I think many professionals enjoy their jobs far more than you say. Certainly, the ones I know virtually all fall in that category. In fact, one could say that most musicians probably knew the chance of making a lot of money was small so that they were motivated by their need to perform or love of music.

In terms of the financial rewards you listed three groups but I think you left out a significant group who make a comfortable if not spectacular living from their work.

Last edited by pianoloverus; 07/24/19 02:26 PM.
Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: pianoloverus] #2872307
07/24/19 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by pianoloverus

I think many professionals enjoy their jobs far more than you say. Certainly, the ones I know virtually all fall in that category. In fact, one could say that most musicians probably knew the chance of making a lot of money was small so that they were motivated by their need to perform or love of music.

In terms of the financial rewards you listed three groups but I think you left out a significant group who make a comfortable if not spectacular living from their work.


Well, I did not put any stats and there aren't any probably, so everybody can think and say what he wants. And then there are so many different situations/jobs that discussing in such a broad context is not leading very far.

I think it is with the piano profession like it is with any other profession and you can be an artist in many areas. There are people who love their job, being a physician, a dentist, a lawyer, an engineer, a mason, a cook or anything else. And in all these professions, there are the good sides and the boring ones.

Being a pro imply that you do your work (not play) with the objective of doing the job expected from you, with the proper level of quality and also because you are paid for it; so when a pianist performs , he/she is focused on delivering the proper performance, not seating playing and enjoying the evening for his own pleasure - that does not prevent him/her from being deeply satisfied doing this work. I also like to cook as an amateur and it is fun, but would I enjoy it so much if I had to do it in a small kitchen, with steam and noise, hot and under pressure to deliver fast and well , ... probably not. It is already much less fun when I have to do it every day at regular hours with the obligation to produce an acceptable result.

So a pro is unlike an amateur who is doing it for its own pleasure and with no obligation of result other than his own expectations. With the profession come obligations, constraints, repetitiveness, pressure, anxiety, conflicts and also fulfillement of some inner desires, some being related to the love of music and others not at all. Music is subject to those like any other profession and like in any profession, there are people who deeply like what they do, some not so much and people who do it because they have no better option.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872467
07/25/19 02:24 AM
07/25/19 02:24 AM
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I saw your question as "why keep recording?"
Youtube, like all social media platforms, is a lion''s den. If you open your videos up to comments you need a thick skin. If you are struggling with those comments at the moment, you might want to think about using this as an opportunity to work on thickening your skin up. A motive for putting your stuff "out there" doesn't have to be music-related - it could be more about developing your resilience .
Whether you want to or not is something to mull over. Personally I can take Youtube criticism on the chin mostly. Occasionally I get hurtful comments and I tend to delete them as it helps me to forget them, but it's been quite a useful learning experience for me. (My videos are not piano performance but it's the same difference ).
I follow quite a few young musicians on Instagram who post their practice videos warts and all. Interestingly they rarely get negative criticism. Not sure if this is just the nature of Instagram over Youtube or whether it's because they say from the start they are still students, so no one expects perfection. Do you make it clear on your channel that you're a self taught amateur?

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: coaster] #2872502
07/25/19 06:12 AM
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Originally Posted by coaster
... if you enjoy performing and it makes people happy (even if it's not everyone), then there is great value in that. The nice thing about being an amateur is your livelihood doesn't depend on it. If you're not the best or if there are people who don't enjoy your style, that's ok. The opinion of a few people does not define who you are or your value or the beauty you choose to bring to the world.



I agree totally with this. After having read the whole OP I felt that something was missing in the arguments. First, there was a deep and sincere expression of the love for music, with deep and personal relations to certain pieces. Without this love, a professional career would be totally pointless. I think it is a sad thing when I read all these "I want to become a concert pianist" postings, there are tons of them in every piano forum, and few of them express this love. Instead it seems to be a general wish of being praised, being a star. Yeah, it is easy to get dazzled by the atmosphere after a great concert when the pianist has performed brilliantly and receives standing ovations and flowers ... How great to be able to play that well, we think. How great to stand there and shine ...

But we also know what happens to artists and other celebs that are driven by their hunger for approval, rather than their love for what they are doing. For many, it ends in a very tragic way. Approval does not come from outside, but from inside. If the only thing you can think of - even when you are practicing - is what others will say, you will be very unhappy because the real approval, the one from your own soul, is missing. And your soul will finally cry its protests louder than the cheers from the public.

The glamour around celebrated concert pianists is highly overrated. I have seen their lives from a close perspective, it is mostly a dog's life, often very lonely. If you want to become rich and famous, there are easier ways.

But! What if you define your relation with a presumtive audience like this instead: it is a great feeling to make others happy.

Imagine that you give a recital and afterwards you see people wiping tears from their eyes, and then they hug you and tell you that they loved your playing, that it brought up so many good memories or whatever - wouldn't you find that all your effors were worth the price then? So what if there were 5000 people in the audience or just 5, so what if they are poor old seniors or some prominent royalties? When they truly love your playing, you will know it was worth it. You gave them a fantastic experience, maybe one they will remember all their life.

So I know a concert pianist. We are just friends, not even very close friends, but I totally fell in love with his playing and since then I have been to many, many of his recitals. I have wept to some of his interpretations, I have almost danced my way back to the hotel sometimes, so high with happiness that I hardly could sleep afterwards. And soon I became jealous or should we say inspired, so I took up piano playing again at the age of 45 and now piano playing really is my life. Do I want to be a pro? No. I mean, why? I make a living in a more convenient way. But I finally conquered my stage fright and played for an audience again and it was not the horror experience I remembered from my teen days, but it was fun. And I think my pianist friend is also proud of being an inspiration source.

I have also discovered some nice, female composers, now almost forgotten, whose music I would love to present for an audience. I also hope to be an inspiration source for other middle-aged wannabe pianists who believe it is "too late" to pick up playing again. No, it is never too late. Why comparing yourself so much to others, why being so competitive? Music is ART! Music is LOVE. Most people who fall in love, do not care if their love interest is not considered a stunning beauty in the eyes of others - they only care about their own perception. Shouldn't piano playing be the same?

So just keep on playing if you love it. Keep on sharing your joy with others. Don't value your audience, thinking that it is more important to please the audience in Carneige Hall or some competition jury than playing for a little senior home with people in wheelchairs or just the neighbours at their anniversary party.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872506
07/25/19 06:28 AM
07/25/19 06:28 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,280
Florida
dogperson Offline

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dogperson  Offline

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Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,280
Florida
Ghosthand
What a wonderful post! Thanks for sharing your joy of playing


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
" I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It’s ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: Brahms4] #2872656
07/25/19 02:40 PM
07/25/19 02:40 PM
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 192
Connecticut, USA
MichaelJK Offline

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MichaelJK  Offline

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Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 192
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted by Brahms4
I saw your question as "why keep recording?"
Youtube, like all social media platforms, is a lion''s den. If you open your videos up to comments you need a thick skin. If you are struggling with those comments at the moment, you might want to think about using this as an opportunity to work on thickening your skin up. A motive for putting your stuff "out there" doesn't have to be music-related - it could be more about developing your resilience .


This is great advice.

You get to choose what you want to be about. Every action you take.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: ghosthand] #2872660
07/25/19 02:45 PM
07/25/19 02:45 PM
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 132
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PianoYos Offline OP
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PianoYos  Offline OP
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Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 132
Thank you everyone again for responding. I really wasn't expecting such an overwhelming response. I don't think I can reply to everyone's posts because there's so much wealth of knowledge and perspectives in each of them, but please know I've read all of them and I'm really grateful all of you took the time to respond and guide me.

Originally Posted by ghosthand
After having read the whole OP I felt that something was missing in the arguments. First, there was a deep and sincere expression of the love for music, with deep and personal relations to certain pieces. Without this love, a professional career would be totally pointless. I think it is a sad thing when I read all these "I want to become a concert pianist" postings, there are tons of them in every piano forum, and few of them express this love.

Thank you so much for saying this. I don't know why, but it's a huge relief and comfort to know that someone out there "gets" this part of me. It makes everything fall into place, and I wonder if this was the critical "key" missing in my thoughts. Your entire post is amazing - there is so much wisdom in it, and I'm going to be taking a lot out of it as I push forward.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: PianoYos] #2872694
07/25/19 04:58 PM
07/25/19 04:58 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 4,062
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Hakki Online content
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Hakki  Online Content
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Joined: May 2001
Posts: 4,062
Your channel is very good. Besides, IMO, recording and publishing your videos might help develop your playing because you might get responses.
Congratulations on your new channel and keep going. There is no reason to give up. You are doing fine.

Re: Why do you perform/play the piano? An amateur's ramblings... [Re: Hakki] #2872739
07/25/19 08:15 PM
07/25/19 08:15 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,619
In the Ozarks of Missouri
NobleHouse Offline
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NobleHouse  Offline
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Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,619
In the Ozarks of Missouri
Originally Posted by Hakki
Your channel is very good. Besides, IMO, recording and publishing your videos might help develop your playing because you might get responses.
Congratulations on your new channel and keep going. There is no reason to give up. You are doing fine.


Agree 100%! Nice channel and keep it up. It really could help develop your playing.


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