Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
120 registered members (Animisha, AssociateX, akc42, ArturC, 604Rakuda, ando, astrotoy, accordeur, Abdol, AnnInMiami, 29 invisible), 1,556 guests, and 8 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 4 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: The Monkeys] #2871064
07/20/19 10:06 PM
07/20/19 10:06 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,384
*sigh* Salt Lake City
malkin Offline
5000 Post Club Member
malkin  Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,384
*sigh* Salt Lake City
Here's a new tack:

Go to the BBC on the www, whatever it is called where you live.
Go to sport. You'll see a list of the popular ones, but then click on ALL SPORT.
Then you'll get a longer list to choose from:
American Football
Athletics
Basketball
Boxing
Cricket
Cycling
Darts
Disability Sport
Football
Formula 1
Gaelic Games
Get Inspired
Golf
Gymnastics
Horse Racing
MMA
Motorsport
Netball
Olympic Sport
Rugby League
Rugby Union
Snooker
Swimming
Tennis
Winter Sports

If that isn't enough, there's a link to "Full Sports A-Z" and you know what? There are more in the list, but no piano, no math, no chess.


Learner
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: The Monkeys] #2871117
07/21/19 05:22 AM
07/21/19 05:22 AM
Joined: Apr 2019
Posts: 174
Hawai'i Island
B
BigIslandGuy Offline
Full Member
BigIslandGuy  Offline
Full Member
B

Joined: Apr 2019
Posts: 174
Hawai'i Island
I'm just wondering when we'll hear about piano competitions that require anti-doping tests. JK.

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: BigIslandGuy] #2871120
07/21/19 06:04 AM
07/21/19 06:04 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
Originally Posted by BigIslandGuy
I'm just wondering when we'll hear about piano competitions that require anti-doping tests. JK.

A secret that no-one wants to talk about: many classical musicians take beta-blockers (usually propranolol) before their concerts.

Not just soloists (where of course, a bad nervy performance can cost them a competition win and/or their career), but also orchestral players. I have a clarinettist friend who takes propranolol if she has important solos in a concert, but doesn't otherwise. Think about the solo in this, for example, and what it means if you fluff it because of nerves when everyone in the audience is looking at you:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNRxHyZDU-Q

But why not avail yourself of something that enables you to perform as well as you would when practicing, when out of the spotlight?

After all, performing classical music is not a sport (unlike archery, shooting etc where beta blockers are banned).


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: malkin] #2871121
07/21/19 06:28 AM
07/21/19 06:28 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
Originally Posted by malkin
Here's a new tack:

Go to the BBC on the www, whatever it is called where you live.
Go to sport. You'll see a list of the popular ones, but then click on ALL SPORT.
Then you'll get a longer list to choose from:
American Football
Athletics
Basketball
Boxing
Cricket
Cycling
Darts
Disability Sport
Football
Formula 1
Gaelic Games
Get Inspired
Golf
Gymnastics
Horse Racing
MMA
Motorsport
Netball
Olympic Sport
Rugby League
Rugby Union
Snooker
Swimming
Tennis
Winter Sports

If that isn't enough, there's a link to "Full Sports A-Z" and you know what? There are more in the list, but no piano, no math, no chess.

I believe Highland Games is missing from that list.

Not to mention Worm Charming, Nettle Eating, Bog Snorkelling, Cheese Rolling and other important sports that we do in this green and pleasant land:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ks2bA1gWHsE


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: bennevis] #2871146
07/21/19 09:27 AM
07/21/19 09:27 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,384
*sigh* Salt Lake City
malkin Offline
5000 Post Club Member
malkin  Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,384
*sigh* Salt Lake City
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by malkin
Here's a new tack:

Go to the BBC on the www, whatever it is called where you live.
Go to sport. You'll see a list of the popular ones, but then click on ALL SPORT.
Then you'll get a longer list to choose from:
...

If that isn't enough, there's a link to "Full Sports A-Z" and you know what? There are more in the list, but no piano, no math, no chess.

I believe Highland Games is missing from that list.

Not to mention Worm Charming, Nettle Eating, Bog Snorkelling, Cheese Rolling and other important sports that we do in this green and pleasant land:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ks2bA1gWHsE


For coverage of Highland Games, I'd suggest contacting the BBC. The rest illustrate my point that not all competitions are sport.


Learner
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: Andamento] #2871289
07/21/19 07:47 PM
07/21/19 07:47 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,094
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,094
Canada
Andamento, I meant to reply before. Thanks for your response and time!
Originally Posted by Andamento


I know you know I'm a teacher. smile

I've been following this thread but don't really know what to add, as I see validity in a lot of the points being made. IOW, I don't know if the answer to the OP's thread title is a yes or a no.

That said, I'll respond to some of your July 12 post:

Thank you. smile
Quote

Quote
The question itself, and the fact that it got asked, probably highlights some major problems in the music scenario as a whole, esp. the "classical" world.


I'm not sure if you're saying that the competition aspect of part of the classical world is a problem, but my own view of musical competitions is that they're not a problem, in and of themselves. They can be a fantastic and enriching learning experience, or could be destructive, or anywhere in between, depending on many factors too numerous to mention.


I think I agree. I don't see any specific thing as being a problem by itself, but rather how and why a thing is implemented, the overall picture, and so on. For example, if music ends being seen as a competition; if motivation toward music in and of itself disappears entirely, and so on. It can also kill love for music, create anxiety. Another thing is that you get a standardization of what is acceptable, what the judges want to hear and so on. But I was not thinking of competition in particular, but the entire scene. I wanted to put forth the entire reality that I started to gather; the environment(s) of teachers, economic realities - everything. It is not some pure thing that exists in the ethers where teacher and student meet on some otherworldly cloud. If you are aware of this, then you can also be proactive - for example as a student. Also: if you get narrow impressions such as "music must be a sport", then it is good to realize that there is a broader picture, so you can expand that image. "Music is a sport where I am, in what I am perceiving." for example. If that makes sense.

Quote

Quote
Music per se is an expression of something; it's a story, or imagery, or something, that the composer has invented, to be interpreted in a mix of understanding and personal engagement. To do this, the musician needs a host of skills. He must have some understanding of genres, periods, composers, styles. He has to interpret this in details: through timing, rubato as needed or displaced notes, voicing, articulation, phrasing etc., which he can only do with that understand. He also needs the physical skills to pull that off and exquisite ears that hear and pre-hear. And then the audience ---- will they have the ears to hear it? Perhaps on a gut level, as in, "There is something about that performance which grabs me in an inexplicable way."


Agree with all of that.


smile

Quote

Quote
To teach at, or toward that level, requires a teacher who has all those skills, as well as the ability to teach. Furthermore, it requires students willing to work that way. By comparison, it is much easier to teach "fast, faster, fastest" with some bombast thrown in. You can hide other weaknesses in a flurry of notes, and the unsophisticated listener will ooh and ah at how fast it is.


The "fast, faster, fastest" part does get to be a problem when the goal is to quickly rise to a level the untrained ear will hear as glitzy playing. It also is a problem when students are taught to parrot a teacher and play competition pieces that are far beyond their reading level. An adjudicator won't know how a student learned the repertoire, and any comments to that student about observing things in the printed score will be of limited or no value to the one who isn't learning much of anything by reading.


There are some aspects here I had not thought of.

Quote

Quote
Meanwhile it is also a business and an industry. It is easier to get students, to get the attention of parents and students, if you throw in competitions; if you make it about grade levels which people understand from the world of schools and the artificial meritocracy of the workplace.


Yes, it's a business and an industry. However, as far as your second sentence, I haven't found the fact that I offer a competition-track option for piano lessons to be a big draw with most families new to my studio. The majority of them (with beginner students, anyway) choose the no-competition track.

I was glad to read that.

Quote
Quote
Thus it is not about what music "is", but how it gets presented, and why. Students and parents coming into the system will get impressions through the environment they find themselves in, which seems to be what this thing is.


How music gets presented is definitely important. I see the educational aspect of taking piano lessons as the first consideration. Is the student gaining valuable information and building a foundation of skills that will serve him well?


Yes! And that is the thing that I fear can get sacrificed the most often due to those kinds of forces. Those coming into it as students or parents may not even be aware of what things are skills foundations, or that there is such a thing. They may dismiss these things and be drawn to what is glitzier.

Quote

But there's also the aesthetic aspect of musicianship--bringing out the beauty of the art form. I believe students can learn to be expressive in their playing quite early in their musical development, and for some, entering auditions and competitions encourages them in their expressive efforts. I've heard this beauty come alive in many students during their competition preparation months, some at much younger ages than I was expression-minded as a student.

It's a joyous thing to witness.

Those must be rewarding. And this, also, is far removed from "sport". smile

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: Pinkiepie] #2871315
07/21/19 10:32 PM
07/21/19 10:32 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 370
USA
A
Andamento Offline
Full Member
Andamento  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 370
USA
Originally Posted by Pinkiepie
Before the holidays, my daughter's teacher talked to me about it. She told me that she no longer participates in these competitions, because most students lose the joy of playing when they have to work around the same piece for months, just so it's good enough not to be ashamed (in comparison).


This is a good point, Pinkiepie. Spending too much time on a piece can be a vitality- and joy-killer.

I've found that assigning students, whether they participate in competitions or not, music for different lengths of time helps keep a longer-term piece from becoming tedious. The variety (some easier pieces studied for a week or two, some slightly more difficult perhaps for a month, and a stretch piece now and then that will be in progress for 2-3 months), freshens up the whole experience. (Assuming none of the repertoire is beyond an appropriate difficulty level.)

If they decide they want to go the competition route, then, staying with a piece for a few months is something to which they're already been accustomed.

It's a very real danger, though, when one or more competition pieces dominate the curriculum because of the difficulty level of the piece(s). When winning competitions becomes the focus, there's a great temptation to choose music that's determined more by the competitor's peers' level than what is realistic for the competitor himself / herself.

That mindset can lead to the long, drawn-out preparation period for the competition music, not to mention the imbalance between competition pieces on the one hand, and non-competition pieces on the other, which are meant to build foundations. If the latter gets almost completely -- or worse, entirely -- ignored in the quest to examine every detail of a piece too much of a stretch above one's playing level, then certainly there is potential for stress and anxiety, as well as an over-focus on a narrow subset of repertoire.

This is where I feel it's really important to know the child well enough to determine what is a good length of time to be working on pieces. I don't have a set length of competition preparation for all my students who want to compete -- it's a very individual determination, and sometimes I learn some tweaking is necessary. smile

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: keystring] #2871318
07/21/19 10:48 PM
07/21/19 10:48 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 370
USA
A
Andamento Offline
Full Member
Andamento  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 370
USA
Lots of great points in your post, Keystring. Thank you!

Quote
I don't see any specific thing as being a problem by itself, but rather how and why a thing is implemented, the overall picture, and so on.


The overall picture is SO important. And, yes, the how to do things, and why do them, is integral to keeping the big picture in mind.

The big picture, to me, is considering how joy can be derived from the educational experience. What is one learning about music? What is one learning about oneself in the process?

How does playing enrich one's life; enrich the lives of others?

Quote
But I was not thinking of competition in particular, but the entire scene.


Good to know. Thanks for clarifying that.

Quote
I wanted to put forth the entire reality that I started to gather; the environment(s) of teachers, economic realities - everything.


I really like your broad approach -- your use of the word "entire." Looking at the forest instead of the individual trees, if you will.

That said, I'm curious about what you mean by economic realities. I'll let you tell me instead of me speculating. smile

Quote
Those must be rewarding. And this, also, is far removed from "sport".


(Sometimes I have to type things out to be on my way to discovering what I believe about a thing! Thanks for helping me see what I really do think about this "classical piano as a sport" thing -- great assist!) smile

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: The Monkeys] #2871328
07/21/19 11:38 PM
07/21/19 11:38 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,094
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,094
Canada
Andamento, by economic realities I mean:

Teacher has to make a living teaching. Maybe the local environment (the social milieu) has umpteen teachers, your local society tends to be competitive, wanting their tykes to to go through grade levels faster than the neighbours' kids - or whatever rocks the boat in that milieu. A teacher may not be able to make it unless she plays the game, whatever that game is. Or just an environment, common suppositions, and so on. Teachers and teaching are not in a pristine vacuum. If as a student or parent you know about some of those pressures, and you are not part of that scene, then you can tell a teacher up front, and possibly create different possibilities. Anyway, it's useful to know.

Thank you for your positive words, btw. smile

Quote
(Sometimes I have to type things out to be on my way to discovering what I believe about a thing! Thanks for helping me see what I really do think about this "classical piano as a sport" thing -- great assist!)


That - and exchanges - often help me in the same way.

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: keystring] #2871494
07/22/19 02:20 PM
07/22/19 02:20 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 370
USA
A
Andamento Offline
Full Member
Andamento  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 370
USA
Originally Posted by keystring
Andamento, by economic realities I mean:

Teacher has to make a living teaching. Maybe the local environment (the social milieu) has umpteen teachers, your local society tends to be competitive, wanting their tykes to to go through grade levels faster than the neighbours' kids - or whatever rocks the boat in that milieu. A teacher may not be able to make it unless she plays the game, whatever that game is. Or just an environment, common suppositions, and so on. Teachers and teaching are not in a pristine vacuum. If as a student or parent you know about some of those pressures, and you are not part of that scene, then you can tell a teacher up front, and possibly create different possibilities. Anyway, it's useful to know.

Thank you for your positive words, btw. smile

Quote
(Sometimes I have to type things out to be on my way to discovering what I believe about a thing! Thanks for helping me see what I really do think about this "classical piano as a sport" thing -- great assist!)


That - and exchanges - often help me in the same way.


Ah, gotcha; thanks for clarifying this for me.

I agree that there seem to be different environmental considerations from one place to another. And sometimes one can get so caught up in "the way we do things here" that it can be difficult to step outside the box and examine other practices, mindsets, etc.

There's a teacher in our local MTNA affiliate who moved from a fairly distant state a few years ago. She remarked on the differences between teaching piano and interacting with colleagues there vs. here.

There: independent teachers were paid way more; teachers were more collaborative than competitive with one another; etc.

Here: she had difficulty building her studio up, and had to drop her rates a lot. Clients didn't respect her work like in her former location. And so on.

Your comment about "umpteen teachers": that's a reality here, too, and could very well be the reason she finds such competition among teachers. We live in a relatively rural area, but there are a lot of us teachers, it seems to me, and the pool of students is obviously much smaller than in urban areas.

Knowing the culture in which one is teaching / learning isn't always easy to determine, though. Maybe it is easier for parents / students if they interview a lot of teachers and/or read teachers' websites (but more teachers than not do not have any website--at least around here). But teachers don't always know the philosophies of their colleagues, unless they're active in local independent teacher organizations or engage in other conversations with colleagues.

Oftentimes the main way you find out about what other teachers are doing is when you get transfer students. It is unfortunate that many of those students have developed problems from inadequate prior teaching. But I am straying farther from the topic now. smile

Summing up: I like this--

Quote
If as a student or parent you know about some of those pressures, and you are not part of that scene, then you can tell a teacher up front, and possibly create different possibilities.


Music to this teacher's ears when parents or older students communicate such things to me. I always ask in my initial phone interview if they have any concerns they'd like me to know about, and I emphasize openness of communication, especially in the trial month, as we start to build a program that will meet needs, address concerns, and get the new or transfer student started on the right foot.

Part of the joy and (mostly delightful) challenge of teaching. smile

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: BigIslandGuy] #2871685
07/23/19 02:10 AM
07/23/19 02:10 AM
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 709
Vancouver BC
T
The Monkeys Online content OP
500 Post Club Member
The Monkeys  Online Content OP
500 Post Club Member
T

Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 709
Vancouver BC
Originally Posted by BigIslandGuy
I'm just wondering when we'll hear about piano competitions that require anti-doping tests. JK.


"Wine, women and song"

A friend of mine owns a recording studio. According to him, drug use is widespread among musicians who are competing in the real world.

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: The Monkeys] #2871717
07/23/19 05:24 AM
07/23/19 05:24 AM
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Chopin Acolyte Online content
Full Member
Chopin Acolyte  Online Content
Full Member

Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
It's almost like the Vsauce of music, Adam Neely, stalked this thread a bit.



There you go, he said it. Music is not a sport laugh

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: The Monkeys] #2871764
07/23/19 07:43 AM
07/23/19 07:43 AM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,619
In the Ozarks of Missouri
NobleHouse Online content
2000 Post Club Member
NobleHouse  Online Content
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,619
In the Ozarks of Missouri
That was actually a very interesting video. Thanks for posting.


[Linked Image]
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: The Monkeys] #2871866
07/23/19 11:57 AM
07/23/19 11:57 AM
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Chopin Acolyte Online content
Full Member
Chopin Acolyte  Online Content
Full Member

Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Yeah, I like Adam Neely a lot, especially in his Vsauce-style videos when he talks about general aspects of music and performance, however, I can't get myself to like this "jazz" thing. I know it's a popular music style and should be ashamed for being limited to/only liking "classical harmonies", but especially his series "how not to suck at music" where he comments on people's compositions and reharmonization attempts, he always goes "that's interesting" even for pieces that aurally don't make any sense to me. It seems just like a bunch of more or less random chords bunched together, sometimes in a very disharmonic way (check out his video with Rick Beato, I think you can find it as "djazzpacito"). In classical music, even disharmonic things are usually used to build up a tension that's eventually released in a very elegant and clever way, in jazz it seems to be flowing with no apparent pattern...it never satisfies me as a listener and I have no clue what I should be looking for, when listening to that. I wish I had more love for jazz smirk

Last edited by Chopin Acolyte; 07/23/19 11:58 AM.
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: Chopin Acolyte] #2871878
07/23/19 12:51 PM
07/23/19 12:51 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
Originally Posted by Chopin Acolyte
It seems just like a bunch of more or less random chords bunched together, sometimes in a very disharmonic way (check out his video with Rick Beato, I think you can find it as "djazzpacito"). In classical music, even disharmonic things are usually used to build up a tension that's eventually released in a very elegant and clever way, in jazz it seems to be flowing with no apparent pattern...it never satisfies me as a listener and I have no clue what I should be looking for, when listening to that. I wish I had more love for jazz smirk

I never wish I have more love in genres that make little sense to me grin.

A lot of jazz just sounds like people borrowing existing tunes (usually classical ones) and turning them into......nonsense with a whole lot of added-note chords which make no sense and lead nowhere. These are often jazzers with not a lot of chops, so they 'compensate' by forcing all the wrong wrong-note chords into the notes of the melodies.

I remember one Christmas when I heard a jazzer's rubbishy version of Silent Night (where he sticks on all the wrong harmonies on every note of the tune, seemingly at random regardless of whether they fit or make sense), and I thought: Heck, I could improvise something similar on that tune and make it sound far more convincing, and much more like real jazz.......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: bennevis] #2871880
07/23/19 01:00 PM
07/23/19 01:00 PM
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Chopin Acolyte Online content
Full Member
Chopin Acolyte  Online Content
Full Member

Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Originally Posted by bennevis

I remember one Christmas when I heard a jazzer's rubbishy version of Silent Night (where he sticks on all the wrong harmonies on every note of the tune, seemingly at random regardless of whether they fit or make sense), and I thought: Heck, I could improvise something similar on that tune and make it sound far more convincing, and much more like real jazz.......


So what's real jazz then?

It's such a shame that all folks like Chopin are already dead and that kind of music is already written and there won't be any new to listen to smirk the only way is to move forward, explore new genres.

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: Chopin Acolyte] #2871883
07/23/19 01:11 PM
07/23/19 01:11 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,053
Originally Posted by Chopin Acolyte

So what's real jazz then?

This:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ9o6PPSL88


Quote
It's such a shame that all folks like Chopin are already dead and that kind of music is already written and there won't be any new to listen to smirk the only way is to move forward, explore new genres.

There's plenty of new piano music being composed, often in eclectic styles, even when using "old" forms.

For instance, this take on the venerable Polish dance popularized by Freddy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pak3U_f0H4o


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: bennevis] #2871942
07/23/19 03:12 PM
07/23/19 03:12 PM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,451
Finland
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
outo  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,451
Finland
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Chopin Acolyte

So what's real jazz then?

This:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ9o6PPSL88



Really? I have no words...

No offense to Mr. Hamelin though, going to hear him next week...

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: outo] #2871948
07/23/19 03:19 PM
07/23/19 03:19 PM
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Chopin Acolyte Online content
Full Member
Chopin Acolyte  Online Content
Full Member

Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 301
Tallahassee, FL
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Chopin Acolyte

So what's real jazz then?

This:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ9o6PPSL88



Really? I have no words...

No offense to Mr. Hamelin though, going to hear him next week...


Your reaction suggests there is something left to be desired about Gerschwin's songbook, or Hamelin's interpretation of the collection?

As for the collection: I'm familiar with Gerschwin and that he's is considered to be the pioneer of classical jazz, but I was referring more to the modern "let's play random dissonant chords" jazz. I like Gerschwin to some extent (of course nothing beats my ultimate classical favorite: Chopin, but that's a whole different style of music) ^_^ I just can't develop love for the modern jazz.

Re: Is classical piano a sport? [Re: Chopin Acolyte] #2871963
07/23/19 03:52 PM
07/23/19 03:52 PM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,451
Finland
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
outo  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,451
Finland
Originally Posted by Chopin Acolyte
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Chopin Acolyte

So what's real jazz then?

This:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ9o6PPSL88



Really? I have no words...

No offense to Mr. Hamelin though, going to hear him next week...


Your reaction suggests there is something left to be desired about Gerschwin's songbook, or Hamelin's interpretation of the collection?

Nope, it's just that real jazz to me is something completely different... I'll rather listen to some Monk or Taylor when on jazzy mood...

Page 4 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  Ken Knapp 

Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
PianoSupplies.com is Piano World's Online Store
Please visit our store today.
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Solfege anyone ?
by Serge88. 08/22/19 01:31 PM
Our Newsletter is Growing
by Piano World. 08/22/19 12:04 PM
The Search for My Tuning Customer
by Piano World. 08/22/19 11:10 AM
Dampp Chaser Samart Bar - under pads or over?
by jrcallan. 08/22/19 10:31 AM
What's Hot!!
Mason & Hamlin Piano Factory Tour!
-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics193,670
Posts2,861,481
Members94,222
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.1