Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
91 registered members (Amanda_S, barbaram, 5penguins, ando, brogh, Bill McKaig,RPT, aphexdisklavier, Catlady, amyram, 16 invisible), 8,030 guests, and 7 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 7 of 16 1 2 5 6 7 8 9 15 16
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: keystring] #2846771
05/09/19 11:58 AM
05/09/19 11:58 AM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Lostinidlewonder Offline OP
Full Member
Lostinidlewonder  Offline OP
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Originally Posted by keystring
I got lost in this part (or it got lost):

Originally Posted by Lostinidlewonder
Originally Posted by malkin


Alternatively, the teacher could provide simple and direct feedback regarding the performance or execution of the skills being taught. Keeping a focus on the skill allows the learner to maintain sense of personal worth.

Everyone, regardless of learning style or preference, needs to learn to accept feedback or criticism. Specific feedback sounds like "The notes in this phrase need to be connected. Do it like this." It does not sound like this "You suck."


Yeah I agree asking for feedback is very important however I don't necessarily see it as a needs to be alternative to getting to understand how a student thinks in terms of a perspective analysing their style of thinking.

Asking for feedback in itself can be done in many ways .................

Malkin wrote about a teacher giving feedback to a student, and also gave an example, "The notes in this phrase need to be connected. Do it like this." This also went to my point of positive (work toward something), vs. negative (this is wrong - don't do this wrong thing). I'm not sure that this point of mine was heard.

You the wrote about feedback. But what you wrote about was feedback that the teacher gets FROM the student. It is a different topic, different goals.

What do you think about the concept of giving a student concrete, doable feedback - guiding as to what to do - as opposed to telling a student what she did wrong and must not do? This was also my concept that I put forth.

Well I said that feedback can be done in many ways, this includes reversing the roles of who gives the feedback. It is a known technique to provoke feedback from your students to get them to think then reflect back what you think about that with a response to that with feedback of your own, this is to avoid it being simply a one way street. So I am not neglecting the comment at all but offering the ways in which it can occur from the students perspective also which is a critical point of this thread if one is to know how a student works as to build them up appropriately and not just teach over the top of their individuality.

As to your comment " What do you think about the concept of giving a student concrete, doable feedback - guiding as to what to do - as opposed to telling a student what she did wrong and must not do? This was also my concept that I put forth."

Throughout this entire thread I have described ways in which we present our lesson to our student, so you will not get me summarizing everything I said, you might want to read through everything I wrote. I may elaborate on correctives as such however:

When we are giving a lesson to a student and assessing their work we need to take care as to how we provide the students feedback and corrective measures to improve their knowledge/capability. I would like to briefly discuss a number of inappropriate examples that should be avoided thus perhaps you can gain insight into what to do.

- Negligent supporter:
Simply these teachers neglect to give students feedback and correctives. They are usually satisfied that they are able to explain subjects the first time and the students will absorb it all. After explaining or demonstrating they fail to check that the student has really understood the lesson. They do not allow much room if at all for questioning from the student during the lesson so there is little feedback and correctives being used.

- Negative contributor:
These kind of teachers provide a lot of feedback but it is always of the negative kind. They often say things like "students need to know where they make mistakes" and spend a great deal of time telling them what errors they have made. The subject matter they present is often too difficult for the student and/or their explanations and demonstrations are inadequate (eg: not communicate at the level of the students comprehension), and so they have to spend a great deal of time giving negative feedback.

- Dilatory grader:
These teachers are so slow in assessing and returning results to students that the results and comments are of little help as feedback. Routine work tasks are rarely assessed on time and the students have to wait for knowledge of results on their learning process. Feedback is always so late that the students are unable to take advantage of the information when it is provided .

- Feckless diagnostician and poor provider of correctives:
Unable to give appropriate correctives because of inadequate knowledge of the students learning problems. They do not attend to the details of the students responses and often fail to diagnose gaps in the students understanding of the subject matter. They are thus unable to provide the required correctives that will help students overcome their problems, or they are reluctant to modify their teaching methods so their corrective instruction can become effective.

[Feedback and Correctives from "Teaching Principles and Practice" Peter G. Cole + Lorna K.S Chan]


Last edited by Lostinidlewonder; 05/09/19 12:05 PM.

"The biggest risk in life is to take no risk at all"
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2846798
05/09/19 01:28 PM
05/09/19 01:28 PM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,281
Maine
P
PianoStudent88 Offline
4000 Post Club Member
PianoStudent88  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,281
Maine
I am a piano student, not a piano teacher. However I have other topics I teach occasionally and I am very interested in ideas about teaching.

LostinidleWonder, I found your description of entering into the point of view of your autistic student to be very moving.

I found your description of ways of thinking/processing to be useful to me, because I recognized a lot about myself in the description of an abstract thinker. It leads me to think about trying to escape my usual abstract filter in certain activities I do, and see what happens if I try to immerse myself in the sensation of the experience instead.


Piano Career Academy - Ilinca Vartic teaches the Russian school of piano playing
Musical-U - guidance for increasing musicality
Theta Music Trainer - fun ear training games
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2846806
05/09/19 02:00 PM
05/09/19 02:00 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 372
USA
A
Andamento Offline
Full Member
Andamento  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 372
USA
Originally Posted by Lostinidlewonder

Throughout this entire thread I have described...


Oh how I would love to insert a whole bunch more adjectives in front of the word "thread..."



Last edited by Andamento; 05/09/19 02:01 PM.
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2846810
05/09/19 02:19 PM
05/09/19 02:19 PM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,281
Maine
P
PianoStudent88 Offline
4000 Post Club Member
PianoStudent88  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,281
Maine
LostinidleWonder, I also want to thank you for posting the link to the PianoStreet thread Four Thinking Styles of Perception/Process where I have found a lot to reflect on, from many angles, about teaching and learning


Piano Career Academy - Ilinca Vartic teaches the Russian school of piano playing
Musical-U - guidance for increasing musicality
Theta Music Trainer - fun ear training games
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2846812
05/09/19 02:24 PM
05/09/19 02:24 PM
Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,300
Virginia, USA
T
TimR Offline
4000 Post Club Member
TimR  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
T

Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,300
Virginia, USA
Right turn, Clyde.

Teaching is a solitary activity. It is extremely rare to observe a teacher in the natural habitat.

How, then, can we know anything about what they do so badly?

We have evidence from people who accept transfer students with deficiencies that something went wrong. it isn't necessarily true that anything being discussed here was involved.


gotta go practice
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: TimR] #2846816
05/09/19 02:38 PM
05/09/19 02:38 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 372
USA
A
Andamento Offline
Full Member
Andamento  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 372
USA
Originally Posted by TimR
Right turn, Clyde.

Teaching is a solitary activity. It is extremely rare to observe a teacher in the natural habitat.

How, then, can we know anything about what they do so badly?

We have evidence from people who accept transfer students with deficiencies that something went wrong. it isn't necessarily true that anything being discussed here was involved.


I wonder if the OP is speaking from personal experience about the mistakes he himself made as a teacher, and what he's learned from them. If so, some transparency about that would be welcome.

Last edited by Andamento; 05/09/19 02:39 PM.
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Andamento] #2846828
05/09/19 03:53 PM
05/09/19 03:53 PM
Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,300
Virginia, USA
T
TimR Offline
4000 Post Club Member
TimR  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
T

Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,300
Virginia, USA
Originally Posted by Andamento
[quote=TimR]/quote]

I wonder if the OP is speaking from personal experience about the mistakes he himself made as a teacher, and what he's learned from them. If so, some transparency about that would be welcome.


Yeah, but could he possibly have made ALL those mistakes? In just 25 years of teaching? whistle

My impression from his previous posts is that he's probably a pretty decent teacher.

Last edited by TimR; 05/09/19 03:54 PM.

gotta go practice
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: TimR] #2846874
05/09/19 07:11 PM
05/09/19 07:11 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 372
USA
A
Andamento Offline
Full Member
Andamento  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 372
USA
Originally Posted by TimR
Originally Posted by Andamento
[quote=TimR]/quote]

I wonder if the OP is speaking from personal experience about the mistakes he himself made as a teacher, and what he's learned from them. If so, some transparency about that would be welcome.


Yeah, but could he possibly have made ALL those mistakes? In just 25 years of teaching? whistle


Probably not all of those mistakes. smile

And, yes, he may have heard some stories from transfer students about their previous teachers' approaches.

But what he himself has witnessed with his own eyes, either as the student or the teacher in the teacher-student relationship, would probably give him the most knowledge about what to do or not do as a teacher.

I think -- the OP can correct me if I'm wrong -- that analyzing his own teaching mistakes may have been more the thing that caused him to learn what he did, and become a better teacher for it. I say that because of his reaction to one of your posts. You said:

Quote
When I read LiW's opening sermon/monologue, I see the dictionary meaning of the words, but what I feel is a deeply personal impact to him, as if he were the one who's received some abusive instruction ala the Whiplash movie, and probably recently. Given what I know about his convoluted writing style, I have no idea how much was intended vs accidental, so I haven't responded much. I suspect some of the other posters here are reacting to it.


and he responded:

Quote
I love your imagination TimR :P


That response makes me question now whether he received bad or abusive instruction, or witnessed anyone else receiving such from another teacher. He seemed to be laughing at your response. (Your response, IMO, being a kind, thoughtful, compassionate one, acknowledging that there could be something deeply personal behind what he's writing here.)

I don't think he'd ridicule your post like that if he had been on the receiving end of damaging teaching.

He learned what he learned from somewhere, but despite everything he's written on this thread, it isn't clear how he's come to the conclusions he has.

All I know is that one's own experience can be a mighty fine teacher.

Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Andamento] #2846897
05/09/19 10:01 PM
05/09/19 10:01 PM
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 939
Niagara Falls NY
ebonykawai Offline
500 Post Club Member
ebonykawai  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 939
Niagara Falls NY
Originally Posted by Andamento
Originally Posted by Lostinidlewonder

Throughout this entire thread I have described...


Oh how I would love to insert a whole bunch more adjectives in front of the word "thread..."




I could say I am shocked that this thread is still going but I'm not, lol.


Lisa

Currently working on RCM 7 repertoire
Kawai UST-9, Yamaha CLP565GP, Kawai KDP110

"Sometimes I can only groan, and suffer, and pour out my despair at the piano!" - Frederic Chopin
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: ebonykawai] #2846900
05/09/19 10:40 PM
05/09/19 10:40 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 6,263
Tyrone Slothrop Offline
Tyrone Slothrop  Offline

6000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 6,263
Originally Posted by ebonykawai
I could say I am shocked that this thread is still going but I'm not, lol.

Only 346 posts to go to break the record set 10 years ago for longest thread in Piano Teachers Forum. What do you say? Shall we make a run for it?



across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2846909
05/09/19 11:40 PM
05/09/19 11:40 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,444
*sigh* Salt Lake City
malkin Offline
5000 Post Club Member
malkin  Offline
5000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,444
*sigh* Salt Lake City
If measured by words/post I'm sure this thread would already be a contender.


Learner
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2846915
05/10/19 12:03 AM
05/10/19 12:03 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,485
Finland
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
outo  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,485
Finland
I think posts like the OP are wasted on this forum where many (not all) teachers seem to come to vent their frustrations only or seek validation to their personal image as great teachers who know everything, have nothing to learn and who are forced to teach students that simply are too lazy, too stubborn or too stupid to learn...or have uncooperative parents...or whatever. The idea that there may be ways that might get better results with challenging students or that research in human fields could bring any useful new knowledge to teaching does not fit well with this kind of mindset.

On the other hand intelligent mature discussions is not what Internet forums are known for, so posting such essays will inevitably lead into trashing and cynicism.

Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: PianoStudent88] #2846918
05/10/19 12:30 AM
05/10/19 12:30 AM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Lostinidlewonder Offline OP
Full Member
Lostinidlewonder  Offline OP
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Originally Posted by Andamento
Originally Posted by Lostinidlewonder

Throughout this entire thread I have described...


Oh how I would love to insert a whole bunch more adjectives in front of the word "thread..."


What a useless contribution Andamento, this kind of kibitizing on the sidelines really highlights a bad attitude towards information sharing on pianoworld.

People who just complain and cry on the sidelines don't really make themselves look any better and their small group of friends who join in, really it a marginalized minority who are crying out loud, there are many more people seriously reading threads.

Originally Posted by TimR
Right turn, Clyde.

Teaching is a solitary activity. It is extremely rare to observe a teacher in the natural habitat.

How, then, can we know anything about what they do so badly?

We have evidence from people who accept transfer students with deficiencies that something went wrong. it isn't necessarily true that anything being discussed here was involved.

Are we are not to trust what our students tell us or when we read their journal and see the exact writing from their previous teacher does this not give us insight into their past?

Originally Posted by ebonykawai
Originally Posted by Andamento
Originally Posted by Lostinidlewonder

Throughout this entire thread I have described...


Oh how I would love to insert a whole bunch more adjectives in front of the word "thread..."




I could say I am shocked that this thread is still going but I'm not, lol.

There is a lot to discuss ignoring the irrelevant posts by a few loud people who are QQ everywhere because they don't know how to constructively contribute and add to useful knowledge, they just want to attempt to take away even though their efforts are rather puny.


Originally Posted by TimR
Originally Posted by Andamento
[quote=TimR]/quote]

I wonder if the OP is speaking from personal experience about the mistakes he himself made as a teacher, and what he's learned from them. If so, some transparency about that would be welcome.


Yeah, but could he possibly have made ALL those mistakes? In just 25 years of teaching? whistle

My impression from his previous posts is that he's probably a pretty decent teacher.

Well TimR I don't really need your "probable" thumbs up as much as I don't need your vehmented thumbs down. Just discuss the issues, contribute and add knowledge that is the purpose.

Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by ebonykawai
I could say I am shocked that this thread is still going but I'm not, lol.

Only 346 posts to go to break the record set 10 years ago for longest thread in Piano Teachers Forum. What do you say? Shall we make a run for it?

We? We certainly don't need irrelevant sideline kibitz from numberous unconstructive replies, that is a real shame and doesn't show that these few loud minorities are very sharing in knowledge but rather voicing marginalized judgement. If you think this kind of activity makes ones reputation here look any better I think you may need to reevaluate that type of contribution because it clearly isn't very useful to the majority of others. Continue if you have to it really makes no difference to me though I do appreciate the bumping up of my threads :P


"The biggest risk in life is to take no risk at all"
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: PianoStudent88] #2846919
05/10/19 12:33 AM
05/10/19 12:33 AM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Lostinidlewonder Offline OP
Full Member
Lostinidlewonder  Offline OP
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Originally Posted by PianoStudent88
I am a piano student, not a piano teacher. However I have other topics I teach occasionally and I am very interested in ideas about teaching.

LostinidleWonder, I found your description of entering into the point of view of your autistic student to be very moving.

I found your description of ways of thinking/processing to be useful to me, because I recognized a lot about myself in the description of an abstract thinker. It leads me to think about trying to escape my usual abstract filter in certain activities I do, and see what happens if I try to immerse myself in the sensation of the experience instead.

That is what is good about forums that we can share knowledge and help others grow as well as get various perspectives from others experiences. That particular autistic student I taught was among the lowest functioning student I had ever come across in all my teaching experience and will forever stick in my mind in a positive sense. She taught me such a great deal as I described in that post and I think those kind of students will forever mark your teaching soul and change you. Where others might find dificult students are mere failures and are not worthy of our teaching regieme, really we should be thinking if a student is failing it is our problem.

One valuable part of my teaching is to deal with problem cases, those who are not doing well. You often find if they fail at activities in piano terribly they also fail in other aspects of their education, as a teacher we really are often teaching tools that are greater than our subject sometimes. One issue that I am careful to assess is whether a student is being honest with themselves and with others, this to me is as problematic as dealing with autistic students but in a different manner, the building up of these students is just as difficult I feel and a long term procedure but it can be done.

A student being completely honest in terms of how much work they put into their piano every week is something I feel teachers can miss out on. Many younger kids like to tell me they practice every day but occasionally I don't believe it, they like to persuade me that they have given it a good effort for the week and some even in the past they have pretended to be not as skilled so they don't have to get through as much work! The level of dishonesty someone has with themselves really does effect a lot in their life.

I used to also tutor maths and science to high school students in my late teens and early 20s and first noticed this pattern of not being honest with oneself especially with those who were struggling with their marks. They like to make people believe they are studying hours every day but they are being so dishonest to themselves, so long they can get others to believe that they are trying it is good enough, they really don't ask themselves if they believe it sincerely. I would start saying to my students "You don't have to convince me! You need to be really honest with yourself it is your future not mine!" I was a bit harsh back then now I like to think I am a little more clever in trying to make them more disciplined beasts.

When I try and encourage my students who progress very slowly to be more honest with themselves I set a smaller amount of work for them, small enough that success should not require too much effort (sometimes I will lower my expectations considerably, the aim is to give them an amount they cannot fail with minimal daily effort though I do not tell them that!). We ensured in the lesson they knew exactly how to practice the passage (observed them practice in the lesson without any input from myself for that proof) then set them a challenge to do this practice routine every single day x amount of times (not minute/hour time but rather successful practice routines of what was set).

I highlight to these students that if practice is done correctly then the time required is very short, but if they practice bad then the time will increase. Some youngsters I will challenge them to play the phrase x times with no mistakes and if there is a mistake the count must go back to 0, this is one good technique they can use while practice alone to monitor their control.

When I started teaching piano I would set my expectations too high for all my students but this is not a good idea for those who struggle with daily practice and especially detrimental for those who are used to failure (eg: low grades at school). It is much more encouraging when they can gain confidence that they can complete tasks successfully on their own, so it becomes a duty of a teacher of these students to give small projects that they shouldn't fail.

How we increase the workload of these students over time needs to be done very carefully because demoralizing them with failure really has a roll on effect. If they fail it often makes them want to give up and then they regress in their motivation to practice on their own. I found that often these students are not really requiring to get better at the piano as such but better at their approach to studying something with discipline. This has an effect on their schooling and even their daily life. I have even asked some of my students to make their bed every day instead of expecting their mum to do it, it is a simple action to include into their daily habit and trains their discipline. I have even asked one student to do a single star jump every morning when they wake up lol. Something very simple that requires them to think about making a change in their daily habits can train their brains to remember to do a duty every day.

Piano thus has becomes a device to teach discipline rather than musical capability with some of my students and especially those who have problems being honest with themselves or severely lack confidence in themselves. Of course we improve their musicality and technical ability but the real lesson for them is to know they can be disciplined beasts and be honest about that!

I teach a whole range of students from all levels though the frustrations with being honest with ones self does tend to mostly surround beginners/intermediates (thought even advanced students can be fooling themselves in many ways, for example I've had a number of students who have finished all exam grade and yet are not honest with themselves in terms of their sight reading ability, they prefer to ignore it or make excuses why they can't or that they don't feel they even need to improve etc, though I see this putting up of barriers as not being honest with oneself!)

Even with my more advanced students I am still pushing them to work on their discipline but it is at a different level. They practice daily no problem but what about monitoring their goal setting, work ethic, motivation, vision for the future. Goal/dream setting, motivation etc is something that exists even in those who are competent pianists but most of them already know of it and it is the beginners who neglect it completely without honestly giving it a shot!


I don't necessarily have to see the effect of my teaching sometimes I don't have lessons with students long enough to see the long term effect I had with them. The good seeds (and unfortunately the bad ones, yes I remember the bad teachers I had and will never emulate them) of our teaching can have have the larger effect many years down the track. A number of years ago I got a message from one of my students I had taught almost 20 years ago when he was a 5 year old child. I rememberd him well and in our lessons we just wanted him to enjoy piano and find his love for it, he was talented but I always reminded him that the teacher can't make him better he has to do most of the work on his own and I will make sure he stays on track.

I remember the last piece we worked on was a pretty full on version of the Starwars Title theme which he was infatuated with, large chords for a young boy but he managed it all, when I caught up him again years later he played for me Liszt's Mephisto Waltz no 1 and Un Sospiro and Shubert famous Impromptu no3. Was so impressed with his progress and sound, but was very flattered he said it was the love for piano that I taught him at the start that fueled his desire to go further and further. Sometimes we are not meant to see the full effect we have on our students, but some of them remember it even if we don't or didn't even realize it! Come to think of it there are many teachers I adore from my past who have no idea how much they actually helped me in my life even today. All of these teachers made me love knowledge and learning, they always built me up never tore me down, empowered me, had confidence in me.


I don't think people can be naturally disciplined 100% every 7 days a week. There are certainly days of inspiration where we want to do nothing else but work, then there are days were we feel like crap and just want to do nothing, we are human after all with emotions not robots. I think most is learned while you are younger, it is just a lot easier if a child is brought up with concept of discipline, not doing things only when you feel like it and accept sometimes work is not so convenient. An old dog can still learn new tricks and even adults who live a chaotic life can impose some kind of discipline in their life and then once they honestly meet with it it can make a lot of changes not only in piano but other areas of life.

Sometimes on days were I feel so unmotivated to physically play the piano I will work on other things which doesn't require me to play, such as exploring repertoire, organising my work space etc etc. So long it has something to do with my music. Sometimes just watching a movie about music, or going to art gallery, watching the symphony orchestra live, going to watch some buskers etc, all of this renews my motivational energy to do music.

Piano can be such a solitary pastime, it is actually nice to join in with groups of people who like music, meet occasionally and be a part of a community. This I have found inspired me a huge amount to learn more doing music outside of the work space (teaching and my own study) when you have a community to connect with. There are networking websites (such as https://www.meetup.com) which encourage people to meet up with others in person which I found awesome too.


Originally Posted by PianoStudent88
LostinidleWonder, I also want to thank you for posting the link to the PianoStreet thread Four Thinking Styles of Perception/Process where I have found a lot to reflect on, from many angles, about teaching and learning

I found it insightful also when I first came across it also! I think it gives us more insight into the workings of thought and gives us some tools that can help on our way to analyze the way our students work.


"The biggest risk in life is to take no risk at all"
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: outo] #2846920
05/10/19 12:39 AM
05/10/19 12:39 AM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Lostinidlewonder Offline OP
Full Member
Lostinidlewonder  Offline OP
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Originally Posted by outo
I think posts like the OP are wasted on this forum where many (not all) teachers seem to come to vent their frustrations only or seek validation to their personal image as great teachers who know everything, have nothing to learn and who are forced to teach students that simply are too lazy, too stubborn or too stupid to learn...or have uncooperative parents...or whatever. The idea that there may be ways that might get better results with challenging students or that research in human fields could bring any useful new knowledge to teaching does not fit well with this kind of mindset.

On the other hand intelligent mature discussions is not what Internet forums are known for, so posting such essays will inevitably lead into trashing and cynicism.

You have a point, the internet is like that, a minority talk very loud and band together and feel as if they are a part of a greater majority. The reality is that these people who complain on the sidelines and try to tear down knowledge are merely a marginalized few. There are a much higher % of people who do not comment on threads at all and just read, these are the people that I also am writing for since it is the majority of our audience. There are those who want to take time to read through a lot of information and learn from it or compare it to the way in which they do things themselves. That is why I write a lot so that people who do not comment in these threads perhaps have most of their queries answered. I've been on the internet far too long to allow peoples attempts at bullying hurt me at all, it is quite funny when it is dished out at me but a waste of time. It is also sad that these kind of people actually make others not want to contribute because they could not manage the bullying, I am sure people here know those that they are driven out, unfortunately for them they will not have the same effect on me :P So bring it! :P


"The biggest risk in life is to take no risk at all"
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: malkin] #2846921
05/10/19 12:41 AM
05/10/19 12:41 AM
Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Lostinidlewonder Offline OP
Full Member
Lostinidlewonder  Offline OP
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2008
Posts: 184
West Australia
Originally Posted by malkin
If measured by words/post I'm sure this thread would already be a contender.

Have a look at my responses on pianostreet you might like to see I have done some 15 years of mostly long posts :P Wow I must have written more than anyone one else in the history of the internet!!!!! lol.

Last edited by Lostinidlewonder; 05/10/19 12:41 AM.

"The biggest risk in life is to take no risk at all"
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: outo] #2846994
05/10/19 09:16 AM
05/10/19 09:16 AM
Joined: Mar 2018
Posts: 332
Texas
Dr. Rogers Offline
Full Member
Dr. Rogers  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Mar 2018
Posts: 332
Texas
Moderators, would it be possible to get a forum ONLY for piano teachers, with some sort of validation process?


Austin Rogers, PhD
Music Teacher in Austin, TX
Baldwin SD-10 Concert Grand "Kuroneko", Baldwin Upright, Yamaha P-255
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2847001
05/10/19 09:45 AM
05/10/19 09:45 AM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,954
Boynton Beach, FL
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Morodiene  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,954
Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by ebonykawai
I could say I am shocked that this thread is still going but I'm not, lol.

Only 346 posts to go to break the record set 10 years ago for longest thread in Piano Teachers Forum. What do you say? Shall we make a run for it?


I'm game! I'm sure we can find a way to further degrade this thread. laugh


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image][Linked Image][Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: malkin] #2847002
05/10/19 09:46 AM
05/10/19 09:46 AM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,954
Boynton Beach, FL
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Morodiene  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,954
Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted by malkin
If measured by words/post I'm sure this thread would already be a contender.

LOL, you never fail to disappoint, malkin. smile


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image][Linked Image][Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: Always build up, never break down. [Re: Lostinidlewonder] #2847003
05/10/19 09:52 AM
05/10/19 09:52 AM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,954
Boynton Beach, FL
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Morodiene  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,954
Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted by Lostinidlewonder
Originally Posted by PianoStudent88
I am a piano student, not a piano teacher. However I have other topics I teach occasionally and I am very interested in ideas about teaching.

LostinidleWonder, I found your description of entering into the point of view of your autistic student to be very moving.

I found your description of ways of thinking/processing to be useful to me, because I recognized a lot about myself in the description of an abstract thinker. It leads me to think about trying to escape my usual abstract filter in certain activities I do, and see what happens if I try to immerse myself in the sensation of the experience instead.

That is what is good about forums that we can share knowledge and help others grow as well as get various perspectives from others experiences.[...]

Seriously, it's fine if you want to write such long posts, but there is a common thing called "TL;DR" - too long, didn't read - where you summarize in a few short sentences for those who don't wish to wade through everything. Having this is respectful of people's time and attention spans. Just a suggestion.


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image][Linked Image][Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Page 7 of 16 1 2 5 6 7 8 9 15 16

Moderated by  Ken Knapp 

Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
PianoSupplies.com is Piano World's Online Store
Please visit our store today.
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Fustrated with sheet music
by duanef. 09/20/19 07:48 AM
Casio Ap-270 vs Ap-470: advices?
by Amanda_S. 09/20/19 07:24 AM
Rehamonization into Different Genres
by BB666. 09/20/19 04:52 AM
Bella Ciao (La Casa de Papel) Piano Cover
by ppxrare. 09/20/19 04:00 AM
What's Hot!!
Our August Newsletter is Out!
------------------
Mason & Hamlin Piano Factory Tour!

-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics194,117
Posts2,871,259
Members94,458
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.1