Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
126 registered members (Bill McKaig,RPT, amyram, Ankee, 36251, astrotoy, 34 invisible), 2,135 guests, and 7 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
How to develop a high level of precision #2845180
05/04/19 05:12 PM
05/04/19 05:12 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 63
Colorado
O
One Ohm Offline OP
Full Member
One Ohm  Offline OP
Full Member
O

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 63
Colorado
I was recently watching the video of Boris Giltburg performing Rachmaninov's 10 Preludes Op. 23. I'm learning No.4 in D major and was looking for interpretation examples. Anyway, I was amazed at the level of precision Boris had during this concert. I have not listened to all of it yet, but have not noticed a single mistake (i.e., wrong note, or missed note) during the performance so far. Given this is a live recording, I am extremely impressed. How does a pianist develop such a high level of precision in their playing, especially for a live recital? Unless...somehow they have edited the audio for the video, but I highly doubt it. I feel fortunate to play through a single piece perfectly, but I am not convinced I could do that for 10 pieces in a row. These are difficult pieces! I'm amazed!

Boris Giltburg performs Rachmaninov: 10 Preludes Op. 23 (Queen Elizabeth Hall recital)

Piano & Music Gifts & Accessories (570)
Piano accessories and music gift items, digital piano dolly, music theme party goods
Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845185
05/04/19 05:24 PM
05/04/19 05:24 PM
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 141
V
Vilhelm Moqvist Online content
Full Member
Vilhelm Moqvist  Online Content
Full Member
V

Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 141
Hours upon hours of slow practice. It isn't more complicated than that.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845188
05/04/19 05:40 PM
05/04/19 05:40 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 63
Colorado
O
One Ohm Offline OP
Full Member
One Ohm  Offline OP
Full Member
O

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 63
Colorado
Surely there is more to it than that. I have spent hours and hours of slow, deliberate practice on pieces. However, on more advanced pieces that ultimately require both precision and speed, there is a point where finding the right mechanics for the body/wrists/hands becomes more important. This discovery only happens as the tempo increases. I'm not convinced that being able to play something perfectly at a slow speed, for hours and hours, equates to precision at recital time and tempo. However, maybe I am wrong and it can be boiled down to a simple one-liner?

Last edited by One Ohm; 05/04/19 05:40 PM.
Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845264
05/04/19 10:05 PM
05/04/19 10:05 PM
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 627
Z
Zaphod Offline
500 Post Club Member
Zaphod  Offline
500 Post Club Member
Z

Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 627
I usually find it's not quite as simple as play it slow then work up to playing it fast. Sometimes I start slow, then try and roughly speed it up to get the idea of any anomalies or particular ideas about playing it faster, then slow it down again and use those ideas.

Sometimes fast, sometimes slow. Macro vs micro.

I don't start working on the really slow micro work until I can roughly bash the whole piece through albeit at a slower tempo. Then I sometimes try and play the whole piece through faster to revise the landscape of wheat needs working on.

You may want to start on an idea I saw Josh Wright talking about which is to play slow through to fast every day. This is what I do. 60 - 80 - 100 - 120 - 140 then next day 60 - 80 etc. then eventually 70 - 90 - 110 - 130 - you get the picture. So not "Hours and hours" of slow practise. Try this way instead and see how you get on.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Zaphod] #2845329
05/05/19 05:02 AM
05/05/19 05:02 AM
Joined: Apr 2019
Posts: 175
Hawai'i Island
B
BigIslandGuy Offline
Full Member
BigIslandGuy  Offline
Full Member
B

Joined: Apr 2019
Posts: 175
Hawai'i Island
Originally Posted by Zaphod

You may want to start on an idea I saw Josh Wright talking about which is to play slow through to fast every day. This is what I do. 60 - 80 - 100 - 120 - 140 then next day 60 - 80 etc. then eventually 70 - 90 - 110 - 130 - you get the picture. So not "Hours and hours" of slow practise. Try this way instead and see how you get on.

This is exactly what I do. It requires a certain amount of discipline to make oneself stick with the program, but if you can, you'll systematically root out the problem areas.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845355
05/05/19 08:13 AM
05/05/19 08:13 AM
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 141
V
Vilhelm Moqvist Online content
Full Member
Vilhelm Moqvist  Online Content
Full Member
V

Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 141
Originally Posted by One Ohm
Surely there is more to it than that. I have spent hours and hours of slow, deliberate practice on pieces. However, on more advanced pieces that ultimately require both precision and speed, there is a point where finding the right mechanics for the body/wrists/hands becomes more important. This discovery only happens as the tempo increases. I'm not convinced that being able to play something perfectly at a slow speed, for hours and hours, equates to precision at recital time and tempo. However, maybe I am wrong and it can be boiled down to a simple one-liner?


Well yes, you're right. You do need to find the right mechanics and you will need to increase tempo to be able to do that. But that doesn't mean that you should practice at full speed all the time. As Zaphod said, try playing the piece very slowly and gradually increase the tempo. When I said slow practice I didn't mean that you should always practice slowly. But to be able to increase the tempo you will need to learn the piece at a slow tempo first.

How well you play during recitals does also depend on how nervous you get. Sometimes when playing in concert I hit wrong notes that I would never do at home so to avoid that I usually play my pieces at a slightly higher tempo when I am at home so I have some margin during the concert. Keep in mind that everyone has different practice routines though. Try out some different routines and see what suits you best!

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845450
05/05/19 01:14 PM
05/05/19 01:14 PM
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 189
R
RubberFingers Offline
Full Member
RubberFingers  Offline
Full Member
R

Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 189
I find things get sloppy and uneven if I play fast too much. So I try playing slowly, staccato most of the time, but intersperse it with fast which is a different muscle memory (or just plain memory -- slow can be sight reading). Sometimes slow fingering doesn't work going fast.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845802
05/06/19 02:57 PM
05/06/19 02:57 PM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,259
Moscow, Russia
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Iaroslav Vasiliev  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
I

Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,259
Moscow, Russia
Some pedagogues think that the level of precision is an innate trait. I think it's probably connected with the ability to concentrate attention for prolonged periods of time.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2845814
05/06/19 03:29 PM
05/06/19 03:29 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 63
Colorado
O
One Ohm Offline OP
Full Member
One Ohm  Offline OP
Full Member
O

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 63
Colorado
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Some pedagogues think that the level of precision is an innate trait. I think it's probably connected with the ability to concentrate attention for prolonged periods of time.


I can accept that. It is a very impressive gift, imho.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2845826
05/06/19 04:02 PM
05/06/19 04:02 PM
Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 194
R
R111 Online content
Full Member
R111  Online Content
Full Member
R

Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 194
Originally Posted by One Ohm
I was recently watching the video of Boris Giltburg performing Rachmaninov's 10 Preludes Op. 23. I'm learning No.4 in D major and was looking for interpretation examples. Anyway, I was amazed at the level of precision Boris had during this concert. I have not listened to all of it yet, but have not noticed a single mistake (i.e., wrong note, or missed note) during the performance so far. Given this is a live recording, I am extremely impressed. How does a pianist develop such a high level of precision in their playing, especially for a live recital? Unless...somehow they have edited the audio for the video, but I highly doubt it. I feel fortunate to play through a single piece perfectly, but I am not convinced I could do that for 10 pieces in a row. These are difficult pieces! I'm amazed!

Boris Giltburg performs Rachmaninov: 10 Preludes Op. 23 (Queen Elizabeth Hall recital)

Nobody seems to ask how professional singers don't sing the wrong note sometimes. It's the same way with piano. You have to make the keyboard an extension of your voice, without looking.

It takes a lot of practice to get to this level, and I am certainly not there yet. I'm a much better singer. It's just that most of us have been practicing with our voice all our lives, so we don't fully appreciate how much time our brain has had to adapt to the instrument.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: R111] #2845979
05/07/19 05:24 AM
05/07/19 05:24 AM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,259
Moscow, Russia
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Iaroslav Vasiliev  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
I

Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,259
Moscow, Russia
Originally Posted by R111
Nobody seems to ask how professional singers don't sing the wrong note sometimes.

They do. And the faster the tempo is and the bigger the intervals are, the bigger the chance of a mistake is, just like it is on the piano.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2846226
05/07/19 08:23 PM
05/07/19 08:23 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,020
In the Ozarks of Missouri
NobleHouse Offline
3000 Post Club Member
NobleHouse  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,020
In the Ozarks of Missouri
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by R111
Nobody seems to ask how professional singers don't sing the wrong note sometimes.

They do. And the faster the tempo is and the bigger the intervals are, the bigger the chance of a mistake is, just like it is on the piano.


Professional singers do have off nights. Singing sharp or flat, it happens to even the best of singers. Or even sometimes even their voice will crack on certain notes.


[Linked Image]
Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Vilhelm Moqvist] #2846853
05/09/19 05:28 PM
05/09/19 05:28 PM
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 184
Suffolk, UK
S
Scordatura Offline
Full Member
Scordatura  Offline
Full Member
S

Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 184
Suffolk, UK
Originally Posted by Vilhelm Moqvist
Hours upon hours of slow practice. It isn't more complicated than that.

Hours and hours of slow practice is a necessary condition for developing accuracy, but not a sufficient condition!
It is way, way more complicated than that, and if you believe otherwise, you're missing out the vital ingredient, plain and simple.

To get an idea of what that ingredient is, you might like to try doing the following easy - if somewhat peculiar - actions::
1. Take a stool or light chair, invert it and place it on the floor on some precise spot of your choice.
2. Pick up an ordinary size book in one hand; pass it over the top of your head and transfer it to your other hand; then rest the book on a table, overhanging the edge just enough to prevent it from falling off.
3.On a piece of paper, write you first name with the letters inverted.

Doubtless you found no difficulty in performing any of these actions accurately - without ever having practised them at all. What did you need to do to accomplish these feats?

The answer, obviously, is that you imagined the end result, or effect, or happening you intended to bring about. What's more, you'd be able to imagine these without needing to perform the actions.

The bottom line is that accuracy in piano-playing is dependent upon having, in advance of striking the keys, a precise intention in your mind as to each of the successive sounds you wish to experience coming from the instrument. The more accurately you can imagine each sound, and exactly when you wish to hear it, the quicker you'll be able to develop accuracy when practising. How does one improve ones ability to accurately imagine a sound? Simple - by listening attentively to its quality, and forming a memory of it.

Hoping this will help the OP!


Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. - Albert Einstein

https://understanding-piano-technique.com/ocportal
Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2846904
05/09/19 11:15 PM
05/09/19 11:15 PM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,573
Finland
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
outo  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,573
Finland

Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Some pedagogues think that the level of precision is an innate trait. I think it's probably connected with the ability to concentrate attention for prolonged periods of time.

That is what I think as well.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2846907
05/09/19 11:34 PM
05/09/19 11:34 PM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,573
Finland
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
outo  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,573
Finland
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by R111
Nobody seems to ask how professional singers don't sing the wrong note sometimes.

They do. And the faster the tempo is and the bigger the intervals are, the bigger the chance of a mistake is, just like it is on the piano.

True, but I'd say singing is still less prone to random mistakes physically. There's no extra interaction with a "machine". It also feels less complex, since you only sing one note at the time. I can sing much easier than play with much less practice. Actially I need no practice to hit the right notes on familiar pieces, only the voice may be rough. Another thing to note is that you can adjust your voice during a note which you cannot do at the piano. After the hammer hits the key there's little one can do.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: Scordatura] #2846937
05/10/19 04:42 AM
05/10/19 04:42 AM
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 141
V
Vilhelm Moqvist Online content
Full Member
Vilhelm Moqvist  Online Content
Full Member
V

Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 141
Originally Posted by Scordatura
Originally Posted by Vilhelm Moqvist
Hours upon hours of slow practice. It isn't more complicated than that.

Hours and hours of slow practice is a necessary condition for developing accuracy, but not a sufficient condition!
It is way, way more complicated than that, and if you believe otherwise, you're missing out the vital ingredient, plain and simple.

To get an idea of what that ingredient is, you might like to try doing the following easy - if somewhat peculiar - actions::
1. Take a stool or light chair, invert it and place it on the floor on some precise spot of your choice.
2. Pick up an ordinary size book in one hand; pass it over the top of your head and transfer it to your other hand; then rest the book on a table, overhanging the edge just enough to prevent it from falling off.
3.On a piece of paper, write you first name with the letters inverted.

Doubtless you found no difficulty in performing any of these actions accurately - without ever having practised them at all. What did you need to do to accomplish these feats?

The answer, obviously, is that you imagined the end result, or effect, or happening you intended to bring about. What's more, you'd be able to imagine these without needing to perform the actions.

The bottom line is that accuracy in piano-playing is dependent upon having, in advance of striking the keys, a precise intention in your mind as to each of the successive sounds you wish to experience coming from the instrument. The more accurately you can imagine each sound, and exactly when you wish to hear it, the quicker you'll be able to develop accuracy when practising. How does one improve ones ability to accurately imagine a sound? Simple - by listening attentively to its quality, and forming a memory of it.

Hoping this will help the OP!


You are right, I was oversimplifying it quite a bit. There are so many different ways to practice a piece, but for me the fundamental part of learning a piece is to practice it slowly. What you want to do with your practice is your own choice but to practice slowly is ALWAYS necessary.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2848111
05/14/19 02:59 PM
05/14/19 02:59 PM
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 247
Connecticut, USA
MichaelJK Offline

Full Member
MichaelJK  Offline

Full Member

Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 247
Connecticut, USA
Precision is actually extremely simple: you just need to identify whatever factors are getting in the way of imprecision, and take steps to ensure they don't happen.

I don't think you can make it any more specific than that. You need to understand where you want to go, and what's stopping you from getting there. This can be different for everyone.

Some factors that could be interfering:

- Lack of concentration
- Incorrect concept of piano technique
- Confusion about how the piece goes
- Impatience

Those are just 4 broad categories, but there could be thousands. To me, this is what makes practicing fun. I get to investigate these one-by-one, and learn about myself.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: One Ohm] #2848479
05/15/19 02:24 PM
05/15/19 02:24 PM
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 135
Chicago, IL, USA
T
TwelfthRoot2 Offline
Full Member
TwelfthRoot2  Offline
Full Member
T

Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 135
Chicago, IL, USA
I'll add another small detail, but something that I think is easy to miss or not notice:

Have an idea of where you want your fingers/hands to go BEFORE moving them, and you must commit strongly in your mind to the goal position. The opposite of what I'm talking about is a situation where you're moving your hands or fingers without having a strong sense of commitment and HOPING you hit the right key. Hitting the right key without doing it confidently is no better than hitting the wrong key in my opinion because it's not something that you can build off of and improve on. When you commit strongly to the position then you get a better feedback with mistakes and this in turn will help you correct the mistakes quickly and improve quite a bit. For the people that do this subconsciously it won't matter; for those that do it consciously it may seem extremely obvious; and for those that don't do it at all it can be performance (life?) changing. I'm starting to wonder if this is one of the biggest differences between people who don't improve much (and are still relative beginners) and those that have jumped to the next levels.

Furthermore, I think this central idea is basically what lies behind the idea that practicing something far above your current level is detriment to progress. The reason being, that when we practice something at our level or below, we can feel comfortable and dominate the accuracy to really lock it into our fingers and more importantly, our mental image of the piano (not that playing at your level guarantees you anything if you don't practice properly). This same concept can be applied to pieces well-above our level, but then there are other problems like wrist motion and/or tension, etc. that can stall progress.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: TwelfthRoot2] #2848495
05/15/19 03:14 PM
05/15/19 03:14 PM
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 247
Connecticut, USA
MichaelJK Offline

Full Member
MichaelJK  Offline

Full Member

Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 247
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted by TwelfthRoot2
I'll add another small detail, but something that I think is easy to miss or not notice:

Have an idea of where you want your fingers/hands to go BEFORE moving them, and you must commit strongly in your mind to the goal position. The opposite of what I'm talking about is a situation where you're moving your hands or fingers without having a strong sense of commitment and HOPING you hit the right key. Hitting the right key without doing it confidently is no better than hitting the wrong key in my opinion because it's not something that you can build off of and improve on. When you commit strongly to the position then you get a better feedback with mistakes and this in turn will help you correct the mistakes quickly and improve quite a bit. For the people that do this subconsciously it won't matter; for those that do it consciously it may seem extremely obvious; and for those that don't do it at all it can be performance (life?) changing. I'm starting to wonder if this is one of the biggest differences between people who don't improve much (and are still relative beginners) and those that have jumped to the next levels.

Furthermore, I think this central idea is basically what lies behind the idea that practicing something far above your current level is detriment to progress. The reason being, that when we practice something at our level or below, we can feel comfortable and dominate the accuracy to really lock it into our fingers and more importantly, our mental image of the piano (not that playing at your level guarantees you anything if you don't practice properly). This same concept can be applied to pieces well-above our level, but then there are other problems like wrist motion and/or tension, etc. that can stall progress.


If you want to jump to an even higher level, consider this: "Committing strongly in your mind to the goal position" does not have to refer only to the keys on the keyboard. The "goal position" can also be a mental state, or a particular "way of moving", or an "attitude". Or, it can be a rhythm, phrasing, dynamic, etc. Most of those elements are generally more important than hitting the right notes, and you can absolutely confidently nail them, even if you're playing wrong notes, which absolutely does give you something to build off of and improve on, as you say.

So, practicing something far above your current level does not in any way have to be a detriment to progress. It's only a detriment if you play it without confidence. That's the tricky part, because we're taught in this culture that if you suck, you need to apologize about it, and thus we learn the insane, erroneous notion that confidence and competence must somehow be linked.

Re: How to develop a high level of precision [Re: TwelfthRoot2] #2848506
05/15/19 04:00 PM
05/15/19 04:00 PM
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 363
Alabama
A
anamnesis Offline
Full Member
anamnesis  Offline
Full Member
A

Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 363
Alabama
Originally Posted by TwelfthRoot2
I'll add another small detail, but something that I think is easy to miss or not notice:

Have an idea of where you want your fingers/hands to go BEFORE moving them, and you must commit strongly in your mind to the goal position. The opposite of what I'm talking about is a situation where you're moving your hands or fingers without having a strong sense of commitment and HOPING you hit the right key. Hitting the right key without doing it confidently is no better than hitting the wrong key in my opinion because it's not something that you can build off of and improve on. When you commit strongly to the position then you get a better feedback with mistakes and this in turn will help you correct the mistakes quickly and improve quite a bit. For the people that do this subconsciously it won't matter; for those that do it consciously it may seem extremely obvious; and for those that don't do it at all it can be performance (life?) changing. I'm starting to wonder if this is one of the biggest differences between people who don't improve much (and are still relative beginners) and those that have jumped to the next levels.


This can be applied more practically with the ability to diagnose and troubleshoot if you understand the ballistic nature of piano playing and the required timing and the role of direction/aiming.

You're supposed to explicitly aim for every single articulation without "carrying yourself there" (throwing/aiming a basketball into the hoop versus walking across the court and climbing a ladder to put it into the hoop).

People have a easier time doing this somewhat intuitively for larger leaps, but this concept confounds them the more "adjacent/near" the articulations are to each other*, but once you get it and do it consistently for all situations and piano textures, all distances will seem to "even out".

*(The reason for this being that people only intuitively understand motion in the sagittal plane. What happens in the frontal/transverse planes is not nearly as intuitive. If you study most writings on piano technique, published or more informal, obsession with sagittal plane motion over the other two becomes pretty overt, to the point that you almost wouldn't realize that they exist, despite the fact that most of our effort actually involves those other two planes in order to even setup sagittal plane motion properly.)

Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
PianoSupplies.com is Piano World's Online Store
Please visit our store today.
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Are you lonesome playing the piano?
by WeakLeftHand. 10/20/19 12:15 PM
MP11SE - Headphone Jack Unbalanced Sound
by _offbeat. 10/20/19 12:07 PM
Mysterious piano age
by Ekoret. 10/20/19 11:36 AM
K300 ATX3
by Gary001. 10/20/19 08:46 AM
What's Hot!!
Our August Newsletter is Out!
------------------
Mason & Hamlin Piano Factory Tour!

-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics194,625
Posts2,881,216
Members94,720
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.1