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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Nadia] #2844138
05/01/19 11:25 AM
05/01/19 11:25 AM
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Hanon addresses the issue of varying key response from heavy to lighter across the most played range of the piano. Also the changes in hand position across the keyboard and coordinating play in both hands while doing identical things.

There is value in "throw-away" exercise warmup--you're not ingraining initially bad playing, due to not having played that day, into the piano pieces that you are trying to ultimately play well in the "perfect practice makes perfect" sense.

It's better to murder Czerny in private so that Beethoven goes well in public.



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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: fatar760] #2844193
05/01/19 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by fatar760

If we practise without being musical then this is how we play.


Musicality has only a sense when it relates to a piece of music that has an expressive content. An exercice is not robotic nor musical in itself. It has a purpose which to is develop a particular ability, that can be speed, eveness, finger dexterity, but also touch control or any other specific skill. Therefore I do not see where is the debate. Anyway all virtuoso pianists have spent numerous hours to do drilling to acquire the mechanical dexterity necessary to play difficult pieces. And it is not to say that one should not also play pieces and learn to play musically.

Learning to play evenly a scale is not robotic nor musical, but once this exact same scale is part of a Mozart sonata and is played exactly the same way, it becomes musical by the context in which it is played. Learning to play musically is a complex process that involves multiple skills, phrasing, understanding the composers style and intentions, interpretative choices, technical abilities, ... some other skills i did not mention and a touch of artistic genius.

And I do not think any student seats at the piano day after day with the only purpose to drill notes without any goal ? I have a hard time to even understand wat is the subject of the discussion.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: bennevis] #2844218
05/01/19 03:16 PM
05/01/19 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by bennevis
Pieces should be practiced (and sight-read) musically, always. Drills & exercises are just that - drills, exercises to develop technique (so that it can all be forgotten when practising pieces), nothing more.

I can't agree with that. There is no technique by itself. Technique exists only in the context of music, being the way to create music. If someone 'drills' notes robotically without any musical goal that's what he will learn to do. Only the musical goal creates technique as the means to achieve it.


You harping on the same thing in several threads.

In which case, I suggest you read the blogs of some very well-known pianists (who are certainly not 'mere mechanicus') and read about what someone once observed of Richter practicing.........

Is Richter's playing mechanical?

(Is Federer's playing mechanical - or artistic?)

I'm not sure what you're talking about. Richter described his practice methods quite clearly. IIRC I already summarized it once on these forums. For fast and technically demanding things he mainly focused on slow playing and considered it a staple of technical development. He said that the main goal of playing slowly was to remember the motions. He also said that the most important things in slow playing are 'to set the hands free' and concentrate on physical sensations, trying to achieve pleasant physical sensations when playing. When he was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2844234
05/01/19 04:26 PM
05/01/19 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
[...]When [Richter] was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.


But he wasn't taking about Hanon, was he? That's what this thread is about, I believe, and the virtue or not of mechanical exercises used to develop technique.

Regards,


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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Nadia] #2844245
05/01/19 05:20 PM
05/01/19 05:20 PM
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God there's so many things I disagree with in the last few posts:

Playing scales with musical shape is important and shouldn't be a robotic exercise.

Playing musical does not necessary mean changing tempo

If a singer is worried about their breath control then they're not very good singers. I actively encourage all my singing students to forget about their breath and put their focus on song context and, where required, ensuring the correct ligaments are being used to create the necessary and appropriate sounds required.

Also, time is short. Practise time is even shorter. Why waste it on robotic, mindless exercises/drills, when we could be making music? To compare a pianist to a tennis player is a crazy comparison and the sort of mind-set that Hanon encourages. Different muscles. Different SUPPORT from the rest of the body. Different workload.

Finally - do students sit for hours and hours doing drills? Yes, yes they do. I've heard many. I've heard many develop injuries through hours of mindless drills at top institutes in London (RAM and Trinity). That mind-set is largely discouraged in the UK these days.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: fatar760] #2844251
05/01/19 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by fatar760
God there's so many things I disagree with in the last few posts:

Same here - I disagree with you on almost every point.

But I'll grant you that you completely misunderstood some important factors in the above arguments.


Quote
Playing musical does not necessary mean changing tempo

Have a listen to any great pianist playing lots of scales & arpeggios in K545.

Can you set a metronome to any of them? Go on, try it.

BTW, I don't mean changing tempo as in abrupt tempo change. I don't even mean rubato.

I mean 'breathing', something akin to what singers would do if they could take breaths without breaking the line.
Quote
If a singer is worried about their breath control then they're not very good singers. I actively encourage all my singing students to forget about their breath and put their focus on song context and, where required, ensuring the correct ligaments are being used to create the necessary and appropriate sounds required.

Ligaments?? smirk

Are you sure you don't mean muscles?

Aren't you forgetting something very important - something I know very well, having treated many singers myself? That their musical instrument is part of their body, in fact, part of their respiratory system?

Quote
Also, time is short. Practise time is even shorter. Why waste it on robotic, mindless exercises/drills, when we could be making music? To compare a pianist to a tennis player is a crazy comparison and the sort of mind-set that Hanon encourages. Different muscles. Different SUPPORT from the rest of the body. Different workload.

Tennis players practise drills so that every movement becomes instinctive - including footwork - so that they don't have to think about specific movements when playing, and instead concentrate on getting to, and hitting the ball.

A pianist practises exercises so that every movement - whether in scaler passages or some other common pianistic pattern of passagework - becomes instinctive, so that they don't have to consciously think about each individual movement of fingers, and can focus instead on playing and shaping the music. That is, making music.

Quote
Finally - do students sit for hours and hours doing drills? Yes, yes they do. I've heard many. I've heard many develop injuries through hours of mindless drills at top institutes in London (RAM and Trinity). That mind-set is largely discouraged in the UK these days.

I should certainly hope so.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: bennevis] #2844266
05/01/19 06:34 PM
05/01/19 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by fatar760
God there's so many things I disagree with in the last few posts:

Same here - I disagree with you on almost every point.

But I'll grant you that you completely misunderstood some important factors in the above arguments.


Quote
Playing musical does not necessary mean changing tempo

Have a listen to any great pianist playing lots of scales & arpeggios in K545.

Can you set a metronome to any of them? Go on, try it.

BTW, I don't mean changing tempo as in abrupt tempo change. I don't even mean rubato.

I mean 'breathing', something akin to what singers would do if they could take breaths without breaking the line.
Quote
If a singer is worried about their breath control then they're not very good singers. I actively encourage all my singing students to forget about their breath and put their focus on song context and, where required, ensuring the correct ligaments are being used to create the necessary and appropriate sounds required.

Ligaments?? smirk

Are you sure you don't mean muscles?

Aren't you forgetting something very important - something I know very well, having treated many singers myself? That their musical instrument is part of their body, in fact, part of their respiratory system?

Quote
Also, time is short. Practise time is even shorter. Why waste it on robotic, mindless exercises/drills, when we could be making music? To compare a pianist to a tennis player is a crazy comparison and the sort of mind-set that Hanon encourages. Different muscles. Different SUPPORT from the rest of the body. Different workload.

Tennis players practise drills so that every movement becomes instinctive - including footwork - so that they don't have to think about specific movements when playing, and instead concentrate on getting to, and hitting the ball.

A pianist practises exercises so that every movement - whether in scaler passages or some other common pianistic pattern of passagework - becomes instinctive, so that they don't have to consciously think about each individual movement of fingers, and can focus instead on playing and shaping the music. That is, making music.

Quote
Finally - do students sit for hours and hours doing drills? Yes, yes they do. I've heard many. I've heard many develop injuries through hours of mindless drills at top institutes in London (RAM and Trinity). That mind-set is largely discouraged in the UK these days.

I should certainly hope so.


Most of this response is arrogant and condescending so I shan't waste too much more energy engaging with such a person.

I did not "completely misunderstand" the argument. You, though, have been quite selective in what you've responded to in mine.

You CAN be musical without altering tempo. Go on, try it (!?)

With regards to ligaments. I meant ligaments. I should also have included cartilages though. I had not forgotten a singers musical instrument was part of their body and mentioned it to a group I taught just a few hours ago. Again, an arrogant comment.

That's me out on this one.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: fatar760] #2844271
05/01/19 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by fatar760


You CAN be musical without altering tempo. Go on, try it (!?)

Is any musical playing (or singing) ever metronomic?

Quote
With regards to ligaments. I meant ligaments.

You should read up on applied anatomy.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Nadia] #2844282
05/01/19 07:39 PM
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Obviously muscles and ligaments both "structurally function" in human activity, from this perspective I don't see anything wrong with "ligaments" in this context.

Especially for singing.

When you consider laryngeal structure, "ligament", has much more meaning than most other forms of human activity.

However, I believe bennevis is emphasizing efferent (motor) neurological input to muscles, with regards to the word "use". It's not wrong, but just a bit picky because it minimizes the intrinsic function of structure. After all, muscles work within the context of structure and in a sense their "function" is actually determined by it (both in terms of its internal structure and the external context it is in).

And when considering the role of sensory (afferent) information, in terms of any type of trained activity or coordination,
I'm far less confident you can be that picky.

Last edited by anamnesis; 05/01/19 07:41 PM.
Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: BruceD] #2844332
05/02/19 12:59 AM
05/02/19 12:59 AM
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Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
[...]When [Richter] was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.


But he wasn't talking about Hanon, was he? That's what this thread is about, I believe, and the virtue or not of mechanical exercises used to develop technique.

Regards,

Yes, indeed. Richter is particularly known for practicing repertoire pieces only, just as Godowsky and others from that camp. Richter said that in his entire life he had no more than 10 hours of out-of-piece scales practice and just a short period of practicing Burgmüller etudes when he was learning. I cited his words because I had an impression that he was accused of a mechanical practice of pieces. Most probably Richter never played Hanon exercises neither mechanically nor musically.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Nadia] #2844372
05/02/19 05:03 AM
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I think that taking a exceptional player like Richter or any other one as an example has little relevance anyway. None (no offense - well maybe an extremely small percentage) of the adult beginners have near the abilities of such a player, so whatever was his practice, it is not necessarily a good example to follow. There are kids out there that at age 8 can already play a Chopin Etude, so I guess for those Hanon or other similar exercices will not be very usefull.

Second point is that unless one has a detailed view of what was the daily practice of Richter (or others) when they were yet at a beginner level, taking some high level statements has not much interest and sometimes people make statements in a certain context which are not reflective of what they actually did or they implicitely do not refer to a particular moment of their life. Difficult to evaluate at best.

I do not see what sort of value added conclusions for a beginner/intermediate level adult trying to learn some piano can be drawn from all this.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Sidokar] #2844382
05/02/19 05:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Sidokar
I think that taking a exceptional player like Richter or any other one as an example has little relevance anyway. None (no offense - well maybe an extremely small percentage) of the adult beginners have near the abilities of such a player, so whatever was his practice, it is not necessarily a good example to follow.

There is something not right about your statement. Many of these exception pianists have written books. Some of them were teachers. For example, I've never heard anyone say that a "normal" pianist should not bother reading Heinrich Neuhaus' Art of Piano Playing because Neuhaus was too good of a pianist and he is not necessarily a good example to follow.

Perhaps you meant something else and I'm misinterpreting, so if so, please clarify your remarks. For example, are you referring to natural-born pianists who were not professional pedagogues? Neuhaus was a professional pedagogue, but I don't believe Richter was.


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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2844428
05/02/19 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
[...]When [Richter] was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.


But he wasn't talking about Hanon, was he? That's what this thread is about, I believe, and the virtue or not of mechanical exercises used to develop technique.

Regards,

Yes, indeed. Richter is particularly known for practicing repertoire pieces only, just as Godowsky and others from that camp. Richter said that in his entire life he had no more than 10 hours of out-of-piece scales practice and just a short period of practicing Burgmüller etudes when he was learning. I cited his words because I had an impression that he was accused of a mechanical practice of pieces. Most probably Richter never played Hanon exercises neither mechanically nor musically.


Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
[...]When [Richter] was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.


But he wasn't talking about Hanon, was he? That's what this thread is about, I believe, and the virtue or not of mechanical exercises used to develop technique.

Regards,

Yes, indeed. Richter is particularly known for practicing repertoire pieces only, just as Godowsky and others from that camp. Richter said that in his entire life he had no more than 10 hours of out-of-piece scales practice and just a short period of practicing Burgmüller etudes when he was learning. I cited his words because I had an impression that he was accused of a mechanical practice of pieces. Most probably Richter never played Hanon exercises neither mechanically nor musically.



I wonder if Richter can be taken at his word. Decades ago, when I was studying violin with a Russian teacher, an émigré from Moscow, he told me a story of when Richter was interviewed by a local television station. The interviewer asked Richter how much he practiced, and he replied something like, one or two hours a day, nobody needs to practice more than that. Then, the interviewer asked his wife how much he practiced, and she said, what, he never stops!

My violin teacher told me that that apartment building in Moscow was famous because nobody in it got a good night’a sleep. My teacher said that Richter played the same passages, twenty or thirty times in a row, always at ear splitting volumes.

You’re from Moscow, perhaps you have better sources than I have. Do you know anybody who lived in Richter’s building, perhaps the poor souls who lived downstairs from his apartment? Hahah!



Last edited by LarryK; 05/02/19 08:28 AM.

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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: LarryK] #2844448
05/02/19 10:18 AM
05/02/19 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by LarryK
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
[...]When [Richter] was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.


But he wasn't talking about Hanon, was he? That's what this thread is about, I believe, and the virtue or not of mechanical exercises used to develop technique.

Regards,

Yes, indeed. Richter is particularly known for practicing repertoire pieces only, just as Godowsky and others from that camp. Richter said that in his entire life he had no more than 10 hours of out-of-piece scales practice and just a short period of practicing Burgmüller etudes when he was learning. I cited his words because I had an impression that he was accused of a mechanical practice of pieces. Most probably Richter never played Hanon exercises neither mechanically nor musically.


Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by BruceD
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
[...]When [Richter] was specifically asked if he starts to play expressively at a slow tempo or later, he clearly stated, 'expressiveness right away'.


But he wasn't talking about Hanon, was he? That's what this thread is about, I believe, and the virtue or not of mechanical exercises used to develop technique.

Regards,

Yes, indeed. Richter is particularly known for practicing repertoire pieces only, just as Godowsky and others from that camp. Richter said that in his entire life he had no more than 10 hours of out-of-piece scales practice and just a short period of practicing Burgmüller etudes when he was learning. I cited his words because I had an impression that he was accused of a mechanical practice of pieces. Most probably Richter never played Hanon exercises neither mechanically nor musically.



I wonder if Richter can be taken at his word. Decades ago, when I was studying violin with a Russian teacher, an émigré from Moscow, he told me a story of when Richter was interviewed by a local television station. The interviewer asked Richter how much he practiced, and he replied something like, one or two hours a day, nobody needs to practice more than that. Then, the interviewer asked his wife how much he practiced, and she said, what, he never stops!

My violin teacher told me that that apartment building in Moscow was famous because nobody in it got a good night’a sleep. My teacher said that Richter played the same passages, twenty or thirty times in a row, always at ear splitting volumes.

You’re from Moscow, perhaps you have better sources than I have. Do you know anybody who lived in Richter’s building, perhaps the poor souls who lived downstairs from his apartment? Hahah!

I believe there was some misunderstanding in that interview. When describing his practice routine Richter said, 'I always play from the morning until 3 p.m. ... When I feel desire or I'm in a hurry before a concert I play up to 12 hours a day'. And this was quite a well-known fact about him, he was always considered workaholic and he didn't deny it.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2844457
05/02/19 10:46 AM
05/02/19 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by LarryK

I wonder if Richter can be taken at his word. Decades ago, when I was studying violin with a Russian teacher, an émigré from Moscow, he told me a story of when Richter was interviewed by a local television station. The interviewer asked Richter how much he practiced, and he replied something like, one or two hours a day, nobody needs to practice more than that. Then, the interviewer asked his wife how much he practiced, and she said, what, he never stops!

My violin teacher told me that that apartment building in Moscow was famous because nobody in it got a good night’a sleep. My teacher said that Richter played the same passages, twenty or thirty times in a row, always at ear splitting volumes.

You’re from Moscow, perhaps you have better sources than I have. Do you know anybody who lived in Richter’s building, perhaps the poor souls who lived downstairs from his apartment? Hahah!


Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev

I believe there was some misunderstanding in that interview. When describing his practice routine Richter said, 'I always play from the morning until 3 p.m. ... When I feel desire or I'm in a hurry before a concert I play up to 12 hours a day'. And this was quite a well-known fact about him, he was always considered workaholic and he didn't deny it.


I’d love to see that interview. Do you think it could be found? I am surprised that my teacher would have misunderstood it, especially the part about telling people that a few hours of practice a day was sufficient, but perhaps he did.

I think that the people downstairs could have written a book with the title, “Living Under Richter’s Piano,” or something like that. There was an article in the New York Times about people who lived next to musicians. I believe the guy living underneath Murray Perahia complained about the practicing, and Perahia, said, it’s my life, what can I do, and I’m playing Carnegie Hall tonight.

Perhaps you can help me. I saw a Russian film at a film festival many years ago. It showed Russian army troops showing up in a small remote village asking for water. The villagers showed the troops a small fountain, with a little water gushing out of it. The troops got dynamite, and blew up the well. After that, there was a tremendous amount of water for one minute, and then nothing. With no water, the villagers have to relocate to Moscow. It goes on. Any idea of the title of this movie? I want to tell it to a Russian friend but I cannot remember the title.


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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2844501
05/02/19 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

There is something not right about your statement. Many of these exception pianists have written books. Some of them were teachers. For example, I've never heard anyone say that a "normal" pianist should not bother reading Heinrich Neuhaus' Art of Piano Playing because Neuhaus was too good of a pianist and he is not necessarily a good example to follow.


I think you have a particular talent at reading between the lines the hidden meaning of one's comment. I am flattered that you think I have such a deep level of thinking and that I mean so many things in just a few lines but I have to confess that unhapilly for me I would have to disappoint you; my comment was quite pragmatic and in sequence with the thread. It all started with the usual discussion whether Hanon and drills in general are usefull; then it went on to the argument of wether someone like Richter was or not practising with drills. So I'll repeat my comments: 1-we do not have any detailed log of what Richter may have used as practice materials when he was at the beginner level; 2-assuming we had that, it would be of little relevance for most adult beginners/intermediate level players, as Richer had exceptional abilities and therefore whatever he was doing is not necessarily an example to follow. BTW given the exceptional skills of Richer, It is anyway very difficult to sort out what is the contribution of his practice and what is due to his talent.

Apart from that and in general terms, there are a lot of things to learn from great pianists, in terms of style, interpretation and piano technique. But for their daily routine and practice materials, I am skeptical unless one has the abilities and is aiming at becoming a pro virtuoso of a similar caliber.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Sidokar] #2844505
05/02/19 02:47 PM
05/02/19 02:47 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 7,144
Tyrone Slothrop Offline
Tyrone Slothrop  Offline

7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 7,144
Originally Posted by Sidokar
I think you have a particular talent at reading between the lines the hidden meaning of one's comment. I am flattered that you think I have such a deep level of thinking and that I mean so many things in just a few lines but I have to confess that unhapilly for me I would have to disappoint you; my comment was quite pragmatic and in sequence with the thread. It all started with the usual discussion whether Hanon and drills in general are usefull; then it went on to the argument of wether someone like Richter was or not practising with drills. So I'll repeat my comments: 1-we do not have any detailed log of what Richter may have used as practice materials when he was at the beginner level; 2-assuming we had that, it would be of little relevance for most adult beginners/intermediate level players, as Richer had exceptional abilities and therefore whatever he was doing is not necessarily an example to follow. BTW given the exceptional skills of Richer, It is anyway very difficult to sort out what is the contribution of his practice and what is due to his talent.

Ah. You were talking about what Richter "does" vs. what he "says." That was not clear in your post above since there are posts also above mentioning what these pianists say, also.

Yes, of course what top pianists "do" day-to-day is not a reflection of what you and I should do. I imagine for example, most top pianists left scales and most studies behind them - years and years behind in the "rear view mirror."

Personally, I was more more interested in what Richter, Neuhaus, and other top pianists "say" though, and not what they themselves do. I think what they say/recommend still has quite a lot of value for us of more modest abilities.


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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: LarryK] #2844509
05/02/19 02:56 PM
05/02/19 02:56 PM
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,259
Moscow, Russia
I
Iaroslav Vasiliev Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Iaroslav Vasiliev  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
I

Joined: May 2016
Posts: 1,259
Moscow, Russia
Originally Posted by LarryK

My violin teacher told me that that apartment building in Moscow was famous because nobody in it got a good night’a sleep. My teacher said that Richter played the same passages, twenty or
I’d love to see that interview. Do you think it could be found? I am surprised that my teacher would have misunderstood it, especially the part about telling people that a few hours of practice a day was sufficient, but perhaps he did.

I think that the people downstairs could have written a book with the title, “Living Under Richter’s Piano,” or something like that. There was an article in the New York Times about people who lived next to musicians. I believe the guy living underneath Murray Perahia complained about the practicing, and Perahia, said, it’s my life, what can I do, and I’m playing Carnegie Hall tonight.

Perhaps you can help me. I saw a Russian film at a film festival many years ago. It showed Russian army troops showing up in a small remote village asking for water. The villagers showed the troops a small fountain, with a little water gushing out of it. The troops got dynamite, and blew up the well. After that, there was a tremendous amount of water for one minute, and then nothing. With no water, the villagers have to relocate to Moscow. It goes on. Any idea of the title of this movie? I want to tell it to a Russian friend but I cannot remember the title.

You know, poor people in that apartment building have had no rest even after Richter's death, because his apartment was turned into Richter museum and his rather large practice room was turned into small concert hall. smile At least his apartment is located on the last floor of the building.

I haven't seen that film or that interview, sorry.

Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Iaroslav Vasiliev] #2844511
05/02/19 03:08 PM
05/02/19 03:08 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,168
New York City
L
LarryK Offline
1000 Post Club Member
LarryK  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
L

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,168
New York City
Originally Posted by Iaroslav Vasiliev
Originally Posted by LarryK

My violin teacher told me that that apartment building in Moscow was famous because nobody in it got a good night’a sleep. My teacher said that Richter played the same passages, twenty or
I’d love to see that interview. Do you think it could be found? I am surprised that my teacher would have misunderstood it, especially the part about telling people that a few hours of practice a day was sufficient, but perhaps he did.

I think that the people downstairs could have written a book with the title, “Living Under Richter’s Piano,” or something like that. There was an article in the New York Times about people who lived next to musicians. I believe the guy living underneath Murray Perahia complained about the practicing, and Perahia, said, it’s my life, what can I do, and I’m playing Carnegie Hall tonight.

Perhaps you can help me. I saw a Russian film at a film festival many years ago. It showed Russian army troops showing up in a small remote village asking for water. The villagers showed the troops a small fountain, with a little water gushing out of it. The troops got dynamite, and blew up the well. After that, there was a tremendous amount of water for one minute, and then nothing. With no water, the villagers have to relocate to Moscow. It goes on. Any idea of the title of this movie? I want to tell it to a Russian friend but I cannot remember the title.

You know, poor people in that apartment building have had no rest even after Richter's death, because his apartment was turned into Richter museum and his rather large practice room was turned into small concert hall. smile At least his apartment is located on the last floor of the building.

I haven't seen that film or that interview, sorry.


Haha, no peace, ever!

Is the last floor the top floor or the bottom floor? :-) If the top floor, somebody suffered underneath him.

I live on the top floor.

When I looked at my current apartment, I let on that I played the classical guitar. Thinking I had made an error, I said that nobody had ever complained about my playing. The agent said, that’s nothing, there was a grand piano where you are standing the last time I sold this place.

It turned out that there is classical pianist who can be heard playing from my windows who lives in the next building. I think she passes the piano playing disease to each new owner, as I am thinking I need an acoustic upright. I can’t believe there was a grand in my rather small apartment but I know a New Yorker who lives with two harpsichords and a Steinway grand in about the same space, so anything is possible.

Last edited by LarryK; 05/02/19 03:16 PM.

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Re: Hanon exercises - to completion? [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2844573
05/02/19 05:46 PM
05/02/19 05:46 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 355
S
Sidokar Offline
Full Member
Sidokar  Offline
Full Member
S

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 355
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

Ah. You were talking about what Richter "does" vs. what he "says." That was not clear in your post above since there are posts also above mentioning what these pianists say, also.


Is there someone that love music that would not be interested to know what great musicians have to say about music and their art ?

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