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Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? #2837738
04/10/19 04:19 PM
04/10/19 04:19 PM
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neve1064 Offline OP
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I was told to search until I found a piano that had the touch and tone I love and buy it no matter if it’s new or not.

I was told the action can be tailored to my liking but it’s better to find one where the action is already perfect for my hands.

I was told the tone of the piano can be voiced but the overall tone is already there and you can’t change it much.

With these tenets in my I began my search.

So I’ve been auditioning pianos for a few months and I’ve come close but no cigar yet. A piano restorer I know has a Steinway B that’s going to be redone completely except for the soundboard. I listened to the board and it’s rich a booming. I took my fist and hit the center of the board since all the strings are taken off. Is this a good way to tell if a sound board is good and does it for tell the type of tone it will have once refurbished?

He’s going to refurbish it anyway, so he will use hammers I tend to like and adjust the action to my liking. Am I barking up the wrong tree? Should I just continue to search? I don’t mind doing so but I’m at that point where this option seems interesting to me. Thoughts? And lastly, can two actions be made to feel similar to each other or is action kind of like the sound board issue where it’s got a soul of its own? I guess why I ask this is because I’m thinking if I have a good sound board and a restorer whose willing to custom tailor the action to my liking, why not go that route?

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Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837779
04/10/19 05:32 PM
04/10/19 05:32 PM
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P W Grey Offline
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The best answer to each of your questions is: "It depends". So much rests on the ACTUAL condition of the raw material (piano) to work with, and the skill of who's doing It. I wish I could be more specific for you but you can search through many of the discussions on this forum and getting plenty of supporting arguments for either side.

If you have confidence and trust that your restorer is giving you the straight scoop (maybe some similar examples to try out) I suggest listening to him/her.

Pwg


Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837809
04/10/19 07:05 PM
04/10/19 07:05 PM
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It’s good to try examples of restorers work if possible.


RPT
PTG Member
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837830
04/10/19 08:27 PM
04/10/19 08:27 PM
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If he is willing to rebuild it to your liking without commitment to buy, why would you not wait and see how it turns out? Doesn't cost you anything, and it strikes me that you might just have found a good deal.

Afraid I don't understand why you felt you needed to punch the soundboard - it didn't do anything to you LOL smile
I am surprised he let you do that!

The tone will depend on the bridge installation (cap notches and bridge pin precision, etc.), re-stringing skill, and hammer installation (proper striking line vs fouled up means the difference between a lively clear tone and a dead non sustaining tone).
There are so many factors OTHER than soundboard is what I am trying to explain, so hitting a soundboard with your fist is about a worthwhile as thumping a watermelon-- sounds good, but that won't tell you how it tastes?

I have to remember your name- and never let you in our shop when we are rebuilding!!! LOL wink


Parks and Sons Piano Service
www.parksandsonspiano.com
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Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837841
04/10/19 09:05 PM
04/10/19 09:05 PM
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Chernobieff Piano Offline
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I do soundboard tap testing all the time. The problem with the test is that its a comparative test. You have to tap test quite a few boards to know what they are suppose to sound like, otherwise you will most likely think the board is fantastic when in fact it may not be. I have an advantage that I get to hear new boards. A good resonating board will have a deep boom on impact with your fist and have about a five second sustain. Should sound similar to a timpani. The proper tap test, in my opinion, is with the plate out. Some pianos need the assist of the mass of the plate for sustain, which is a false read of the board proper.
-chris


Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: P W Grey] #2837852
04/10/19 10:27 PM
04/10/19 10:27 PM
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neve1064 Offline OP
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Thank you for your reply. He has many examples of pianos he has refurbished. They seems to be good.

Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: Rick_Parks] #2837855
04/10/19 10:28 PM
04/10/19 10:28 PM
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neve1064 Offline OP
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He hit it first. It was a beautiful book sound. Dark and resonant. I would never do that unless he had done it first.

Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: Rick_Parks] #2837858
04/10/19 10:37 PM
04/10/19 10:37 PM
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neve1064 Offline OP
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Rick Parks, the bridge is critical to a good sound? He mentioned that he was going to make a custom bridge and it’s typically done by hand with a 5 degree angle. Is this a conventional standard?

Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: Chernobieff Piano] #2837862
04/10/19 10:43 PM
04/10/19 10:43 PM
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neve1064 Offline OP
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Chernobieff,

This sound board resonated like a timpani. He has around 20 grands all waiting for refurbishment. I can walk around and tap the different sound boards but what do I know? He has a temperature and humidity controlled room with probably 10 sound boards in it. He let me see them and feel them. I have to say I’m really interested in the entire process and mechanics of pianos. He has someone coming to install and “crown” a board into one of the grands. He invited me to see the process go down. Wherever I am, I record myself playing the same pieces in my phone. I listen back and hear such a difference between each piano. I’m loving the whole experience of learning about pianos and learning to listen closer to what’s actually happening.

Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837917
04/11/19 05:53 AM
04/11/19 05:53 AM
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Don't get too hung up on soundboards 'ringing like a timpani'. I've had literally hundreds of spruce soundboards through my hands, they were guitar and violin soundboards rather than piano. All but a very few had a distinctive vibrant ring to them. The pitch increases significantly and the 'sustain' drops significantly if the wood is thicker. If I'm honest it's never told me very much at all. I don't even tap the soundboards anymore. I measure them in terms of density and stiffness (which are closely correlated in softwoods). You can't even go by ring or grain count. It's common to hear people state that the finer the grain the 'better' the soundboard. It's largely nonsense. I've measured soundboards at 8 GPI being denser and stiffer than soundboards at 18 GPI.
If the piano is going to be rebuilt anyway why don't you just ask if you can try it before making any commitment?

Last edited by Michael P Walsh; 04/11/19 05:54 AM.
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837962
04/11/19 08:53 AM
04/11/19 08:53 AM
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What is the year of the B?


Sally Phillips
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Steinway & Sons Pianos
Columbus, GA
New Steinway, Boston and Essex pianos
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http://www.pianobuyer.com/current-issue/07a-should-i-have-my-piano-rebuilt.html
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2837981
04/11/19 09:49 AM
04/11/19 09:49 AM
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To add a somewhat different perspective...

While we all want to get the perfect piano, sometimes it can be beneficial to keep an open mind about what we think we want. For instance, I took a big risk selling my Steinway (which I really liked a lot) to get a M&H which sounded and felt ‘ok’ when I first checked it out. I really thought I’d miss the Steinway sound even if I did get the M&H decent, but after doing a lot of work on my M&H it became a nice instrument and I haven’t missed the Steinway at all, and have even come to prefer my M&H (I have played and worked on the Steinway since selling it, so it’s not a case of a faded memory of what it was).

Without being able to play the B you don’t have much to go on, but if you trust the technician’s work and judgement then you could potentially just go into it knowing it’ll be a good final result (objectively speaking) and then adapt your liking to it.

Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838087
04/11/19 02:37 PM
04/11/19 02:37 PM
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Chernobieff Piano Offline
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Piano Soundboards are a much different creature than guitars and violins. They carry lighter loads and thus demand lighter structures and are thus built on different principles such as the box. The piano is a percussion instrument, not just because a hammer strikes a string, but also because the soundboard acts like a stretched membrane(spring).

Many try using scientific instruments on piano soundboards but the complexity of the variability of stiffness in one board, let alone many boards are mind boggling and in my opinion counterproductive. I believe i have gone deeper into that complexity and have quantified a simple system to measure that variability of stiffness in piano soundboards more than anyone else. If its not a simple system or if its just a digital image on a screen it's not going to be practical in the shop.

One example of how practicality can be a superior method than trying to reverse engineer on a computer screen, is the example of using sunlight. Harpsichord builders a while back discovered that holding a soundboard up to the sunlight allowed one to see through the panel and see the dense spots. Since a piano soundboard is much thicker this is obviously not an option. But a good tool is the tap test, after all, if the idea is to build an instrument for others to enjoy listening to, then we as builders need to have the ability to listen to a board.

Most boards are too stiff around the perimeter and do not totally take advantage of the parabolic curve from center to rim. Other stiff board problems are uneven rib scales, incorrect panel thicknesses and grading schemes, Poor engineering, adding excessive cut-off bars,etc. All of these things have the effect of making a piano sound smaller. Excessive stiff boards are a higher pitched board with short sustain times compared to boards that have more flexibility. This is because when the same energy input is delivered into each, the stiffer board will absorb the acoustic energy quickly, because it has to work harder to move it, and the less stiff board will not require as much effort to get the board moving and thus vibrate longer. This is why the boom on a tap test is important, the lower the pitch the more flexible the board is.

The piano is very forgiving. All of the above errors can be present and it seems a vast majority of people will still enjoy the thing.

As long as the cracks don't buzz...................


Last edited by Chernobieff Piano; 04/11/19 02:41 PM.

Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838187
04/11/19 08:27 PM
04/11/19 08:27 PM
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But again I say, just because one thumps a soundboard does NOT mean the rebuilding will turn out a great sound.


Parks and Sons Piano Service
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Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838197
04/11/19 09:01 PM
04/11/19 09:01 PM
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Did someone make that claim that thumping was a cure all?
As far as I know it just one link of many in the chain.
-chris


Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838207
04/11/19 09:42 PM
04/11/19 09:42 PM
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There is no piano, even of the highest quality, that a rebuilder cannot turn into a pile of junk.


Semipro Tech
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838214
04/11/19 10:26 PM
04/11/19 10:26 PM
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P W Grey Offline
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But a very good rebuilder can do some amazing things with what (to the untrained eye) may look like junk.

Pwg


Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: Chernobieff Piano] #2838312
04/12/19 07:33 AM
04/12/19 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Chernobieff Piano
Did someone make that claim that thumping was a cure all?
As far as I know it just one link of many in the chain.
-chris

I was not saying claiming anyone did... I was actually trying to make the point that you just made in your last sentence there... Addressing the point that the person was hitting the soundboard on the piano the tech was already planning to rebuild... The person knows nothing about what to listen for anyway. AND, what good would it do in making the decision- the rest of the rebuilding is what makes or breaks a piano... Even a not so great soundboard can sound wonderful, given the proper work in a rebuild.
These were my points- perhaps I was not clear, because my statements are in segments?
The point is, thumping a soundboard on a S&S grand that has not been rebuilt is not going to (or should not) be the deciding help that is needed. Reason out what you want in a piano, look at the plans for it, inspect the skill of the rebuilder, and make a decision on what he/she and you have concluded the piano COULD become in the end. Don't let a tech thumping a soundboard be the deciding factor for you either.
These are the points I was addressing.


Parks and Sons Piano Service
www.parksandsonspiano.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838349
04/12/19 09:01 AM
04/12/19 09:01 AM
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My experience with "thumping" has been that it is a totally mixed bag. IOW with plate in the piano...nice ringing thump...plate out...dull and "lifeless"...move the piano to one side of the shop...it rings nicely...move it to the other side of the shop...dull, "lifeless". I still do it, but basically just for fun. I make my determination about the piano after it is all strung and the action is working nicely. Otherwise I think I'm just fooling myself.

Pwg


Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838389
04/12/19 11:14 AM
04/12/19 11:14 AM
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Peter,
Here are my thoughts on that, since I have struggled with that as well in the beginning. BTW, if you put different material under the casters the tone will change too (carpet, tile, caster cup etc.).

What I do is test every piano the same way in the same spot in the shop. I thump in the perceived center on the bridge (yes, I have pin scars on my hand). Every board should boom and sustain without the plate contributing. If it doesn't, then something is not working as it should.

Usually material has to be removed from somewhere to get it to sing. Most of what I have written in the past was simply for that purpose. However, you do need to hear one that works right, to have one to compare to for sure. Also, it’s very satisfying to take one that didn’t sing and turn it into an opera star. My first experience with this was at Darrell Fandrich’s shop(not Del). Often he would take a router and thin the panel around key locations. In some cases separate the panel from the rim (floating). And in other cases add material when its too thin (riblets).

I have a Baldwin L in my shop right now with an original board, and it sings, sings, sings. I've had Baldwin L's in the past that didn't. So why is that? Thankfully, I have been making measurements and taking notes for years. The L currently in my shop has a panel that is a little thinner than the others, is graded correctly, and has a lower rib profile structure than the others had.

Overall, I think it’s very similar to voicing new hammers. Hammers have to be “opened” up and made to “bloom”, so why not soundboards too?
-chris

Last edited by Chernobieff Piano; 04/12/19 11:18 AM.

Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838515
04/12/19 07:08 PM
04/12/19 07:08 PM
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P W Grey Offline
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I guess its essentially the same as the Chladni Pattern procedure that some European factories use, as well as luthiers (some anyway).

Pwg


Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838516
04/12/19 07:09 PM
04/12/19 07:09 PM
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I guess its essentially the same as the Chladni Pattern procedure that some European factories use, as well as luthiers (some anyway). Except they know exactly what they're looking for.

Pwg

Oops...double post

Last edited by P W Grey; 04/12/19 07:10 PM.

Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838670
04/13/19 09:55 AM
04/13/19 09:55 AM
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I didn't find the Chladni Patterns very useful for piano soundboard construction. In Luthier work you can easily remove a top plate and make minute structural adjustments. Since guitars and violins are small relative to a piano soundboard, small adjustments become important for targeting a pitch. With a large surface area to work with, adjustments can be more crude and forgiving. I would also say that tonal targeting and opening up a board are two different objectives.
-chris


Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2838721
04/13/19 01:18 PM
04/13/19 01:18 PM
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Chris,

I think I agree.

About 15 years ago (in DC) Ulrich Sauter (I'm pretty sure) gave a presentation at Pianocraft, and in it were some slides (maybe some video...dont recall) of a bellyman spreading "sand" on the soundboard, and I think pounding the soundboard allowing the sand to form patterns on the surface, after which he would mark the board, remove the sand, and then scrape the board (thinning) in the selected areas, repeat, repeat until he got what he was looking for. A precise description of the process was not forthcoming, but it seems to me he was doing what you do, but in a different way. Yes?

Pwg


Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839271
04/15/19 12:53 AM
04/15/19 12:53 AM
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Peter,
Before I answered you, i checked out some Chladni pattern videos and did a little reading on it. My take away, is that its not the same thing that I am doing. It seems to me that you can make an array of patterns by changing the frequency of the test piece. And the object seems to be just to make the patterns? What I do is listen to the natural tone of the board and open it up (increase sustain) if it needs it. I have a demo board that I made awhile back for the purpose of taking it to classes so techs could hear what a board should sound like. It was quite effective.
-chris


Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839315
04/15/19 05:29 AM
04/15/19 05:29 AM
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Peter, Steingraeber modifies soundboard panels by using sand.

" Steingraeber's principle of deploying individual membranes

The vaulted soundboard made of resonating wood is built like a loudspeaker system encompassing tweeter, midrange and woofer. Every piece of wood varies in how it measures up!

Thus Steingraeber customizes the thinning out of the spruce by means of a sand examination with fine sand strewn over the soundboard. By tapping on the bridge we can identify which areas are “mobile” and which are “immobile”. This is how a conically spherical soundboard comes to life.

We individually match the braces of the soundboard membrane to the conical vaulting before gluing them into place. Ultimately they are worked into a curved line with constantly varying angles."

http://laureate-concert-group.com/pianos.html

Since Pianocraft is a Steingraeber dealer, this may be whom you were thinking of.

You may have never heard a Steingraeber, Chris. I have, both in person on a number of occasions and in multiple recordings. No one would ever accuse their instruments of lacking in sustain, and their pianos are rightly considered to be among the very finest in the world.

"And the object seems to be just to make the patterns? " Really, Chris? Sigh....

Will Truitt


fine grand piano custom rebuilding, piano technician and tuner
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839392
04/15/19 08:38 AM
04/15/19 08:38 AM
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P W Grey Offline
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Will,

There is a very strong possibility that you are correct. My memory told me it was one or the other and the first name started with "U". I just could not remember for sure. I do recall though that he did not want to divulge too much information (for somewhat obvious reasons) and many of us in the audience were clamoring for more. He just smiled and moved on.

I suspect there are parallels between that and Chris's procedure even though not identical. I have read about "voicing" soundboards in some other factory (European I think) through tapping and chiseling if ribs. Long time ago...dont recall where...


Chris,

I certainly would be interested to see and hear your method(s) someday.

Pwg


Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839436
04/15/19 10:12 AM
04/15/19 10:12 AM
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Udo Steingraeber, Peter?


fine grand piano custom rebuilding, piano technician and tuner
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839524
04/15/19 01:21 PM
04/15/19 01:21 PM
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Chernobieff Piano Offline
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Chernobieff Piano  Offline
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Will,
Yes I have heard of Steingraeber, played on a few of them too. Regarding their use of chladni patterns, do you actually know what they do? and what the goal is?
Or did you just copy and paste what was on their website? The descriptions they give, that you quoted, is rather vague as to what the purpose is and how it is achieved.
Its not enough to say you want this section to be a tweeter, and this section to be a woofer. It don't work like that. I think the chladni patterns are cool, and i certainly have an open mind about it. The acoustics book of his has forever been in French only, just came out in english, but too pricey for me.
-chris

Last edited by Chernobieff Piano; 04/15/19 01:23 PM.

Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839567
04/15/19 03:24 PM
04/15/19 03:24 PM
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It would be fair to say that my understanding of this method to achieve a better response from the soundboard (however one wants to define that) certainly has its limits. And I have no direct experience working with Chladni patterns and piano soundboards. I have seen Chladni patterns demonstrated with a guitar top plate by a guitar maker when I visited his shop, he is also a luthier wood supplier. How directly that translates to a piano soundboard, I can't speak to. I don't know what Steingraeber's goals are. What I copied and pasted was yes (gasp) copied from their website. I should have hidden the link, that made it a dead giveaway! It was the only thing I could find. Why don't you contact them directly and ask them?

I will take a stab though, although I think the vibrating of a piano soundboard is a very complex system with many variables that contribute to the response of the panel that we experience by our means of testing. But I think they hint at what they mean with the use of the words "mobile" and "immobile". (The language used is likely translated from the German, and the meanings may end up being somewhat different, depending on the language). The Chladni method organizes the sand in different patterns depending on what frequency they are testing. It can identify "dead zones" within a panel. Anyway, I would think of a panel being more or less responsive at specific frequencies and locations. The areas of least activity will have the sand congregate there, it is not being moved by the induced vibration nearly so much. In those zones I would say that more energy is being lost by being absorbed by the wood itself as heat, which would also be affected by the thickness of the panel, the closeness of the perimeter and bridges, and the ribbing. What I think they are doing is thinning the panel in these less responsive areas.

Also, a piece of wood of a given thickness is not going to have a uniform response throughout. If you take several pieces of soundboard spruce lumber or Maple bridge stock of the same dimensions and do a tap test on them, you will find that the individual pieces will have differing responses, and that will also be true within a single piece. So there is a lot of variablility, despite the use of the best available materials and careful design and workmanship.

We certainly want the whole board to be the most responsive we can make it by our thinning, and we want it to avoid it having resonant peaks as much as possible; i.e. respond uniformly across the frequency band.

I know it doesn't work like that. You know it doesn't work like that. The people at Steingraeber know that it doesn't work like that . The man on the street doesn't know, and marketing doesn't care. What's your point, beyond stating the obvious?

This from Harold Conklin, https://www.speech.kth.se/music/5_lectures/conklin/howdoes.html. He did a lot of research on this at Baldwin win back in the sixties and seventies.

Will


fine grand piano custom rebuilding, piano technician and tuner
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839625
04/15/19 05:40 PM
04/15/19 05:40 PM
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Yes Will, it could very well be Udo. Keith Kerman would know for sure as he was there (for obvious reasons).

I do not remember tone generation being used in this process (but my memory is a little cloudy). I thought I remembered pounding on the board rather vigorously to create the patterns. But I repeat that we were being SHOWN a process rather than being taught how to do it. Precisely what the guy was looking for and specifically how to "fix" it was not being fully discussed. It was pretty cool though, I thought.

Tom's demo of Chladni patterns that day in his shop, reminded me of that occasion. If I knew how to deal with what I saw, I would fool around with it, but I freely concede that I don't.

Pwg

Last edited by P W Grey; 04/15/19 05:41 PM.

Peter W. Grey, RPT
New Hampshire Seacoast
www.seacoastpianodoctor.com
pianodoctor57@gmail.com
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0T7_I_nV8
Re: Should I have an old Steinway custom refurbished? [Re: neve1064] #2839794
04/16/19 09:03 AM
04/16/19 09:03 AM
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Posts: 411
Chernobieff Piano Offline
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Will,
Thanks for the Conklin Link. I read it years ago but forgot about it. So going by Peters description of what Steingraber may have been doing, was to focus on mode 1 of the soundboard. Which is to narrow the band of sand around the perimeter and any dead spots in the center field. I think i'll play with that on the next board and see what happens.
I currently have a Baldwin from the 70's in my shop, and yes it's a fantastic sounding board. Even the rib structure was good ( with only 1 rib in the rib scale seemingly out of place). I recommended to the owner not to replace the board, even though it had suffered some damage from vandalism. Every time i work on a Baldwin, they climb higher on my "Best Piano List".
Thanks again.
-chris


Maker of Fine Piano Soundboards
Chernobieff Piano Restorations
Lenoir City, Tennessee
www.chernobieffpiano.com
grandpianoman@protonmail.com
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