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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
keystring #2835230 04/04/19 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by Stubbie
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

My bigger worry would be:
a) the teacher does not criticize, because then there is no growth
b) the criticism is unrealistic: i.e. not linked to skills or means that also have to be given to a student in order to reach these things.
How would you know these things from the interview?

These may be valid worries, keystring, and I know you had a bad experience, but going into the interview expecting the worst invites anxiety, disappointment, and inaction.

I honestly missed the fact that this was being asked in the context of an interview. I think I missed the point and was thinking it was a warning about lessons in general. Hm, rethinking this. So - "seriously criticize" in an interview. I guess that would not be someone who is a novice, because there would be nothing TO criticize. Therefore Wuffski is painting the scenario where you've done some learning, and for example, you're playing for the teacher.

In that case, I'd imagine the teacher would be assessing my strengths, weaknesses, and holes in my abilities. I suppose that identified weaknesses might be seen as "criticism" but I don't think that way. I'm not sure that I actually understand Wuffski's point or scenario. (?)

Where I would feel uneasy in such a scenario is if the teacher simply said "oh how wonderful" to everything, because I do hope there would be things to work on and learn. If I can already do everything well, I don't need a teacher.
I read Wiffski's "serious criticism" as the student being prepared to accept instruction without the resistance that adults sometimes feel and exhibit. Cruel criticism is something that is never acceptable, but serious criticism to me means criticism that is given with thought and insight into what I am doing. I learn from that kind of serious criticism.


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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835244 04/04/19 10:56 AM
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Two cents from another adult beginner in their 30s, returning after 25+ years break after a few years of piano lesson in a different country and wanting to focus on classical.

Something you can find out during interview or prior:

* Teacher's interest or certificate/degree(?) in piano pedagogy would be a plus for me. Someone is paying money and putting time and effort into furthering their skills as a teacher? This is also an indicator that s/he has chosen to teach piano as their profession, not a quick-buck-to-make-rent. Definitely a plus in my book - but it's not a deal maker or breaker.

* If their curriculum is based ABSRM/CRM and you don't care for those, are they willing to deviate from their routine? I'm at the moment ambivalent in the sense it'd probably help me become more well rounded in my piano skills but I don't care for actually taking exams nor would I get emotional satisfaction from progressing in my levels.

* Their perspective on how practice should be done. Quality > quantity, obviously. But is that really reflected in their expectation?

Something you will find out during first few (or many?) lessons:

* Usually adults have more concrete goals in what they want to achieve than kids (goals? what are those? said little Roadkill). Usually adults also have time constraints. My teacher should be working with me, and I with him/her, to find the right balance between building fundamental skills and working on pieces that'd bring me joy to play piano, with time constraint in mind.

* S/he would be glad to answer many questions I suspect I will have, in a way that I can understand and internalize. If I'm being corrected and I don't understand why, you bet I'll be asking questions. If I were to just follow instruction without understanding, that'd be imitation, not correction.


I'm looking for a teacher myself so I'm reading this thread with much interest.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Stubbie #2835247 04/04/19 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Stubbie
I read Wiffski's "serious criticism" as the student being prepared to accept instruction without the resistance that adults sometimes feel and exhibit. Cruel criticism is something that is never acceptable, but serious criticism to me means criticism that is given with thought and insight into what I am doing. I learn from that kind of serious criticism.


Where can I find this article/comment? Sounds like something I'd be interested in reading to better prep myself.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Wuffski #2835254 04/04/19 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Roadkill
Originally Posted by Stubbie
I read Wiffski's "serious criticism" as the student being prepared to accept instruction without the resistance that adults sometimes feel and exhibit. Cruel criticism is something that is never acceptable, but serious criticism to me means criticism that is given with thought and insight into what I am doing. I learn from that kind of serious criticism.


Where can I find this article/comment? Sounds like something I'd be interested in reading to better prep myself.
I'm not sure I understand your question. What I wrote was in response to keystring's response to Wuffski's post earlier in the thread.

Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".


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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835255 04/04/19 11:22 AM
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Hah, didn't realize that was a poster you were referring to. Okay, carry on.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835256 04/04/19 11:25 AM
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I was did write a long reply to this but decided to delete it. So I'll just shorten it to TELL them what you want and type of instructor you're looking for, then let them describe their approach and materials they use. I find telling them what I'm looking for is a faster process than asking question they will all just tell you what you want to hear to get at least a few bucks out of you.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Roadkill #2835297 04/04/19 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Roadkill
Two cents from another adult beginner in their 30s, returning after 25+ years break after a few years of piano lesson in a different country and wanting to focus on classical.

Something you can find out during interview or prior:

* Teacher's interest or certificate/degree(?) in piano pedagogy would be a plus for me. Someone is paying money and putting time and effort into furthering their skills as a teacher? This is also an indicator that s/he has chosen to teach piano as their profession, not a quick-buck-to-make-rent. Definitely a plus in my book - but it's not a deal maker or breaker.

* If their curriculum is based ABSRM/CRM and you don't care for those, are they willing to deviate from their routine? I'm at the moment ambivalent in the sense it'd probably help me become more well rounded in my piano skills but I don't care for actually taking exams nor would I get emotional satisfaction from progressing in my levels.

* Their perspective on how practice should be done. Quality > quantity, obviously. But is that really reflected in their expectation?

Something you will find out during first few (or many?) lessons:

* Usually adults have more concrete goals in what they want to achieve than kids (goals? what are those? said little Roadkill). Usually adults also have time constraints. My teacher should be working with me, and I with him/her, to find the right balance between building fundamental skills and working on pieces that'd bring me joy to play piano, with time constraint in mind.

* S/he would be glad to answer many questions I suspect I will have, in a way that I can understand and internalize. If I'm being corrected and I don't understand why, you bet I'll be asking questions. If I were to just follow instruction without understanding, that'd be imitation, not correction.


I'm looking for a teacher myself so I'm reading this thread with much interest.



Excellent points. Thank you.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Wuffski #2835454 04/04/19 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".



If feedback from your teacher is criticism of you, then that's a problem with the teacher's communication.

If the teacher is providing feedback about your piano playing and you believe it to be criticizing you, then it's probably a problem with your self image.

If either of these problems is present in a teacher-student relationship the whole thing is doomed.


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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
malkin #2835462 04/04/19 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by malkin
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

If feedback from your teacher is criticism of you, then that's a problem with the teacher's communication.

If the teacher is providing feedback about your piano playing and you believe it to be criticizing you, then it's probably a problem with your self image.

If either of these problems is present in a teacher-student relationship the whole thing is doomed.

Yet, I wonder how many of these doomed teacher student relationships exist out there? More students might consider critiquing for their parents their relationships with their teachers when bringing home their report cards! wink For the record, my relationship with my advanced chem teacher in high school was doomed from the beginning! laugh


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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Sam S #2835486 04/04/19 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Sam S
There is a good discussion in the book "The Well-Tempered Keyboard Teacher". I urge you to get that book if are interested in all topics related to teaching piano.

As a confirmed biblophile, I was scouting Amazon.com today and found the following book which will only be released in about 4 months: The Tyranny of Tradition in Piano Teaching: A Critical History of Instruction from Clementi to the Present, by Walter Ponce. Here is the Amazon.com blurb:
Quote
The strict traditions of piano teaching have remained entrenched for generations. The dominant influence of Muzio Clementi (1752-1832), the first composer-pedagogue of the instrument, brought about an explosion of autocratic instruction and bizarre teaching systems, exemplified in the mind-numbing drills of Hanon's "The Virtuoso Pianist."
These practices--considered absurd or abusive by many students--persist today at all levels of piano education. Reflecting the author's belief that learning piano is both gratifying and exasperating, this book critically examines two centuries of teaching methods and encourages instructors to do away with traditions that disconnect mental and creative skills.

Concert pianist and pedagogue, Walter Ponce received his masters and doctor degrees from the Juilliard School. He has performed around the world as soloist with symphony orchestras, in solo recitals, and in collaboration with many renowned artists. He is a distinguished professor emeritus and former director of keyboard studies at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

Some here might find this interesting smile


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"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835496 04/04/19 11:15 PM
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Bored so I'll add a few words even though these kinds of threads can be dangerous wink

Bashing students on the teacher's forum may not be nice, but honestly what bothers me more is to read basically entry level questions from people who already teach...cannot imagine how it would be to be taught by someone who does not know these things and has to ask on an internet forum...I think that could at least be avoided by choosing a teacher who has a degree in teaching piano. I am not a piano teacher and only an adult student but even I know these things...

There are several levels of knowledge and it's easy to gather lots of superficial information from the internet and assume that you know more than your teacher. But it is also possible to research things throroughly and have meaningful and respectful discussions with a piano teacher whether you are an adult or a young one...even some children can be exceptionally mature for their age.

It is also possible to know more than the teacher, especially when dealing with learning difficulties. One may be the first student the teacher has seen with a specific combination of problems. If the teacher is only interested in applying an established teaching methods things may not work out. BTW. I am sure teachers meet "impossible to teach" kids as well, but maybe it's easier to get them to drop out ? Some adults can be obsessive and persistent and do not want to quit smile

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Gary D. #2835510 04/05/19 02:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by Sam S

Which brings up another question the the OP could ask - Does the prospective teacher belong to any professional organizations and attend conferences to further their education?

Sam


Well, Sam, I don't belong to any professional organizations, and I don't attend conferences. I took one pedagogy course, required, at the age of around 21. Just pointing out that their are exceptions to every rule.

Here is my own recommendation to adults: Find someone who can do what you want to do and who is learning how to do it from a good teacher, then try taking lessons from that teacher.

I don't teach to tests. I'm not a member of anything, for my own reasons. What I do with 8 year olds, 18 year olds and 58 year olds is essentially the same.

1. You have to learn to read, otherwise you remain musically illiterate. That says, there are some pretty famous and successful illiterates, but all I have met have regretted not learning to read AND have reported failures which I believe are due to poor teaching.

2. You need scales of some kind, because all music uses them.

3. You need chords, and their names. Without this you can never play a fake book, or improvise, but you also can't break down traditional music logically making it harder to learn and memorize, if you wish
to.


That's it. Contrary to almost everything I'm reading here I find that my students, of all ages, tend to like the same music, with obvious individual differences. The biggest difference from student to student is not what they want to play but what they are ABLE to play, and how big the gap is between present reality and what they hope to eventually master.


I loathed school. Most of my students hate school. That is an immediate bond. wink


You'd like my teacher.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
outo #2835517 04/05/19 03:51 AM
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Originally Posted by outo


Bashing students on the teacher's forum may not be nice, but honestly what bothers me more is to read basically entry level questions from people who already teach...cannot imagine how it would be to be taught by someone who does not know these things and has to ask on an internet forum...I think that could at least be avoided by choosing a teacher who has a degree in teaching piano. I am not a piano teacher and only an adult student but even I know these things...

Pedagogy degrees don't make teachers immune to blinkered self-deception (for want of a better term): that they are not responsible for the consequences........like the fact that the child student they've had for years still can't read music, and they did not have a clue what's been going on all that time. (There is one long thread in the Piano Teachers Forum about this).

In fact, I'd say what a good teacher needs is not just to have a good all-round knowledge of music and the piano rep (but also knowing their limitations e.g. they won't teach anything other than classical because they have no interest in other genres), and excellent people skills, but also what I'd call a 'teaching intelligence', which I define as the ability to see (potential) problems their students are experiencing early on and nip them in the bud quickly before they turn into something almost intractable. That requires observational skills, and the ability to think laterally, out of the box - what's really going on? - and then doing something different (to what you normally do in each lesson - i.e. out of your 'routine') to check out whether your 'diagnosis' was right, and if so, what needs to be done to fix it. And ensure the problem never happens again.

That's almost the equivalent of parenting skills wink , but with a slightly different kind of perceptive ability required.


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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Stubbie #2835518 04/05/19 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Stubbie
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by Stubbie
Originally Posted by keystring
[quote=Wuffski]While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

My bigger worry would be:
a) the teacher does not criticize, because then there is no growth
b) the criticism is unrealistic: i.e. not linked to skills or means that also have to be given to a student in order to reach these things.
How would you know these things from the interview?

These may be valid worries, keystring, and I know you had a bad experience, but going into the interview expecting the worst invites anxiety, disappointment, and inaction.

I honestly missed the fact that this was being asked in the context of an interview. I think I missed the point and was thinking it was a warning about lessons in general. Hm, rethinking this. So - "seriously criticize" in an interview. I guess that would not be someone who is a novice, because there would be nothing TO criticize. Therefore Wuffski is painting the scenario where you've done some learning, and for example, you're playing for the teacher.

In that case, I'd imagine the teacher would be assessing my strengths, weaknesses, and holes in my abilities. I suppose that identified weaknesses might be seen as "criticism" but I don't think that way. I'm not sure that I actually understand Wuffski's point or scenario. (?)

Quote

Where I would feel uneasy in such a scenario is if the teacher simply said "oh how wonderful" to everything, because I do hope there would be things to work on and learn. If I can already do everything well, I don't need a teacher.
I read Wiffski's "serious criticism" as the student being prepared to accept instruction without the resistance that adults sometimes feel and exhibit. Cruel criticism is something that is never acceptable, but serious criticism to me means criticism that is given with thought and insight into what I am doing. I learn from that kind of serious criticism.


Exactly this is what I wanted to point out. Stubbie translated it correctly.
Sometimes there exists a difference between having someone as a nice person around or having this person correcting you although fairly speaking out the truth. A teacher (or any other person) might be well educated as a professional and as a private person, being a nice fellow - but constanly becoming corrected by this person is still a step up, a step which should not be missed to become reconsidered.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Wuffski #2835531 04/05/19 04:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Wuffski
Sometimes there exists a difference between having someone as a nice person around or having this person correcting you although fairly speaking out the truth. A teacher (or any other person) might be well educated as a professional and as a private person, being a nice fellow - but constantly becoming corrected by this person is still a step up, a step which should not be missed to become reconsidered.

What is missing here atm is the picture of what goes on in lessons: what you are picturing; what your own lesson experiences will have been and what picture comes from that. This is important.

One poor "teaching" style is where a student plays a piece that he prepared himself in some fashion, and the teacher proceeds to list what is wrong with it. "Prepared himself" includes a piece that was assigned, teacher maybe showing how it should sound, and then you go home to "practise" it. What's wrong: poor dynamics, not expressive enough, poor timing, wrong notes, yadda yadda. That is not teaching but passes as teaching. Is that what you are picturing when you talk about this "criticism"?

In what I picture as teaching: Ok, let's divide this up for beginners, and an intermediate or previously taught/self-taught person.
- For the beginner, the teacher knows which skills she will give the student in which order roughly, shows how to go about getting those skills, chooses pieces conducive to this, and gives some guidance as to how to practise. The "criticism" then comes in terms of these guidelines. If you're told to work in sections and never front to back, and you come in petering out as you go along because you didn't work in sections, you're criticized for not doing something you are capable of doing, and maybe get shown the consequences of that. If you're told to aim for even dynamics, then you get feedback on how far you managed to reach that goal, and what you might be doing to not reach it.

- For the previously taught or self-taught intermediate/more advanced student .... It's not just that you are playing wrong notes; or poor timing; or lacking expressiveness --- but what the things are you are missing and need to get, or change, in order to solve these things. It becomes, again, guidance and collaboration. If you have been struggling on your own, then this can come as a relief. Ofc if you had a horrid first teacher who told you everything you did was the bee's knees, and you start hearing those weaknesses for the first time, it can come as a shock.

The bottom line however is something like the presence of guidance. There are a lot of people who know how to play the piano, and may even make the student feel small as she shows how much nicer her playing sounds, but if they cannot also teach, then we get a thing that is purely "criticism".

How were you picturing things along these lines? Because I don't know.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
bennevis #2835544 04/05/19 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by outo


Bashing students on the teacher's forum may not be nice, but honestly what bothers me more is to read basically entry level questions from people who already teach...cannot imagine how it would be to be taught by someone who does not know these things and has to ask on an internet forum...I think that could at least be avoided by choosing a teacher who has a degree in teaching piano. I am not a piano teacher and only an adult student but even I know these things...

Pedagogy degrees don't make teachers immune to blinkered self-deception (for want of a better term): that they are not responsible for the consequences........like the fact that the child student they've had for years still can't read music, and they did not have a clue what's been going on all that time. (There is one long thread in the Piano Teachers Forum about this).
.


Maybe so, but at least here a degree in piano pedagogy at least ensures that the teacher can read music and knows the basics in music...

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Tyrone Slothrop #2835561 04/05/19 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by Sam S
There is a good discussion in the book "The Well-Tempered Keyboard Teacher". I urge you to get that book if are interested in all topics related to teaching piano.

As a confirmed biblophile, I was scouting Amazon.com today and found the following book which will only be released in about 4 months: The Tyranny of Tradition in Piano Teaching: A Critical History of Instruction from Clementi to the Present, by Walter Ponce. Here is the Amazon.com blurb:
Quote
The strict traditions of piano teaching have remained entrenched for generations. The dominant influence of Muzio Clementi (1752-1832), the first composer-pedagogue of the instrument, brought about an explosion of autocratic instruction and bizarre teaching systems, exemplified in the mind-numbing drills of Hanon's "The Virtuoso Pianist."
These practices--considered absurd or abusive by many students--persist today at all levels of piano education. Reflecting the author's belief that learning piano is both gratifying and exasperating, this book critically examines two centuries of teaching methods and encourages instructors to do away with traditions that disconnect mental and creative skills.

Concert pianist and pedagogue, Walter Ponce received his masters and doctor degrees from the Juilliard School. He has performed around the world as soloist with symphony orchestras, in solo recitals, and in collaboration with many renowned artists. He is a distinguished professor emeritus and former director of keyboard studies at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

Some here might find this interesting smile


Now that DOES sound interesting!



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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
bennevis #2835676 04/05/19 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by bennevis

Pedagogy degrees don't make teachers immune to blinkered self-deception (for want of a better term): that they are not responsible for the consequences........like the fact that the child student they've had for years still can't read music, and they did not have a clue what's been going on all that time. (There is one long thread in the Piano Teachers Forum about this).

That was perhaps the absolute zenith of stupidity in that forum. I don't recall saying anything because I sat on my hands and said to myself:

YOU CAN'T FIX STUPID...
Quote

In fact, I'd say what a good teacher needs is not just to have a good all-round knowledge of music and the piano rep (but also knowing their limitations e.g. they won't teach anything other than classical because they have no interest in other genres), and excellent people skills, but also what I'd call a 'teaching intelligence', which I define as the ability to see (potential) problems their students are experiencing early on and nip them in the bud quickly before they turn into something almost intractable.

Yes. Could not agree more. But do you realize how rare that is? It has to be encouraged and developed, sure, but for many "teachers" it's just not there. It's like the students I have who can't hear the difference between a major and minor chord, or who hear intervals. Of course there are people whose "listening skills" have never been developed, but if you teach long enough you really do see people who are as close to "tone deaf" as you can imagine. Until you work with such people, you have no idea how exasperating it is.

There are some people who don't possess a tiny bit of "teaching intelligence", so even if they take 1000 courses and read 10,000 books, it's just not going to happen.

I see this frequently when famous musicians suddenly give "master classes", and 5 minutes in it is obvious they are clueless about how to explain anything they do so effortlessly. The ability is there to play magnificently, but they are lacking any talent in transmitting, and they misdiagnose and give horrendous "tips".

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Gary D. #2835678 04/05/19 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.
I see this frequently when famous musicians suddenly give "master classes", and 5 minutes in it is obvious they are clueless about how to explain anything they do so effortlessly. The ability is there to play magnificently, but they are lacking any talent in transmitting, and they misdiagnose and give horrendous "tips".

Something keystring has pointed a number of times, which I also believe, is that often, a pianistic technique is described by teachers or in a master class, in a way which is not one that the teacher or pianist themselves actually does.

For example, I find descriptions of using arm-weight to be like that. The actually descriptions of how to use arm weight seem to violate the laws of physics! (Not that it isn't good to use arm-weight as I am sold on that - I'm just referring to the descriptions of how it works.)


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Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
JazzyMac #2835680 04/05/19 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by JazzyMac
Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by Sam S

Which brings up another question the the OP could ask - Does the prospective teacher belong to any professional organizations and attend conferences to further their education?

Sam


Well, Sam, I don't belong to any professional organizations, and I don't attend conferences. I took one pedagogy course, required, at the age of around 21. Just pointing out that their are exceptions to every rule.

Here is my own recommendation to adults: Find someone who can do what you want to do and who is learning how to do it from a good teacher, then try taking lessons from that teacher.

I don't teach to tests. I'm not a member of anything, for my own reasons. What I do with 8 year olds, 18 year olds and 58 year olds is essentially the same.

1. You have to learn to read, otherwise you remain musically illiterate. That says, there are some pretty famous and successful illiterates, but all I have met have regretted not learning to read AND have reported failures which I believe are due to poor teaching.

2. You need scales of some kind, because all music uses them.

3. You need chords, and their names. Without this you can never play a fake book, or improvise, but you also can't break down traditional music logically making it harder to learn and memorize, if you wish
to.


That's it. Contrary to almost everything I'm reading here I find that my students, of all ages, tend to like the same music, with obvious individual differences. The biggest difference from student to student is not what they want to play but what they are ABLE to play, and how big the gap is between present reality and what they hope to eventually master.


I loathed school. Most of my students hate school. That is an immediate bond. wink


You'd like my teacher.

I also don't cancel unless I'm close to death. I fell last September, freak thing, landed on my right shoulder and broke my scapula. Up late in an ER, Xrays, right arm in a sling, told to immobilize, see a specialist the next day. Don't move. Don't work.

I was back teaching the next afternoon, did not even miss a lesson. Started doing 5 finger exercises with my RH, in the sling, within a couple days. Back running in less than a week, walking after only a couple days. Sling was not supposed to be removed for 6 weeks. I mostly had it off after a week. Told I had to see a specialist, but when I called one, the office told me they could not even seriously look at it until after a week or two, when all the swelling went down. By two weeks I had a lot of movement back and never called back. I was playing pretty normally in under a month.

I absolutely don't understand skipping lessons, as a teachers OR as a student. If you can't make it to a lesson every week, DON'T FREAKIN' START LESSONS. And if, as teacher, you can't be there for lessons, because you have all these other things to do, your head is not in the game. DON'T TEACH.

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