2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
47 members (Colin Miles, dhull100, ando, ChrisGoesPiano, Burkey, Adam Edin, Catlady, brennbaer, 11 invisible), 471 guests, and 498 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 8 of 12 1 2 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
NobleHouse #2834913 04/03/19 02:50 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 93
P
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 93
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Sam S
My first teacher joined the Music Teachers National Association and earned their Nationally Certified Teacher of Music certificate. The fact that she went to the time and expense to do that told me something about her - something that I liked, which helped me make the decision to hire her as my teacher.

Sam

All the teachers who taught me, or who I know personally, have teaching diplomas and/or music degrees.

Saying that however, there are at least three teachers in the Piano Teachers Forum who - based on their posts - I wouldn't go within 100 yards of, let alone touch with a barge pole, despite the fact that they purportedly have music qualifications/degrees and/or are members of a piano teachers association.


I must concur with you.


I tend to agree, but I don't know who the other two are.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Sam S #2834927 04/03/19 03:34 PM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
Originally Posted by Sam S
And if someone calls themselves a piano teacher, but has never heard of this book, or some similar book, and never made an effort to learn about piano pedagogy, then I would be careful about hiring them to teach piano

While that's a nice thing to have, I wouldn't necessarily rule out having a teacher who doesn't do that.

I also attend conferences and workshops regularly, but you won't believe how often I'm thinking, "Gee, how is this even close to being relevant to what I am doing?????" There are master teachers who say things I vehemently disagree with. The biggest problem, though, is that most of the time I already know the stuff being presented, or I already do it in a better way.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Pau Gasol #2834966 04/03/19 06:18 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 13,915
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 13,915
Originally Posted by Pau Gasol
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Sam S
My first teacher joined the Music Teachers National Association and earned their Nationally Certified Teacher of Music certificate. The fact that she went to the time and expense to do that told me something about her - something that I liked, which helped me make the decision to hire her as my teacher.

Sam

All the teachers who taught me, or who I know personally, have teaching diplomas and/or music degrees.

Saying that however, there are at least three teachers in the Piano Teachers Forum who - based on their posts - I wouldn't go within 100 yards of, let alone touch with a barge pole, despite the fact that they purportedly have music qualifications/degrees and/or are members of a piano teachers association.


I must concur with you.


I tend to agree, but I don't know who the other two are.

I could point you to a couple of threads in the Piano Teachers Forum, but that would be cheating...... wink


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
keystring #2834971 04/03/19 06:40 PM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,294
M
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,294
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by Morodiene

- "believes that the application of earnestness or energy will compensate for the discipline of practice "

Yes, this is an excellent book, one that I recommend to all beginner teachers. I put the last point in bold because while all of these are true for a lot of adult students, this last one is probably the most difficult to get across.


Morodiene, I think I know where you're coming from. I'm thinking of the solution to this, however. One thing is to grasp that one can actually try too hard, and this can be close to destructive. But the other, I think, is to know what to aim for, day by day, moment by moment, and then how to aim for it. Is this being taught? For example, if a student is given a piece of music, shown how it should sound, and then takes it home to "practise" so that by next week it will sound like that, does he actually know what he is aiming for? Is the teaching out there starting simple enough? Does this get turned around through a change of attitude: through guidance in what and how to do: through both? I think what you highlighted is indeed an important point.

Oh, yes, of course! But usually the advice is not taken, and so mistakes are learned and progress is not made when I have students where this applies.


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2834975 04/03/19 06:44 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 619
D
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 619
Quote
For instance, the fact that teachers can cancel appointments at any notice and rearrange a student's schedule--and it should be considered okay, whereas if a student cancels an appointment, that person has to "refer to the policy."


JazzyMac, if a studio did this often enough, most likely it would go out of business. I understand issues happen, such as family, health, etc.... I can't imagine a studio owner allowing missed lessons by faculty often. I arrange my schedule based on lessons (as I can). If they were cancel often I would seek another school or hire a private teacher. There has to be some type of guidelines, policies in place. Generally, before the person decides to take lessons the policy is given to them. If the person is not in agreement it would be best not to attend that school. The school I have been at, in 5 years about 3 lessons were missed because my teacher had symphony practice for a holiday show. Those lessons were made up at a later date. The business owner has to depend on the clients to cover expenses. That spot is booked for you., it is is vacant and not paid, the studio loses money. If this happens often enough, the business will go under. Now when that happens, it does not only impact the studio, it impacts the local community as well.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
bennevis #2834998 04/03/19 07:33 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 619
D
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 619
Bennevis, teachers have different styles. The first teacher I had, before he went into computer science was hard with not much personality. However, I learned a tremendous amount as I was pushed every lesson. Maybe because of his background, teaching at a university, playing for a sympathy, and graduating from top conservatories he was so serious. What a great education I received. By the time I invested in a piano and hours of lessons each week, my expectation is for a quality education. Now this man is probably not a teacher for everyone, however it worked for me. I want to be challenged to move forward.

Teachers come from different perspectives and teach based on different theories of learning. Those that you may not want, just may be perfect for someone else. The teacher I have now makes me count out loud if I start messing up. Counting out loud for 2 hours is not the easiest thing to do, but my counting has really improved. Plus I am really motivated to count right! I do not view education as something that is easy.

I used to teach online adjunct at a university. I had students complain I was too hard. I spoke with a social worker friend and said can you imagine that (I did not see myself that way) she said yes because you are a perfectionist. I had students complain about me. However, I have lead several employees that I mentor to publish in peer reviewed journals, publishing is not for the weak at heart (referring to reviewers comments). There truly is a teacher for everyone. What does not work for one may work for another.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Pau Gasol #2835001 04/03/19 07:42 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,918
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,918
Originally Posted by Pau Gasol
Originally Posted by NobleHouse
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Sam S
My first teacher joined the Music Teachers National Association and earned their Nationally Certified Teacher of Music certificate. The fact that she went to the time and expense to do that told me something about her - something that I liked, which helped me make the decision to hire her as my teacher.

Sam

All the teachers who taught me, or who I know personally, have teaching diplomas and/or music degrees.

Saying that however, there are at least three teachers in the Piano Teachers Forum who - based on their posts - I wouldn't go within 100 yards of, let alone touch with a barge pole, despite the fact that they purportedly have music qualifications/degrees and/or are members of a piano teachers association.


I must concur with you.


I tend to agree, but I don't know who the other two are.


Pau, you may be new, but I love you already!


Learner
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Tech-key #2835002 04/03/19 07:43 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 619
D
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 619
Quote
Many of his reviews were surrounded around his personality and an ability to keep students motivated.


I see this often regarding the teacher keeping the student motivated. Referring to adult students, I am not clear on why the teacher has to keep the adult motivated. I believe adults should be self-motivated. I pay a lot to go to lessons, that is motivating. If I were not motivated I would not take lessons. I do not expect my teacher to motivate me. The adult learner should be motivated by moving toward their goal (whatever that may be) and seeing themselves progress.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
DFSRN #2835021 04/03/19 09:05 PM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,294
M
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,294
Originally Posted by DFSRN
Quote
Many of his reviews were surrounded around his personality and an ability to keep students motivated.


I see this often regarding the teacher keeping the student motivated. Referring to adult students, I am not clear on why the teacher has to keep the adult motivated. I believe adults should be self-motivated. I pay a lot to go to lessons, that is motivating. If I were not motivated I would not take lessons. I do not expect my teacher to motivate me. The adult learner should be motivated by moving toward their goal (whatever that may be) and seeing themselves progress.

I agree. Progress is the most motivating thing, but there's only so much a teacher can do to help that progress. The rest is up to the student to make it happen.


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835038 04/03/19 10:37 PM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 288
M
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 288
Really interesting ideas here.

I found my teacher by chance, but with an extended period to observe his teaching style as he tutored my kids in math, so we both kind of went in with a good sense of what the other was bringing to the deal. The approach was a good fit - a working partnership in which he brings the knowledge and I bring the questions. 6 years later, I'm making progress - not as much as I could have done if I had internalized the practice strategies earlier, and tackled scales and arpeggios earlier rather than waiting for Mozart to show me that I couldn't put it off any longer. Did I mention that my teacher is very patient - doesn't get hot and bothered if I haven't done it right, but also reminds me that we did indeed discuss, for example, using the metronome.....

But none-the-less, each lesson is a chance to ask questions, work through problems, and increasingly work through questions of interpretation. I look forward to it each week, and I find it pretty easy to get to the piano each day and find something new.

I see it as a matter of balance, just like any other working relationship. The most important tool is honest communication - both with yourself and with your teacher. If you are practicing, you know it, and you can communicate it, both in what you can demonstrate well and in what you can demonstrate the other way. If you are honest with your teacher about what you want to accomplish or experience, and listen to the teacher's honest opinion about how you can do that, you have the inputs to move yourself forward.

I hope, though, as a reformed sinner, I know there's the reality of "didn't practice this week....again" - that the children and teenagers who are "in lessons" are learning about that balance and working relationship as a side-benefit of the time they are spending.

Thinking of or relating to the teacher as either an all-knowing god or a servant - not that any of us would, but hypothetically speaking - doesn't sound like an easy road to good communication. POssible, but not easy. And I don't think that's a difference between adults and children, by the way. My best teachers - early, middle and grownup - are / were the ones who coached you to be able to do it yourself - leading by example and two-way dialog as we diagnosed problems and thought up solutions. Did you have to learn the standards and skills - sure. But your reasons for doing that were your own, not the teacher's.

So, to the question of "what to ask" - I would come in with a clear idea of how I learn best, and ask the teacher how he/she thinks students learn best, and see if there is a match. I personally don't put a lot of weight on qualifications, but I wouldn't ignore them if they were important to me, or if there wasn't a lot of personal knowledge to go on. Same thing with online reviews - read them, but with a grain of salt, since one person's great teacher might be someone else's bad fit, and the reviews in my neck of the woods tend to skew negative. I also wonder if, in the absence of first-hand knowledge, it might be easiest to start in a more formal setting - a multi-teacher school, perhaps - so that if there is not a match, it will be easier to disengage.


Mason & Hamlin A ('97)
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835050 04/03/19 11:29 PM
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 346
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 346
That might have been said, but degrees and experience are not a guarantee that it will be a good teacher or a good fit.

I've got 3 teachers. All of them had little to no experience.
I had fun with the first one, but his lack of experience cause a bit of damage.
The second one maybe was good, but it wasn't a good fit. I felt I was leaving lessons with so little advice and things to work on.
The third one, I love him. I really feel like he is making me progress, that he has a lot of advice and usually finds the right balance between being motivating and being demanding. And I've learnt recently (last Sunday to be exact) that I'm his only student. I don't know if he had any other ones before me. I'm contemplating the idea of taking lessons with another teacher only for the Summer just to make sure there isn't anything wrong that I can't notice by myself.

All of them had some degrees (Bachelor or Master in piano interpretation)

What my little experience told me is that it is important that your teacher is aware of your goals and that he/she is willing to help you going toward them.

For the rest, I think it is hard to judge. If the teacher has some experience, talking to former or actual students might be interesting.

First impression or first lessons can not be a good indicator. I must admit I cried after my first lesson with my current teacher. And the first few (2-4) weeks felt a bit awkward because my teacher seemed a little bit shy at first (now he's not anymore) and I was feeling a bit... intimidated in a way? I'm always a bit stressed to play in front of a new teacher, but it mostly goes over after little time.

Good luck in your researches! smile


My piano journey from day 1
Started piano on February 2016.
Pieces I'm working on :
- Rameau, Les Sauvages
- Mozart, K545, 1st mov
- Chopin, nocturne op. posth. in C# minor
- Debussy, Golliwog's cakewalk
- Pozzoli, E.R. 427, etude no. 6
Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Morodiene #2835108 04/04/19 04:10 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,155
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,155
Originally Posted by Morodiene
Oh, yes, of course! But usually the advice is not taken, and so mistakes are learned and progress is not made when I have students where this applies.

We are on the same merry-go-round, riding different horses. You're writing from the perspective of a teacher who gives students how to work on a piece of music, with feasible and necessary tasks and subtasks, order of working etc. Your challenge, then, is for the student actually do what you've instructed, so that the thing has a chance of working.

I'm writing from the perspective of finding that teacher in the first place, either from the view of a student who is already willing to work that way provided the instructions are forthcoming; or a student who has to be guided in that direction, but obvious first needs that guidance.

What can happen/often happens is that the student is given music and perhaps more advanced than what a child will get, and with more abstract and musical-oriented instruction, and the student then has at it somehow at home. This first guidance we're talking about doesn't happen. If the student played another instrument (which may or may not have been properly taught), or dabbled in learning on their own first, or was "taught" rather than taught piano earlier, the risk goes up massively that this student will not be guided in these things.

You get a scenario where, for example, a beginner gets a piece that is still deemed "simple" - say a Petzold Minuet or Gavotte - is shown how it sounds; is shown how you want this or that brought out in the music, and then the beginner goes home trying to do achieve this end result. He works extremely hard, long hours. It is even worse if the student actually ends up playing it "how it sounds" by having done the wrong things. You'll know what I mean so I don't have to explain it.

When we come to this particular attribute in the list, a thing to preempt and solve this, is to teach a student how to work toward skills; give those skills to work toward, etc. Often this is not done at all. I know that you do it. If in a pedagogy course that is not made clear, and if students are simply given a list of student attitudes and fears, then something may be missing. When I was an adult student with earlier teachers this was missing, and those teachers tried way too hard to focus on the emotional side when what I wanted were the skills.

I hope this makes some sense.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Medved1 #2835121 04/04/19 05:04 AM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 54
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 54
Originally Posted by Medved1



So, to the question of "what to ask" - I would come in with a clear idea of how I learn best, and ask the teacher how he/she thinks students learn best, and see if there is a match. I personally don't put a lot of weight on qualifications, but I wouldn't ignore them if they were important to me, or if there wasn't a lot of personal knowledge to go on. Same thing with online reviews - read them, but with a grain of salt, since one person's great teacher might be someone else's bad fit, and the reviews in my neck of the woods tend to skew negative. I also wonder if, in the absence of first-hand knowledge, it might be easiest to start in a more formal setting - a multi-teacher school, perhaps - so that if there is not a match, it will be easier to disengage.


Very good thank you.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
CadenzaVvi #2835122 04/04/19 05:06 AM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 54
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 54
Originally Posted by CadenzaVvi


For the rest, I think it is hard to judge. If the teacher has some experience, talking to former or actual students might be interesting.

First impression or first lessons can not be a good indicator. I must admit I cried after my first lesson with my current teacher. And the first few (2-4) weeks felt a bit awkward because my teacher seemed a little bit shy at first (now he's not anymore) and I was feeling a bit... intimidated in a way? I'm always a bit stressed to play in front of a new teacher, but it mostly goes over after little time.

Good luck in your researches! smile


Also, very good advice. Thank you.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835157 04/04/19 06:41 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 558
W
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 558
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Wuffski #2835166 04/04/19 07:29 AM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 54
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 54
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

I was a songwriter in Nashville for 17 years. I have a hide like an alligator.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
stevechris #2835175 04/04/19 08:14 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,973
K
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
K
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,973
Originally Posted by stevechris
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

I was a songwriter in Nashville for 17 years. I have a hide like an alligator.


I don't have a hide like an alligator. My teacher always seems very impressed with the progress I make each week and I have no idea really about whether it is justified or not.

But then goes on to, I think you need to change what you are doing here, there and everywhere, well not quite but I think you know what I mean. What she points out is always focussed on what I can do to improve how I play the piece, how my technique might be letting me down on a particular section and what I should do to change things. I've never felt like she brings me down, but she is focussed on what I need to do better and makes recommendations on what I need to change to do better.

Honestly I think this is one of the hallmarks of a good teacher, someone who can provide direction to a student who listens without killing them with negativity about their playing.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Wuffski #2835196 04/04/19 08:59 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,155
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,155
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

My bigger worry would be:
a) the teacher does not criticize, because then there is no growth
b) the criticism is unrealistic: i.e. not linked to skills or means that also have to be given to a student in order to reach these things.

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
keystring #2835216 04/04/19 09:43 AM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,795
Gold Subscriber
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,795
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

My bigger worry would be:
a) the teacher does not criticize, because then there is no growth
b) the criticism is unrealistic: i.e. not linked to skills or means that also have to be given to a student in order to reach these things.
How would you know these things from the interview?

These may be valid worries, keystring, and I know you had a bad experience, but going into the interview expecting the worst invites anxiety, disappointment, and inaction.


[Linked Image]
Yamaha C3X
In summer, the song sings itself. --William Carlos Williams

Re: What to ask when interviewing a teacher?
Stubbie #2835221 04/04/19 09:55 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,155
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,155
Originally Posted by Stubbie
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by Wuffski
While the original question was "What to ask when interviewing a teacher?", I would like to remind you on also asking to yourself "Will I accept this person to seriously criticize me?".

My bigger worry would be:
a) the teacher does not criticize, because then there is no growth
b) the criticism is unrealistic: i.e. not linked to skills or means that also have to be given to a student in order to reach these things.
How would you know these things from the interview?

These may be valid worries, keystring, and I know you had a bad experience, but going into the interview expecting the worst invites anxiety, disappointment, and inaction.

I honestly missed the fact that this was being asked in the context of an interview. I think I missed the point and was thinking it was a warning about lessons in general. Hm, rethinking this. So - "seriously criticize" in an interview. I guess that would not be someone who is a novice, because there would be nothing TO criticize. Therefore Wuffski is painting the scenario where you've done some learning, and for example, you're playing for the teacher.

In that case, I'd imagine the teacher would be assessing my strengths, weaknesses, and holes in my abilities. I suppose that identified weaknesses might be seen as "criticism" but I don't think that way. I'm not sure that I actually understand Wuffski's point or scenario. (?)

Where I would feel uneasy in such a scenario is if the teacher simply said "oh how wonderful" to everything, because I do hope there would be things to work on and learn. If I can already do everything well, I don't need a teacher.

Page 8 of 12 1 2 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
(ad) SWEETWATER Cyber Sale
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Best Headphones for Digital Piano - your experience
by lukasz-zsakul - 12/04/20 05:10 AM
Is the Hailun 218 solid spruce?
by Sonepica - 12/04/20 04:55 AM
Schiff talked about Bartók's style of playing
by symphonicdance - 12/04/20 01:46 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics203,253
Posts3,030,345
Members99,467
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4