2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Spring Into Sound Sale
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
54 members (Bill McKaig,RPT, anotherscott, Carey, AndyOnThePiano, David B, chopinetto, camperbc, dorfmouse, 10 invisible), 446 guests, and 352 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 5 of 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11 12
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 638
D
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 638
Dr. Rodgers, after two and a half years of music theory (2 hours a week) with a master's prepared teacher who also taught adjunct at a university and played for the symphony he left teaching to pursue computer engineering. I had contacted another school for just music theory with a teacher who had a PhD in music theory and composition. The school said there was an opening, but the teacher said he did not have one. The music owner at the school I attend told me, what that meant, your too hard of a student. He would have to prepare for you due to your level. I had finished with fugue and sonata form analysis before my teacher left. She said I could teach you, but that would be a lot of preparation. Basically your too much work. I really never thought of it that way.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 638
D
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 638
Bennevis, I totally agree, that's why we pay for lessons to learn, there is no room for egos. The adult learner needs to maybe learn how to take the role of the student. It could be an adult is not used to the school type environments and it may be hard to adjust. I have been in school most of my life and work in education at the Veterans Affairs. Taking the role of a student is not a issue for me, because of my academic experiences. Most of my friends around my age have not been in school for 30 or more years, it probably would be an adjustment for them to be in a student role.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,309
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,309
I have tried to post the same idea several time, and each time it gets drowned out by the same canard about the stereotypical supposed adult student who doesn't listen to the good teacher, wants to rush ahead,yadda yadda, and for heavens sake just do exactly what your teacher tells you to do and everything will be hunky dorey. Which also has merit where pertinent.

There is the phenomenon which is not that rare where teachers rush an adult student ahead, do not give enough groundwork in fundamentals for long enough, or even skip a lot of it entirely because it's assumed they have it or don't need it - get too intellectual. If you religiously follow someone who is not giving you foundations, through wrong assumptions or ignorance, you will follow yourself straight into eventual trouble. One reason this happens is because the "advice" is given in some quarters that adults want to be rushed forward, be given shortcuts, and therefore a teacher should. In other cases - I've given the example of a trumpeter who is expected to know how his hands work at the piano when his work has been with breath and embouchure.

What I'm trying to stress is that it may be necessary to tell a prospective teacher that you want to be given the skills for playing the piano / music at the piano, you are willing to do the work, and then make sure (when you find a teacher who teaches toward that), that you do do the work. You cannot assume that the teaching will be toward that. I used to think that my first experience was isolated, but it isn't. Those who have experience in another instrument, or who first played piano self-taught to any degree are the most at risk of not getting adequate foundations.

Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand
I think I get what JazzyMac is saying. I only accidentally stumbled into the Teachers’ Forum once and was so put off I never ventured back in there. The way some teachers were talking about adults in that forum made it seem like they think adult students are idiots PERIOD. The arrogance was incredible.

I know the thread you are talking about. I don't sense any arrogance in there.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,309
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 18,309
What about what I just wrote about? (Rather than this getting diverted once again by emotional things).

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 374
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 374
Originally Posted by keystring
What I'm trying to stress is that it may be necessary to tell a prospective teacher that you want to be given the skills for playing the piano / music at the piano, you are willing to do the work, and then make sure (when you find a teacher who teaches toward that), that you do do the work. You cannot assume that the teaching will be toward that. I used to think that my first experience was isolated, but it isn't. Those who have experience in another instrument, or who first played piano self-taught to any degree are the most at risk of not getting adequate foundations.


That's precisely what I told my teacher when I started lessons: that I wanted to learn in a formal and rigorous manner, and to do the ABRSM exams as a way of measuring my progress. As a life-long learner I've always had the view that it's pointless to try to build on shaky foundations.


Chris

Yamaha P-515, Yamaha Reface CP.
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,949
Originally Posted by keystring
What about what I just wrote about? (Rather than this getting diverted once again by emotional things).

You are always the voice of reason, but I'm afraid that some people's mind is already made-up.

That bit on "adequate foundations" speaks volumes. Even as a teacher, I sometimes have to tell myself to SLOW DOWN as I teach seemingly intelligent students who are learning almost effortlessly. It is very easy to move too quickly through the material, to get into the "coverage" game, and get the students out of method books by level 2B in 6 months of lessons--the temptation of playing "real" music is just too much.

It is indeed a trap, for both the student and the teacher.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 79
R
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
R
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 79
Originally Posted by Cheshire Chris

I wouldn't personally want an "online" teacher. I think you get so much more out of face-to-face teaching, and it's far easier for the teacher to correct poor technique.



I have to offer an alternative view on this…

My online teacher is always able to correct my technique: she can tell me when my thumb is ever so slightly not in the right place, always notices when my wrist is not quite held properly, and has given me invaluable advice on good posture and avoiding playing with tension. And so much more.

Meanwhile, the in-person teacher I had for a while never taught me anything, never explained what good posture is or even how to use one's hands. It took him four lessons to even tell me that I was sitting in the wrong place (I wasn't sitting in front of middle C).

So, as far as I can tell, a good teacher is a good teacher, whether online or in person. A bad teacher is a bad teacher, whether online or in person. I have personally met two excellent online teachers (including the teacher I am currently happily learning with) and a poor in-person teacher. I believe that this idea that in-person teaching is so much better than online teaching is mainly perpetuated by students who have not found a good online teacher, or sometimes perhaps have never even tried to learn that way due to all the cliches surrounding online learning. And the myth perpetuates itself…

I'll be forever grateful for people on this forum who advised me to give it a try, for sure.

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 374
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 374
Originally Posted by RosemaryGirl

So, as far as I can tell, a good teacher is a good teacher, whether online or in person. A bad teacher is a bad teacher, whether online or in person.


Very true. I wasn't thinking of the quality of the teaching, but more of the technical aspects of having an online lesson, Rosemary. If you're having a lesson via Skype (or however it is you do it), you need to set up the camera in just the right place to allow the teacher to see all the aspects of your playing, and that's not necessarily easy for someone to do. It's just so much easier to get that kind of thing corrected when you're with a teacher in person.


Chris

Yamaha P-515, Yamaha Reface CP.
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 417
K
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
K
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 417
Originally Posted by keystring
There is the phenomenon which is not that rare where teachers rush an adult student ahead, do not give enough groundwork in fundamentals for long enough, or even skip a lot of it entirely because it's assumed they have it or don't need it - get too intellectual. If you religiously follow someone who is not giving you foundations, through wrong assumptions or ignorance, you will follow yourself straight into eventual trouble. One reason this happens is because the "advice" is given in some quarters that adults want to be rushed forward, be given shortcuts, and therefore a teacher should. In other cases - I've given the example of a trumpeter who is expected to know how his hands work at the piano when his work has been with breath and embouchure.

This is something I notice a lot on Reddit, where I'm a bit more active than I am here. So many teachers who assign their students of a few months Intermediate+ material, it's mind-boggling. At the same time, these students most of the time don't seem open to suggestions that contradict their teachers, which may have something to do with the student's mindset (and the reason why their teacher recommends it, is because that's what the student wants to play) or with the student's inability to comprehend that their teacher may indeed be rushing the student ahead.

Incidentally, the advice that both you and Morodienne gave me nearly two years ago has been instrumental to my own development as a piano player. It helped that my teacher whole-heartedly agreed with the approach you suggested. Which, perhaps, comes back to the average PW member not being the average adult piano student in terms of being willing to listen to the advice of others and being willing to think about it instead of immediately brushing it aside because it doesn't fit their prefered narrative.


I've started playing January 2017, Nothing is too easy is where I keep track of my progress.

[Linked Image]
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,434
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,434
Originally Posted by Cheshire Chris
Originally Posted by keystring
What I'm trying to stress is that it may be necessary to tell a prospective teacher that you want to be given the skills for playing the piano / music at the piano, you are willing to do the work, and then make sure (when you find a teacher who teaches toward that), that you do do the work. You cannot assume that the teaching will be toward that. I used to think that my first experience was isolated, but it isn't. Those who have experience in another instrument, or who first played piano self-taught to any degree are the most at risk of not getting adequate foundations.


That's precisely what I told my teacher when I started lessons: that I wanted to learn in a formal and rigorous manner, and to do the ABRSM exams as a way of measuring my progress. As a life-long learner I've always had the view that it's pointless to try to build on shaky foundations.

A good teacher will do just that - if the adult beginner requests it.

Unfortunately, it seems most adult students want to 'progress' as quickly as possible, regardless. There are posts in ABF on a regular basis - including by regular posters - which tell the truth. If one app doesn't seem to help, try another. People don't seem to realise that knowing something doesn't mean you can actually do it. (I know exactly how Federer plays his shots - I watch him all the time in slow motion. But I just can't do what he does, not even close.) The "adult" beginner books perpetuate that too. And of course, if the teacher doesn't deliver what the student expects, he'll go elsewhere. (There are posts here all the time about this too). So - why not just let the student learn Für Elise from day 1, if that's what he wants, even if he doesn't know where middle C is?

My adult beginner friend told me about his first lesson with his teacher, who specialises in teaching adults. Yep, he got completely lost trying to play three notes at the same time, both hands at the same time (one of them a chord), trying to keep time without counting beats aloud......you get the picture. Luckily for him, thing resolved immediately when he told his teacher that he really, really, really did want to start from the beginning, with the basics, and skipping nothing, and he wasn't in a rush, and wanted to follow the ABRSM syllabus and do the exams. (Guess what: his teacher saw the racks and racks of classical CDs - most of them of piano music - and the volumes of books about composers in his home, and assumed he already knew a lot. Yes, he did - but not about actual piano playing.)

His teacher told him that he was unique among adult beginners, one who wanted to learn all the basics properly first, and didn't want to rush, and wanted to follow the ABRSM syllabus and do the exams - like all his child students.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,642
W
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,642
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand
I think I get what JazzyMac is saying. I only accidentally stumbled into the Teachers’ Forum once and was so put off I never ventured back in there. The way some teachers were talking about adults in that forum made it seem like they think adult students are idiots PERIOD. The arrogance was incredible.

I know the thread you are talking about. I don't sense any arrogance in there.


I don't know how to respond to this but I guess we can agree to disagree. If you read the posts in this thread, I am not the only poster who feels this way, so...you (a teacher) not acknowledging it doesn't mean we adult students didn't feel it. Maybe that's where the problem lies - some teachers are not able to see and understand through their adult student's point of view, and therefore, a disconnect results.

Perhaps, we could just leave it at that. I really don't want to be starting an argument with anyone.

As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy; plus an adults' only recital of sorts; plus an opportunity to play on a Bosendorfer grand; plus...I'm going to stop now before I jinx myself.

As people live longer, retirement years will become longer. Mature adults are being encouraged to stay active and they have a lot of cash to spend. I think this is a market that will grow and I think the industry should recognize this and embrace it.

Last edited by WeakLeftHand; 04/02/19 10:05 AM.

Kawai K-500
Casio PX-735 (in retirement)
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 295
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 295
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand


As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy; plus an adults' only recital of sorts; plus an opportunity to play on a Bosendorfer grand; plus...I'm going to stop now before I jinx myself.


There is a piano teacher at the conservatory here who specializes in andragogy! They are out there.

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,434
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 14,434
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand

As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy

Personally, I'd be wary of a teacher who offers all that immediately - "low expectations", "teach him what he wants to learn and give him what he wants, don't worry about anything else", "he won't last long, just like most of the others" - those phrases come to mind immediately.

Almost certainly, that teacher won't offer that to a child student. Or a serious student. Assuming you are serious (read my previous post), check things out and thread carefully......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
G
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
G
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
Originally Posted by JazzyMac


This is exactly my point. Just because a teacher is an expert in piano, does not mean he or she is an expert in ANY other subject, but to hear the Teacher's forum tell it, Adults are just plain idiots that woke up under a rock yesterday. Not certain how I can get the point across, but I know this is why I take long hiatuses from the forums.

I'm going to jump on this because nothing is happening in the Teacher Forum, and maybe the reason is HERE, not THERE.

I have been very close to leaving Piano World totally because of the crap that goes on there. I really hate it.

I think you are talking about a particular kind of arrogance that I do see, the idea that an adult (teaching or not) thinks he is superior to others on the basis of ability and accomplishments in one area. In other words, because I know a lot about music (and I do, by the way) should give me no reason to cop an attitude that suggests or "leaks" an inner view that I'm superior to you or someone else because of my ability in this one area.

To be honest, I spend way more time bashing teachers than students. I'm pretty much a lone wolf, quietly doing my own thing and resisting most of what I see other teachers doing.

Last edited by Gary D.; 04/02/19 10:52 AM.
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,298
M
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 17,298
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand
I think I get what JazzyMac is saying. I only accidentally stumbled into the Teachers’ Forum once and was so put off I never ventured back in there. The way some teachers were talking about adults in that forum made it seem like they think adult students are idiots PERIOD. The arrogance was incredible.

I know the thread you are talking about. I don't sense any arrogance in there.


I don't know how to respond to this but I guess we can agree to disagree. If you read the posts in this thread, I am not the only poster who feels this way, so...you (a teacher) not acknowledging it doesn't mean we adult students didn't feel it. Maybe that's where the problem lies - some teachers are not able to see and understand through their adult student's point of view, and therefore, a disconnect results.

Perhaps, we could just leave it at that. I really don't want to be starting an argument with anyone.

As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy; plus an adults' only recital of sorts; plus an opportunity to play on a Bosendorfer grand; plus...I'm going to stop now before I jinx myself.

As people live longer, retirement years will become longer. Mature adults are being encouraged to stay active and they have a lot of cash to spend. I think this is a market that will grow and I think the industry should recognize this and embrace it.

Only if their personality and skills allow for that. There are teacher who only teach beginners, for example, and when those students get into intermediate, they recommend them on to another teacher.

As a business owner, I can choose to run my business as I see fit. There are students I won't take because I know off the bat out personalities will clash, or they want something I don't offer. Should I take them on just because I'm "not with the times" to offer pop music lessons? Why would this be any different for teaching adult students? If a teacher does not do well teaching adults, it's best they recognize that limitation and not teach for the sake of making more money.


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
G
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
G
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
Originally Posted by Peter K. Mose

Lefty, I concur 100% with Morodiene's post and your praise of it. But regrettably, Toronto is a lousy city for finding worthy piano teachers for the adult learner, and it is precisely due to the popularity of the Royal Conservatory, and its stranglehold even on independent studio teaching. The entire RCM mindset fights against progressive piano learning.

Peter, there has been a war going on between the establishment and more progressive thinking as far back in history as you want to go. From my point of view it's good to go back at least to Chopin, because in his time there was already a battle going on between people who were trying to free up the hands and use motion very much like people like Taubman, Chopin's group, and others who were promoting a "still hand". This "still hand" crap is right now ruining people's bodies.

I would not center my arguments on RCM or lack of it. The problem goes way deeper. Essentially we have things that work, then we have theories about what very close-minded people THINK should work. I'm not sure what you mean by "progressive piano learning", but just remember that Chopin was fighting the same battle against teachers like Kalkbrenner. Kalkbrenner had such a humongous ego that he thought Chopin could benefit from studying with him, when today we know that Chopin's ideas re technique have not been fully absorbed or understood RIGHT UP TO THIS VERY MOMENT.

Last edited by Gary D.; 04/02/19 11:03 AM.
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,642
W
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,642
Originally Posted by TomInCinci
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand


As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy; plus an adults' only recital of sorts; plus an opportunity to play on a Bosendorfer grand; plus...I'm going to stop now before I jinx myself.


There is a piano teacher at the conservatory here who specializes in andragogy! They are out there.


Funny you mention it because I only learned of that word literally yesterday reading a Teacher's Association magazine! LOL. I'm learning. If only I can find that magazine again, I will post it here.

Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand

As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy

Personally, I'd be wary of a teacher who offers all that immediately - "low expectations", "teach him what he wants to learn and give him what he wants, don't worry about anything else", "he won't last long, just like most of the others" - those phrases come to mind immediately.

Almost certainly, that teacher won't offer that to a child student. Or a serious student. Assuming you are serious (read my previous post), check things out and thread carefully......


I do see your point, and I am cautious of that mentality. That is why at our first lesson, I will be discussing with her my desire to attempt RCM exams, from the beginning or whichever level she suggests. I think that she will be able to understand what I am looking for after that first lesson. I'm not your average adult piano student (if there is such a thing as "average") and I think she will get to know that very quickly.

I think she offers that kind of flexibility because she has a good group of adult students (or at least a sufficient number of them), and she knows what those adults are looking for. Flexibility in scheduling is my top priority due to my full-time work schedule. I think that is the top priority for adults who are not yet retired. At least that's how I see it. Again, it might be all smoke and mirrors but I will know better after my first lesson.


Last edited by WeakLeftHand; 04/02/19 11:06 AM.

Kawai K-500
Casio PX-735 (in retirement)
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 9,824
9000 Post Club Member
Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 9,824
Originally Posted by Keselo
At the same time, these students most of the time don't seem open to suggestions that contradict their teachers, which may have something to do with the student's mindset (and the reason why their teacher recommends it, is because that's what the student wants to play) or with the student's inability to comprehend that their teacher may indeed be rushing the student ahead.

At the same time, the teacher is the teacher and the student is the student. I think it is always good to take responsibility for one's learning by expressing what one would be interested in learning and the sorts of learning elements one would be interested in, the repertoire, etc., but if one defines everything, then it is the equivalent of setting the curriculum/syllabus. Making sure the teacher is on the same page as the student is best done at the outset before lessons begin. After lessons start, I think the student needs to express their interests and willingness and ability to do, and give feedback on what they like and don't like so the teacher can make in-flight course corrections. But if you set the agenda and the curriculum/syllabus for one's teacher, then I don't think that the learning is proceeding in the proper fashion.

What I've seen is people posting that say, stuff to the effect of, "wow, my not doing so well. my teacher gives me pieces that are really hard. is this normal?" and stuff like that. If that happens, then I think it is perfectly ok for the student to say exactly this to their teacher instead of posting on Reddit about it. But I think if you "contradict" your teacher too much, then you might as well be teaching yourself.


[Linked Image]
across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,642
W
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,642
Originally Posted by Morodiene
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by WeakLeftHand
I think I get what JazzyMac is saying. I only accidentally stumbled into the Teachers’ Forum once and was so put off I never ventured back in there. The way some teachers were talking about adults in that forum made it seem like they think adult students are idiots PERIOD. The arrogance was incredible.

I know the thread you are talking about. I don't sense any arrogance in there.


I don't know how to respond to this but I guess we can agree to disagree. If you read the posts in this thread, I am not the only poster who feels this way, so...you (a teacher) not acknowledging it doesn't mean we adult students didn't feel it. Maybe that's where the problem lies - some teachers are not able to see and understand through their adult student's point of view, and therefore, a disconnect results.

Perhaps, we could just leave it at that. I really don't want to be starting an argument with anyone.

As an aside, I was originally very wary (after reading some negative views here) about finding a teacher that would truly welcome adult students and is flexible enough to accept all of our "challenges". I think I lucked out and might have found one, but we're still in the early stages yet. I did not even ask but was offered weekly, biweekly or occasional lessons off the bat; plus a very flexible cancellation/rescheduling policy; plus an adults' only recital of sorts; plus an opportunity to play on a Bosendorfer grand; plus...I'm going to stop now before I jinx myself.

As people live longer, retirement years will become longer. Mature adults are being encouraged to stay active and they have a lot of cash to spend. I think this is a market that will grow and I think the industry should recognize this and embrace it.

Only if their personality and skills allow for that. There are teacher who only teach beginners, for example, and when those students get into intermediate, they recommend them on to another teacher.

As a business owner, I can choose to run my business as I see fit. There are students I won't take because I know off the bat out personalities will clash, or they want something I don't offer. Should I take them on just because I'm "not with the times" to offer pop music lessons? Why would this be any different for teaching adult students? If a teacher does not do well teaching adults, it's best they recognize that limitation and not teach for the sake of making more money.


Morodiene, I don't disagree with you. I just think that if you are going to take adult piano students, don't complain about them online. Very bad form, bad for business and bad for the industry as a whole.

I'm not suggesting that EVERYONE should take adults, because you need to have a certain set of skills to do so successfully, as you've said. And I do agree that teaching adults is more challenging than teaching children. However, I do think that it's an untapped market, and if I was a piano teacher that wanted to carve out my own niche...I might decide to "specialize" in teaching adults.

Last edited by WeakLeftHand; 04/02/19 11:16 AM.

Kawai K-500
Casio PX-735 (in retirement)
Page 5 of 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11 12

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Couch to Concert Hall
Couch to Concert Hall
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
[Poll] Which exercise book do you do and why?
by meghdad - 04/11/21 10:23 AM
Recording Acoustic Piano
by JeffM123 - 04/11/21 10:14 AM
Budget Stage/portable Piano
by Amy H - 04/11/21 09:11 AM
1990 Bosendorfer 130 upright
by Martin Solo - 04/11/21 06:29 AM
Qualities Required for Piano
by Qazsedcft - 04/11/21 02:25 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics206,218
Posts3,081,065
Members101,150
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5