Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
107 registered members (anotherscott, AndyOnThePiano, Bruce In Philly, Boboulus, Bill McKaig,RPT, accordeur, 24 invisible), 1,055 guests, and 502 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Re: CLP-645 - your touch sensitivity setting? [Re: Darkwasp] #2827061 03/15/19 05:36 AM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 515
J
jamiecw Offline
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
J
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 515
Originally Posted by Darkwasp

I'm starting to wonder why DPs even allow to change touch sensitivity because you can already adjust volume level if it sounds too quiet or too loud.


Because the digital technology afforded to digital pianos have one advantage acoustic pianos do not (at least until the ones that came with the silent option on them) and that is versatility.

DP vs Acoustic Pianos

DP: Don't like the volume being too loud? Presto, sound volume knob to your hearts content vs Acoustic: hard luck play with the una corda then.

DP: Don't want to press too hard to play loud or want to press normal and get a soft low sound? Change velocity settings vs Acoustic: hard cheese, work on your technique.

DP: Want to change the tuning? Here you go, alter it to your hearts content vs Acoustic: are you a tuner? No! Better get that wallet out then...

Etc...etc...etc..

(ad) SWEETWATER Lowest Prices
Re: CLP-645 - your touch sensitivity setting? [Re: Darkwasp] #2827080 03/15/19 07:25 AM
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 219
P
pianomike Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 219
My Dexibell S3 has velocity curve settings that you can adjust but I just keep it where its at .

Re: CLP-645 - your touch sensitivity setting? [Re: Darkwasp] #2827096 03/15/19 08:39 AM
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 2,318
JoBert Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 2,318
Originally Posted by Darkwasp
I'm starting to wonder why DPs even allow to change touch sensitivity because you can already adjust volume level if it sounds too quiet or too loud.

There are two different things involved, therefore there are two ways to control these two different things:

The first thing is the actual volume, which you control with the (you guessed it) volume knob/slider. A good baseline for this is the following:
Try to get some experience playing on an acoustic piano (different ones, preferably - maybe in a shop or so) and get a feeling for how loud the piano is when you play with low force, medium force and strong force.
No adjust your DP volume to be about the same (it doesn't have to be exact, different acoustics also have different volumes).

So now you have a DP that sounds about as "loud" as an acoustic when you play with low/medium/strong force.
That was step 1.

However, there is now also the quality of the tone, the timbre.

If you check this on an acoustic, you will notice that (unless the acoustic is totally clapped out), when you play pp/p the piano is not only quieter, but also more mellow than at mf. And if you play f/ff, it is not only louder, but also more harsh.
So the range from pp to ff not only changes the volume from quiet to loud, it also changes the tone from mellow to harsh.

Now compare this with your digital. A good digital these days should also have such a timbre change from pp to ff (at least somewhat). Does this sound natural to you? Does the pp/p sound suitably mellow and f/ff suitably harsh?
If yes, then you are all set.

But what if not? Then it's time to change the touch settings. If the piano does not sound mellow enough at pp but too harsh at ff, then you need to shift the touch in the direction of hard. This moves the whole dynamic range down a bit, towards the mellow pp end. Or if the piano sounds too mellow at pp and not harsh enough at ff, then you need to shift the touch in the direction of light. This moves the whole dynamic range upwards a bit, towards the harsh ff end.
That was step 2.

Now, if you actually changed the touch setting and moved the dynamic range, then of course you did not only shift the timbre, but also the volume. If you shifted towards hard, then playing with the same force as before will now produce a slightly mellower tone that is also quieter. Or if you shifted towards light, then playing with the same force as before will now produce a slightly harsher tone that is also a bit louder. To compensate for this, you should now adjust the volume a bit in the opposite direction.
That was step 3.

Ideally, you now have a digital piano that, when played with a certain force, produces about the same volume and the same timbre as an acoustic piano would produce when played with the same force. This would not have been possible if you only had the volume control, because while you could then adjust the piano to have the same volume, the timbre may not match that.

Disclaimer: This is of course an ideal scenario. In the end, you will probably have to reach a compromise, as the combination of volume and touch adjustment likely won't allow you to achieve exactly the volume/timbre combination you are aiming for. Also, all acoustic pianos do of course behave and sound different (both regarding volume and timbre), so where I wrote "same as an acoustic piano", that does essentially mean "same as you think an acoustic piano should sound" or "same as the acoustic piano you are used to sounds".

Re: CLP-645 - your touch sensitivity setting? [Re: Darkwasp] #2827179 03/15/19 11:35 AM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 48
Darkwasp Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 48
JoBert, thank you for such detailed explanation! Gonna try to found some acoustic piano in my area and play some time on it (though my teacher says that all the pianos in our city used for public performances or for teaching are in really bad shape).


Casio PX-160 (Previous), Yamaha CLP-645 (Current), Superlux HD-681
Re: CLP-645 - your touch sensitivity setting? [Re: JoeT] #2827477 03/16/19 06:40 AM
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,164
S
sullivang Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,164
Originally Posted by JoeT
Originally Posted by Sol Finker

Is there a touch sensitivity control with with 0-127 range? Does it override the keyboard touch settings?

It works separate from it and shifts the velocity range down and up entirely.


It should be noted though that when increasing the setting (from the default value of 64), it's a non linear shift - it increases the lower velocities much more than the higher velocities. (I have not yet tried lowering the setting from the default.) For example, on a setting of 80, velocity 5 is increased to about 30, yet the high velocities (around 100) are barely affected. Interestingly, at higher settings, the high velocities actually get REDUCED, and at setting 127, all velocities are mapped to a value around 100. (I haven't bothered determining the exact value).

I am using a Keyboard setting of Medium, and I am using external MIDI for testing. I am calling the Medium/64 setting my "baseline" response, so the mappings I gave are relative to this baseline.

Greg.

Last edited by sullivang; 03/16/19 06:47 AM.
Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Piano World 

Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
Christmas Ornaments Music Theme
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
ABRSM (etc.) grades look-up?
by Barly - 12/09/19 04:07 AM
What is the name of this piece?
by CianistAndPomposer - 12/09/19 02:15 AM
What's Hot!!
Our August Newsletter is Out!
------------------
Mason & Hamlin Piano Factory Tour!

-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics195,576
Posts2,899,906
Members95,191
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3