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disaster #2827386
03/16/19 01:52 AM
03/16/19 01:52 AM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 5
A
apogius Offline OP
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apogius  Offline OP
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Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 5
hello

I've been trying to start to learn the piano.So far ,my experience was a total disaster.
I am 50 years old .

To begin , when I was about 32 ,I had 3 or 4 piano lessons.My piano teacher , started teaching me the Beyer book.I decided then to quit the piano but kept the book.So until now I had just forgot about piano ,until a few short months ago I decided to give it a second chance.
Someone suggested to me some female teacher ,lets call her L.When we got started ,I told her I've already the Beyer book which I did started to practice myself in between, but L told me that's not good and she suggested a book herve pouillard piano method.
I need to state here that L is a concervatory teacher ,with a rather largeteaching experience .

When I did asked why not the Beyer method , she told me that I had to begin with both hands F and G from the beggining ,and because beyer was with the same key up to some point (using G for both) that was what got me confused .I began having trouble with the exercises she suggested ,and my main problem is until now that I can't play different notes reading two different keys at the same time,I did tried what she was telling me but after 4 or 5 lessons the Herve pouillard method exercises became very difficult for me.

Let me explain this a bit further :I came to practice some excercises suggested by my teacher ofc ,which after like 30 minutes or one hour each was impossible for me to play properly.So I did asked L once more why not another method since that metohd didn't worked for me she told me ,that's my method , I said okay ,and at the very last lesson ,she asked me to play the exercise 64 of Beyer.
She insisted I can ,but I couldn't ,so I quitted trying with L.

My second female teacher ,right after her ,had the brilliant idea of giving me a part of giving me a part of Bach piano suite number two,Courante part.I went to her house ,I explained my situation to her ,I did sat on the piano ,played for her what I could ,and that was what she suggested for me .So I got started learing the right hand with lots of effort but after a few lessons something gone very wrong for me and she also treated me very unprofessionally.Suffice to say that i gone for lesson to her home ,and ,her name was NOT at the ringbell so I had to use my cell phone to open the door.That happened twice .after that I chose to quit her too.
this fine lady is supposed to be an upcoming pianist....
Now I am willing to accept all that might sound more like fiction and less than reality ,but the sad truth is that all these are facts

So after that ,the next teacher was a man.He told me I can read good good enough ,and he suggested to start with Bach's Anna Magdalena book ,so we started studying the 1st minuet of it.After six lesson of me trying hard enough ,I can play half 1st minuet both hands together.I at every lesson was asking him what to do to improve my reading -because it is my understanding that my biggest issue is that I can't read fast enough- and the answer was , bach is enough ,you dont need any exercises.He did told me to try practising scales ,so I got started ,and trhat how I can play C ,D,E,F,G scales 2 octaves up and down proper fingered with left and right hands but NOT together.After feeling my tuition was not proper , I quitted that teacher too.

So far my experience was a disaster.I am thinking of quitting the piano .

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Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827387
03/16/19 02:03 AM
03/16/19 02:03 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,192
Finland
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outo Offline
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Joined: Aug 2012
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Finland
Reading your post I wonder if you suffer from: 1. Too high expectations for the rate of learning 2. Lack of patience with the process 3. Focusing too much on the material chosen for teaching instead of the teaching process itself.

What method or piece is chosen is less important than how your teacher and you approach it. Also, it is good not to question a teacher's methods until you have been trying them for a bit longer, unless it is clear that the teacher is not competent. You tell us nothing about how the teachers taught you: What happened on lessons and what kind of instruction you got for home practice, Those are things that matter the most imo.

Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827390
03/16/19 03:09 AM
03/16/19 03:09 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,461
Northern England.
peterws Offline
7000 Post Club Member
peterws  Offline
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Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,461
Northern England.
Piano teachers always call the shots;it's what they sell, their business, livelihood. Flexibility doesn't often come with the package. Patience can be a bit thin on the ground with some, but they each have their chosen method. Some teach to a very high standard, and often want pupils that will attain such.
Keep trying. Sooner or later you'll find one that suits.
Make sure he/she isn't left handed . . . .


"I am not a man. I am a free number"

"[Linked Image]"
Re: disaster [Re: peterws] #2827391
03/16/19 03:24 AM
03/16/19 03:24 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 44
S
Sidokar Offline
Full Member
Sidokar  Offline
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Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 44
Originally Posted by peterws
Piano teachers always call the shots;it's what they sell, their business, livelihood. Flexibility doesn't often come with the package. Patience can be a bit thin on the ground with some, but they each have their chosen method. Some teach to a very high standard, and often want pupils that will attain such.
Keep trying. Sooner or later you'll find one that suits.
Make sure he/she isn't left handed . . . .


Yep, quite true. I have pretty much the same opinion. Most teachers have a set way of doing things and they usually do not change it, wether it works for you or not. I am though rather surprised by your experience. I know the Beyer if that is the op101 and it does not start on G .... Starting with Bach suite is also a bit surprising given you are a beginner. Now you do have to know that your difficulties are perfectly normal. Having issues to read fluently is usual. It will take long time to come just for one hand and more so for both. Do not expect big progress before .... some time. Piano is a difficult instrument and you'll have to be patient especially at the beginning. If you can find a teacher which has a rather slow and gradual approach, that would be the best.

Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827402
03/16/19 03:38 AM
03/16/19 03:38 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 3,115
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content


Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 3,115
Originally Posted by apogius
I've been trying to start to learn the piano.So far ,my experience was a total disaster.

From your account, I can't determine what the disaster is although you clearly think there were multiple disasters. What do you feel should have happened instead?

For example, can you describe what you imagine as your "ideal" piano lesson? Because it's possible your expectations are unrealistically high.


across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827454
03/16/19 05:12 AM
03/16/19 05:12 AM
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 381
Sweden
Animisha Offline
Full Member
Animisha  Offline
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Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 381
Sweden
Apogius, I have the Herve Pouillard book. Did your difficulties start when you had to play "Jeu mains ensemble"? Is it the exercises called "polyphonie en do" that you cannot play?


Playing the piano is learning to create, playfully and deeply seriously, our own music in the world.
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827458
03/16/19 05:35 AM
03/16/19 05:35 AM
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 401
Jordan
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Pover Online content
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Jordan
I don't know if I'm misunderstanding the situation, but if I understand it correctly then I empathize and agree with the original poster. If he has had only a few lessons and is assigned a Bach courante, I can see how that is very problematic and IMO a bit ridiculous. For a complete beginner I feel it is wiser to start off with learning how to read notes properly one hand at a time, and slowly introducing hands together and then working on that a bit so that it doesn't seem as frightening to learn new music. Even the Bach minuet in G is a bit over the top for someone who still has trouble with basic note reading and playing.

I think you should look for a teacher who's willing to go a bit slower with you and take you step by step through the basics so that the music assigned to you is challenging but not intimidating.

Again, I'm not sure I understand exactly how it went, but if it's like what I imagined, then I agree with the original poster's frustrations.

Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827480
03/16/19 07:45 AM
03/16/19 07:45 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,507
B
bennevis Offline
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It looks like a complete mismatch between perceived ability (mostly on the teachers' part) and actual ability, coupled with totally unrealistic expectations (by both parties).

I'd say - much better to start off with a clean slate and regard yourself as a complete beginner, and start everything from scratch, with a beginner's book. Once you tell a teacher that you've been self-teaching/had lessons in the past/using a book you like for a long time, everything goes haywire: teacher thinks you know and can do a lot more than you actually know and able to do, and throws real music at you that (s)he wouldn't throw at a child student until the latter has had at least three years of lessons (not three lessons) and fluent in reading. Couple this with the very real fact that many adults don't have the patience to work through very basic stuff for weeks & weeks until it becomes simple and intuitive - like reading single notes in each hand, before going on to two notes, then three, all the while counting beats (don't forget music also has rhythm) - and you have the recipe for disillusionment and disappointment and frustration and......abandonment.

My advice won't be popular smirk - but it's going to be a lot, lot better than what you've been through. Find a qualified teacher who is used to teaching complete beginners and doesn't teach conservatory students, and tell him/her you want to be taught from the very beginning just like his/her child students, using whatever beginner primer (s)he normally uses with them. (BTW, my last teacher - following eight years of lessons with three others until I reached advanced level - only taught advanced students, and he'd have absolutely no idea how to teach beginners).

Don't even mention your previous disappointments with self-teaching and lessons, and definitely don't bring your Beyer book to the lesson. Let your new teacher use whatever he/she normally uses with his/her child students, and make sure he/she knows that you're prepared to go as slowly as necessary in order to make real progress. Rushing up one step only to fall down two is a sure way to disaster......

The only question is - do you have the patience to start at the beginning, and work through stuff that isn't very interesting (you're not going to be playing any 'real' pieces for a while, more likely nursery tunes) in order to master the basics of piano playing and note-reading, in order that you can put all your previous frustrations behind you and make real progress towards piano mastery?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827487
03/16/19 08:45 AM
03/16/19 08:45 AM
Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,033
Canada
SAMoore Offline
2000 Post Club Member
SAMoore  Offline
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Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,033
Canada
I agree with all the answers. I started at 43 years old. I had played around with a few beginner method books and then went to a local conservatory where the teacher didn’t take me seriously and said “that’s good”no matter what I did.

Then I fluked into my present teacher whom I have had now for 16 years!!! He was an accompanist and harmony teacher at the university where I worked. At my first lesson he asked me what I wanted out of my lessons. I said that I wanted to learn to the best of my abilities and was willing to do what ever he recommended. My dream piece at the time was Chopin Etude opus 10 no 3. Ha!! He didn’t laugh at all. He played it for me and another piece by Ravel that I had said I loved. Of course I was in awe that he could pull that out on a moments notice. I think I was lucky that it was a good match. He is extremely patient but firm in how I play (technique). We may spend a whole lesson on just a couple of measures. Now I often pick my own pieces with his recommendations and suggestions if I am overreaching. I still look forward to my lessons each week and this journey has helped me through some pretty stressful times as well.

BTW, I am still really only at an intermediate level. Grade 9 pieces take me months and months to learn and then not extremely polished. My sight reading is mediocre........ playing piano is HARD. My teacher often says “If it was easy, EVERYONE would be doing it.”

I think you should keep looking, don’t give up. The right teacher is out there and if you can find one, studying piano will be a wonderful experience. You DO have to have realistic expectations of your progress and most importantly enjoy the learning process as much as the playing. Good luck!


It's the journey not the destination..
[Linked Image]
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827491
03/16/19 08:57 AM
03/16/19 08:57 AM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 853
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Moo :) Offline
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Joined: Jul 2017
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4 teachers?

I don’t think a 5th teacher is the solution.

I think as a beginner you have to follow a teacher plan as they are the expert here.

When you have started with so many I think it’ll be much harder to attach to a new method.

It took me about a year following a method book until I played 1st minuet by Bach.

If you can play it at all with such little lessons that is good in my eyes !

I actually don’t think I’d have the patience to learn piano as an adult and I believe it’s really very hard to learn.

I’m always starting over enthusiastic and stopping things soon after so I don’t have answers for you.

I’d also probably have stopped after teacher one and certainly not have found a piano forum.

Maybe just give it up if u really are not enjoying it ?

Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827492
03/16/19 09:00 AM
03/16/19 09:00 AM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 853
M
Moo :) Offline
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Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 853
Sorry maybe not the right message.

I think prmerhaps discuss this with your teacher.

If it is not working after teacher 4 then I’m not sure it will.

Re: disaster [Re: bennevis] #2827494
03/16/19 09:20 AM
03/16/19 09:20 AM
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 67
R
RosemaryGirl Offline
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Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 67
I might be wrong, but I'm sensing that if apogius is taking the trouble to tell us his/her story, it's in the hope of finding encouragement and solutions that would lead to NOT giving up the piano. There's a clear hankering to learn here.

Originally Posted by bennevis
It looks like a complete mismatch between perceived ability (mostly on the teachers' part) and actual ability, coupled with totally unrealistic expectations (by both parties).

I'd say - much better to start off with a clean slate and regard yourself as a complete beginner, and start everything from scratch, with a beginner's book. Once you tell a teacher that you've been self-teaching/had lessons in the past/using a book you like for a long time, everything goes haywire: teacher thinks you know and can do a lot more than you actually know and able to do, and throws real music at you that (s)he wouldn't throw at a child student until the latter has had at least three years of lessons (not three lessons) and fluent in reading. Couple this with the very real fact that many adults don't have the patience to work through very basic stuff for weeks & weeks until it becomes simple and intuitive - like reading single notes in each hand, before going on to two notes, then three, all the while counting beats (don't forget music also has rhythm) - and you have the recipe for disillusionment and disappointment and frustration and......abandonment.

My advice won't be popular smirk - but it's going to be a lot, lot better than what you've been through. Find a qualified teacher who is used to teaching complete beginners and doesn't teach conservatory students, and tell him/her you want to be taught from the very beginning just like his/her child students, using whatever beginner primer (s)he normally uses with them. (BTW, my last teacher - following eight years of lessons with three others until I reached advanced level - only taught advanced students, and he'd have absolutely no idea how to teach beginners).

Don't even mention your previous disappointments with self-teaching and lessons, and definitely don't bring your Beyer book to the lesson. Let your new teacher use whatever he/she normally uses with his/her child students, and make sure he/she knows that you're prepared to go as slowly as necessary in order to make real progress. Rushing up one step only to fall down two is a sure way to disaster......

The only question is - do you have the patience to start at the beginning, and work through stuff that isn't very interesting (you're not going to be playing any 'real' pieces for a while, more likely nursery tunes) in order to master the basics of piano playing and note-reading, in order that you can put all your previous frustrations behind you and make real progress towards piano mastery?


I think this makes a lot of sense, and I would go with that, as well as develop an open-mind and trust in your teacher's choices/methods once you've found one who seems to make sense for you. You have to give it some time before you decide it's not the right fit again, I think. That's what I'd advise, anyway.

Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827497
03/16/19 09:41 AM
03/16/19 09:41 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 23
Spain
S
Suni Offline
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Posts: 23
Spain
I kind of understand, I think. My first teacher left me confused, in two months I felt I had made no progress, and was given music too hard for me. My vacation piece was 4 pages long, and just too hard...I gave up on her and started looking for another teacher who could start with the basics, and started self teaching from a method book in the meantime. After about 5 months I found my current teacher who is great, and am finally making better progress.

I think some teachers assume an adult beginner will not have patience with easier beginner music, and so assign music that sound good, but may be a bit too hard. I do recommend an adult beginner book (I like Faber), until you find a teacher you like. In my first lesson, I told my teacher that I had been self teaching, but was willing to start from the beginning again if necessary to learn properly. We discussed what kind of music I was interested in, and she asked me to play a few pieces from the Faber book I had learnt already, and identified my weaknesses (rhythm and articulation).

Most adult method books teach both the g and the f (treble and bass) staffs, though Czerny uses both hands on the g staff which I personally find a bit odd. Hope your next teacher is a better fit, and remember to make it clear what you are looking for.

Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827552
03/16/19 12:42 PM
03/16/19 12:42 PM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,112
Midwest USA
Stubbie Offline
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Posts: 2,112
Midwest USA
I think a lot of teachers are between a rock and a hard place when it comes to adult beginners. A lot of adult beginners have an unrealistic idea of how long it takes to advance, and are impatient with beginner pieces or dislike them(or both). So after experiencing a number of students like this, teachers try to accommodate their new adult students by starting them off with more interesting pieces and maybe even skipping some of the fundamentals. And it just doesn't work, either for the student or (ultimately) for the teacher.

The advice to start from zero is good. Stay with a teacher for at least four months (six would be better) before making any judgement about progress. If something is not working, you as a student need to bring this up with the teacher as soon as possible and make adjustments. Learning to play is a long process. You need to find some interest and satisfaction with the process itself in order to succeed. Best of luck to you!


[Linked Image]
At first, she only flew when she thought no one was watching.
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827648
03/16/19 05:50 PM
03/16/19 05:50 PM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 269
New York
M
Medved1 Offline

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Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 269
New York
Echoing what has been well said above = communicate, communicate, communicate.

First with yourself - if you are clear what you want, and equally important, how you want to get it, you will be able to be clear with your teacher.

I can understand how a method book might look like a communication device "this is what I have done so far". But I would focus not on what you have done, but to get a fresh start. "here is what I know now" - do I know how to read both treble and bass clef, or only treble. Do I know note values, or do I need to learn how to count. What is the difference between the degree of difficulty I can handle one hand by itself, compared to both hands together.

What do you think is the most important skill, the one that will let you move forward.

Perhaps as a communication device ask the teacher what he/she thinks is the bedrock skill, and see if you agree. You may or may not, but either way you are having a conversation about how you are going to learn what you want to learn.

All of us started somewhere, including the teachers!


Mason & Hamlin A ('97)
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827660
03/16/19 06:24 PM
03/16/19 06:24 PM
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 32
M
mbpress01 Offline
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Posts: 32
I went through the same thing and started very late also - actually 51. I had one guy that even after telling him that I haven’t touched a piano in 40 years, he wanted to start me on advanced Hanon and grade 4 pieces. He lasted 2 weeks and I almost quit. I then discovered online teaching and you should look up the various teachers through Skype.

Almost 3 years later here is where I am at. All scales learned and a few of them at 132 bpm 4 notes a click, all triads learned, all 7th chords learned, through both books of Adult Piano Adventures (not easy at all), and 6 pieces of repertoire. My whole focus is on Bach and I have 5 pieces in really good shape. Next step is to continue w/ the Bach inventions and then to the WTC and Fugual learning. I also spend 10-15 min sight reading using the Bach Scholar Sight Reading Book.

Please don’t give up. For whatever reason, the online teachers understand the adult beginner and have a specific plan - it goes something like this: scales, triads, sight reading, and then simple repertoire. I choose Bach but you may choose another composer.

Also, have a look at Piano Marvel - it has really helped in a few situations with working out rhythms and note reading. It has a whole program to get someone started.

Finally, be prepared for a long haul. When i first started i was doing 2 hrs a day and on the weekends 4-6 hrs. After 2 years, I figured out you need a good 1 hr to 1.5 hrs a day to improve. Anything more I just didn’t see the benefit. Also, Piano is super freakin hard. There is nothing easy at all and every new piece is horribly difficult and takes at least 3 mos. In fact, the first piece I played (Bach Minuet in G) is still a work in process but prob around 8 times out of 10 its perfect and sounds good.

Good luck to you and I encourage you to keep going. It’s pretty rewarding and the better you get the more fun it is.

Re: disaster [Re: Pover] #2827664
03/16/19 06:35 PM
03/16/19 06:35 PM
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 4,743
Richmond, BC, Canada
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Charles Cohen Offline
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Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 4,743
Richmond, BC, Canada
Originally Posted by Pover
I don't know if I'm misunderstanding the situation, but if I understand it correctly then I empathize and agree with the original poster. If he has had only a few lessons and is assigned a Bach courante, I can see how that is very problematic and IMO a bit ridiculous. For a complete beginner I feel it is wiser to start off with learning how to read notes properly one hand at a time, and slowly introducing hands together and then working on that a bit so that it doesn't seem as frightening to learn new music. Even the Bach minuet in G is a bit over the top for someone who still has trouble with basic note reading and playing.

I think you should look for a teacher who's willing to go a bit slower with you and take you step by step through the basics so that the music assigned to you is challenging but not intimidating.

Again, I'm not sure I understand exactly how it went, but if it's like what I imagined, then I agree with the original poster's frustrations.


+1.

It's good to learn to walk, before you try to run.

Part of this may be mis-communication. If the teacher asks:

. . . "Can you read music?"

and the student says:

. . . "Yes."

that is a vague question, and a vague answer. And mis-understanding by the teacher might lead to:

. . . "OK, let's start with this Bach courante . . . "

When a better response might be:

. . . "OK -- let's start with Alfred, Book One, and see what you can do."

But -- faced with clear inability to handle the assigned material -- I'd think that most teachers would stop, at the beginning of the second lesson (playing the Courante) and say:

. . . "I think we should do some remedial work first."

Challenge is good; impossible challenge is almost always bad.

When I was looking for a singing teacher, my fundamental requirement was for someone who was used to teaching _adult amateurs_. I knew what I knew, and how much I had to learn, and how slowly I was likely to learn it.


. Charles
---------------------------
PX-350 / microKorg XL+ / Pianoteq / Lounge Lizard / Korg Wavedrum / EV ZXA1 speaker
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827675
03/16/19 07:11 PM
03/16/19 07:11 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 140
Sheffield, UK
K
KevinM Online content
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Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 140
Sheffield, UK
I have been lucky I think. After a forty year break when I think I completed something like level 6 as a child. I have returned to the piano.

I started by myself for 6 weeks with really simple sheet music and scales. A surprising amount of skill returned in those weeks. To start with I could hardly read sheet music, my fingers were incredibly clumsy when I started. If I had started with a teacher I would have been considered as a new player if based on my skill and knowledge.

One of the first things my teacher did was have me site read some pieces starting at a very basic level and then continue up until it was clear I was struggling. Based on that she decided that starting on level 5 seemed appropriate. She knows I don’t feel the need to do exams. I do very little in the way of scales or theory and perhaps she is concerned that, that kind of regimented approach might not work for me as an adult student. But perhaps I need to discuss this with her because I don’t want one aspect of learning to hold me back. I do 1 1/2 hours a day practise most days, I would do more if I had the time and my hands could take it.

I suppose one thing I remember from learning as a child is, that it is just damnably slow to see improvement. This means I recognise I need to enjoy the practise, listen and enjoy what I am learning with its rough edges. I enjoy my practise, fixing mistakes, focussing on measures that are difficult. What will happen if I start filling up my practise with scales and theory? Will enjoyment go?

So level 5 for me is tough, but it feels within my grasp in terms of the music I am learning.


Learning Mendelssohn Song without Words Op. 19 No. 2, Schumann Bunte Blätter Stücklein No 1. Op. 99. Jensen Sehnsucht Op. 8 No. 5.
Digital piano: Casio Celiviano AP-470.
Re: disaster [Re: apogius] #2827680
03/16/19 07:32 PM
03/16/19 07:32 PM
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 180
M
Michael P Walsh Offline
Full Member
Michael P Walsh  Offline
Full Member
M

Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 180
Roll it back to the very beginning, Alfreds or Suzuki book 1 if you can find someone to teach it (doesn't have to be the Suzuki method, just use the book). It can be a very frustrating experience if the pieces are even a touch beyond, at least in the very early stages. it was only after Suzuki 1 that I felt I could begin the easier Anna Magdalena, easy Schumann/Tchaikovsky.

Last edited by Michael P Walsh; 03/16/19 07:36 PM.
Re: disaster [Re: Sidokar] #2827688
03/16/19 08:25 PM
03/16/19 08:25 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,577
Canada
keystring Offline
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keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,577
Canada
Originally Posted by Sidokar
I know the Beyer if that is the op101 and it does not start on G ....

Sometimes, and in some languages, the treble clef is called the "G clef", and the bass clef is called the "F clef". Since the OP referred to G and F, I think it means those clefs. I looked up Beyer and the introductory book starts both hands playing the treble clef ("G clef"). A few teachers have cited future problems with such an approach.

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