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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828027
03/17/19 10:44 PM
03/17/19 10:44 PM
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Well, if you do decide to cook for the piano teacher, make sure you get a few cooking lessons first. wink

I had a student who wanted to teach a few students on the side. I told her, music is so precious, you want to give a youngster the best possible chance of succeeding by taking some lessons in pedagogy first. I gave some indications of what can happen if an inexperienced teacher errs (students crying from being pushed too fast etc.) Since this family had a connection to guitar playing as well, they had the dabble mentality.

Her father was a tax lawyer, and her mother an accountant. But none of them could see that I too had a craft, one that I would hope some students would respect and some attempt to learn. They thought you can just jump in just like with guitar. (I don't have a high opinion of guitar players or guitar teachers. So rarely are they adequately trained. So rarely do children persist in their guitar lessons.) In the end, my student left the child to learn elsewhere.

Of course, at uni, I thought the same thing as this family. When I finished my degree, I had taught three students. I returned to my city and was somewhat taken aback when my teacher thought I could benefit from lessons in pedagogy. But I deferred to her better judgement. In case anybody thinks she was out to make a buck, she only charged me for my piano lessons, not my pedagogy lessons. She was right. I'm very grateful to her.

P.S. Malkin, just because somebody takes offence to something doesn't mean it's offensive in any sort of objective sense. Besides, often I take offence to new things as a defence mechanism only to realize later that the other person was right, as with my piano teacher in the above story.

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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Candywoman] #2828081
03/18/19 03:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Candywoman
Well, if you do decide to cook for the piano teacher, make sure you get a few cooking lessons first. wink

I had a student who wanted to teach a few students on the side. I told her, music is so precious, you want to give a youngster the best possible chance of succeeding by taking some lessons in pedagogy first. I gave some indications of what can happen if an inexperienced teacher errs (students crying from being pushed too fast etc.) Since this family had a connection to guitar playing as well, they had the dabble mentality.

Her father was a tax lawyer, and her mother an accountant. But none of them could see that I too had a craft, one that I would hope some students would respect and some attempt to learn. They thought you can just jump in just like with guitar. (I don't have a high opinion of guitar players or guitar teachers. So rarely are they adequately trained. So rarely do children persist in their guitar lessons.) In the end, my student left the child to learn elsewhere.

Of course, at uni, I thought the same thing as this family. When I finished my degree, I had taught three students. I returned to my city and was somewhat taken aback when my teacher thought I could benefit from lessons in pedagogy. But I deferred to her better judgement. In case anybody thinks she was out to make a buck, she only charged me for my piano lessons, not my pedagogy lessons. She was right. I'm very grateful to her.

P.S. Malkin, just because somebody takes offence to something doesn't mean it's offensive in any sort of objective sense. Besides, often I take offence to new things as a defence mechanism only to realize later that the other person was right, as with my piano teacher in the above story.



It would be fascinating to know more about your own piano playing background one day Candywoman. As it stands your posts have been most helpful in assuring me I’m perfectly capable, thank you very much.


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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Candywoman] #2828179
03/18/19 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Candywoman
Well, if you do decide to cook for the piano teacher, make sure you get a few cooking lessons first. wink

I had a student who wanted to teach a few students on the side. I told her, music is so precious, you want to give a youngster the best possible chance of succeeding by taking some lessons in pedagogy first.

As you're obviously a great pedagogue, Candywoman, I'm curious as to how you would inspire your little unmusical charges to develop an interest in the wonderful world of piano literature and what the piano is capable of, in terms of its ability - in the right hands - to covey the whole gamut of emotions from deep pathos to unbridled joy. Unmusical charges like I once was, at the age of ten, when I had my first piano lesson (because my parents wanted to keep up with the Joneses, not because they loved music - they didn't).

Are you able to play great pieces from the piano oeuvre for them, to the level of a conservatory student, like my first teacher did? Say, a simple piece like Liszt's Liebestraum. That was how she inspired me - so much so that I got her to write down in my notebook every piece she played for me, which I've kept to this day. Pieces ranging from Scarlatti's Kk141 to Stravinsky's Petrushka (Danse russe), from Bach's Goldberg Aria to Barber's Excursions via Beethoven, Brahms and Bartók. I promised her that I'd learn them all and play them myself when I became good enough......and I did.

She was 19, had no teaching experience (I was her first student), no lessons in pedagogy, no mentoring from anyone. All she had was just her ABRSM teaching diploma certificate, twelve years of piano experience, a lot of enthusiasm - and the ability to impart it - and a great love of classical music and the piano literature, and the ability to play at conservatory level, as well as sight-read almost anything and play by ear. (The first piece she played for me was - at my request - the theme from 'Love Story', which she played entirely by ear, decorating the sentimental tune with sweeping Lisztian arpeggios of her own invention, up & down the keyboard. I never forgot her amazing rendition.)

I was hooked, and she ensured that I remained inspired to keep plugging away at daily practicing, despite my total lack of any musical aptitude, which led to where I am today, an amateur pianist who plays recitals to inspire others. Just as I was inspired by my first teacher.

Oh, did I mention that she had no lessons in pedagogy, and she'd never taught anyone before?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: bennevis] #2828188
03/18/19 09:32 AM
03/18/19 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by bennevis

Oh, did I mention that she had no lessons in pedagogy, and she'd never taught anyone before?

I have not talked about this in a long time. I was also a brass player, and I started teaching brass without any training in teaching, but I was an old man compared to your first teacher. I was something like 23.

And my first brass student was much older. She was 14. She majored in music and was one of about 5 of the best students I've ever taught. We were talking again recently. I'm still close friends with her parents.

I guess it's a good thing I didn't realize I could not teach well because I had no pedagogy classes. wink


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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: bennevis] #2828242
03/18/19 11:02 AM
03/18/19 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
All she had was just her ABRSM teaching diploma certificate ... Oh, did I mention that she had no lessons in pedagogy

Not familiar with ABRSM, but what is the ABRSM teaching diploma certificate if not a certificate in pedagogy? That's odd since RCM's teaching certificate is a certification in piano pedagogy, and I'd been under the impression that ABRSM, RCM, and Trinity nearly mirror each other, but it seems ABRSM is different in this respect.


across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2828247
03/18/19 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
All she had was just her ABRSM teaching diploma certificate ... Oh, did I mention that she had no lessons in pedagogy

Not familiar with ABRSM, but what is the ABRSM teaching diploma certificate if not a certificate in pedagogy? That's odd since RCM's teaching certificate is a certification in piano pedagogy, and I'd been under the impression that ABRSM, RCM, and Trinity nearly mirror each other, but it seems ABRSM is different in this respect.


It's a highly regarded certificate in pedagogy/teaching but it's not one that requires any formal training in "how to teach" to receive it. If you have the prerequisites, can perform to the required standard, and can demonstrate sufficient in-depth knowledge about the repertoire and teaching practice then you can pass, and plenty of people achieve that through self-teaching and experience.

I've been making copious enquiries of various UK sources in the past few days and my understanding of the situation is quite correct. There are some taught courses that can assist/mentor you through acquiring a diploma, because obviously it is tough, but there are none in my particular part of the UK. Some diplomas require you already to be teaching before you can take the exam. But people just don't take lessons in "how to teach", not in the sense that it's meant here anyway. Generally professionals are relaxed about whether teachers are formally qualified or not because some "unqualified" teachers can be excellent and some "qualified" teachers can be terrible, so it's down to personal preference for one's own professional development.

Last edited by ShyPianist; 03/18/19 11:15 AM.

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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828274
03/18/19 12:09 PM
03/18/19 12:09 PM
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Well, it looks like we're talking past each other. I'm just about ready to give up but I'll give it one more try.

Bennevis: After many years of playing all sorts of piano pieces for students, I have learned that only a certain number of them will translate my enthusiasm and passion for music into them actually practicing their own music. You would have been one of them. I try to play once per lesson. I play their pieces, my pieces, popular music such as Viva la Vida, all kinds of excerpts from pieces. It doesn't matter. If they take soccer and all their other sports and run around town, they don't find time to put that inspiration to use. They do end up sounding like me, but it takes them a fairly long time to play their intermediate pieces so they don't produce many pieces per year. They end up quitting at about age 17 here because of university and other busy-ness such as their part-time jobs, etc...

I don't know how to understand your profile, but I don't think you are a piano teacher. Correct me if I'm wrong. There are many students who plod because that's what they do, not because of a lack of inspiration from the teacher. Where's the inspiration from the student TO to the teacher? That's the kind of inspiration that's truly fun to work with. I have two kid now who are like that, and who make me look forward to their lessons.

ShyPianist: Some of the knowledge I'm talking about you could conceivably learn on your own, but could learn faster from a piano teacher.

Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Candywoman] #2828281
03/18/19 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Candywoman

ShyPianist: Some of the knowledge I'm talking about you could conceivably learn on your own, but could learn faster from a piano teacher.


Yes and no. What I categorically don't want is to learn one person's method of teaching. I want to appraise all the information and research there is out there (as much as possible) and form my own judgements. That's what widespread reading and personal experience can do, and attending CPD courses if that's possible, and what learning from one single teacher would most probably not do. I agree a mentor could certainly be helpful, but not simply a local piano teacher because who's to say they are any more qualified to teach me about teaching than I am myself? So I need to find a teacher who takes people up to diploma level and beyond. Those are normally affiliated to music colleges and I am hundreds of miles away from one of those. So I expect you now understand the issues. As I said there is very clearly a big culture difference between the USA and the UK in this respect.


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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828287
03/18/19 12:33 PM
03/18/19 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by ShyPianist
So I need to find a teacher who takes people up to diploma level and beyond. Those are normally affiliated to music colleges and I am hundreds of miles away from one of those. So I expect you now understand the issues. As I said there is very clearly a big culture difference between the USA and the UK in this respect.

As long as you don't get a piano teacher that looks like Isabelle Huppert to help you with pedagogy, you should be safe ShyPianist! wink


across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2828316
03/18/19 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
All she had was just her ABRSM teaching diploma certificate ... Oh, did I mention that she had no lessons in pedagogy

Not familiar with ABRSM, but what is the ABRSM teaching diploma certificate if not a certificate in pedagogy? That's odd since RCM's teaching certificate is a certification in piano pedagogy, and I'd been under the impression that ABRSM, RCM, and Trinity nearly mirror each other, but it seems ABRSM is different in this respect.

Yes, the ABRSM teaching certificate 'qualifies' you to teach - and in my home country (and likely also in the UK among the people who know about these things) - nobody would hire a piano teacher who didn't hold such a diploma, or its equivalent. Teachers were - and still are - held in high esteem, but they have to show that they've earned that by having suitable qualifications. Not by saying - "look, I've had pedagogy lessons from so-and-so, therefore I know how to teach".

So, my teacher was qualified to teach me, but she never had any lessons on how to teach: she obtained her Grade 8 in her mid-teens, and continued to have lessons from her teacher while studying the requirements of the ABRSM teaching diploma exam by herself. The teaching diploma has different requirements from the performance diploma (which was the one I did) - with the latter, you don't have to demonstrate knowledge of suitable rep for each grade in various styles; you just have to present your pieces and perform them very well from memory, and demonstrate a wide range of musical knowledge.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828318
03/18/19 02:03 PM
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Quote
and in my home country (and likely also in the UK among the people who know about these things) - nobody would hire a piano teacher who didn't hold such a diploma, or its equivalent.


Which is the thing that always bemused me because some diplomas do actually require you to be teaching before you can even take them. I was pleased to realise the DipABRSM isn't one of them (the first of three tiers of ABRSM diplomas), because as I think I've said before on this thread (sorry if I'm repeating myself too much) I really wouldn't feel comfortable in taking on any paid pupils without such a qualification (although views within the teaching profession differ on that, as again I've already said). I think my son is a different case. Number one because he's my son, my responsibility, my risk, and also because he is not looking for the kind of formal teaching that I think others have perhaps assumed. He's getting it at the moment, Animisha's very first comment on this thread about formalising it to a set time each week was fantastically helpful there, but it isn't the number one objective, as I hope is clear by now. :-)

Incidentally my son's guitar teacher has teaching experience behind him but no formal qualifications to my knowledge. I judged his suitability on the way he interacted with my son and his general approach to how he would teach him (basically inspiring him to look beyond being your average strummer, and also allowing him to experiment). I was comfortable to do that, but for parents without a musical background I can see that the qualification is going to be what they look for first & foremost, for reassurance.

Last edited by ShyPianist; 03/18/19 02:12 PM.

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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828329
03/18/19 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ShyPianist
Quote
and in my home country (and likely also in the UK among the people who know about these things) - nobody would hire a piano teacher who didn't hold such a diploma, or its equivalent.


Which is the thing that always bemused me because some diplomas do actually require you to be teaching before you can even take them. I was pleased to realise the DipABRSM isn't one of them, because as I think I've said before on this thread (sorry if I'm repeating myself too much) I really wouldn't feel comfortable in taking on any paid pupils without such a qualification.

I think that having studied in one of the music colleagues would have qualified you to be a teacher for most people, because everyone knows how stringent the standards are to get into one of them.

My first piano teacher "deserted" me after Grade 1 in order to continue her piano studies in one of the London colleges (I don't know which). As a 'going away' present, she gave me a volume of Mozart's best-known piano music (sonatas, rondos, variations) - all of which were way beyond my capabilities at the time. (She knew that Mozart was my favourite composer). She told me she was confident that one day, I'd be good enough to play all the music in it. How could I not live up to her expectations after that? I still use the book now, and yes, I've played all the pieces in it. whistle

Luckily, I was completely hooked on piano by then, so I didn't suffer unduly from being passed on to another teacher, who wasn't quite an inspirational a teacher as my previous one. She was older, having taught for many years, and only occasionally played for me.



Quote
..... for parents without a musical background I can see that the qualification is going to be what they look for first & foremost, for reassurance.

Qualifications and exam results were all my parents knew, and in order to keep on with piano lessons after I'd moved to a boarding school in UK, I had to continue bringing home a new ABRSM certificate every year, and with good marks. Otherwise, they'd stop paying for lessons. I could hardly blame them, as they cared nothing for music, and my playing (when I was home for the summer holidays) just sounded like cacophony to them. Even Mozart at his (and my wink ) sweetest......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: bennevis] #2828330
03/18/19 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Yes, the ABRSM teaching certificate 'qualifies' you to teach - and in my home country (and likely also in the UK among the people who know about these things) - nobody would hire a piano teacher who didn't hold such a diploma, or its equivalent. Teachers were - and still are - held in high esteem, but they have to show that they've earned that by having suitable qualifications. Not by saying - "look, I've had pedagogy lessons from so-and-so, therefore I know how to teach".

Originally Posted by ShyPianist
but for parents without a musical background I can see that the qualification is going to be what they look for first & foremost, for reassurance.

I have a good friend whose young niece loves music but her family is poor from a non-Western country. So my friend agreed to pay for his niece to take weekly classical guitar lessons. He didn't specify who the teacher should be or any requirements at all, and left all that up to the parents, since the cost of such lessons was high for their country, her parents wanted to find "the right teacher" for that amount of money. Not knowing anything about music, guitars, classical guitar, the first thing the parents did was to look for a professional certificate. So yes, in some countries, the certification (or an appropriate degree) are the overriding concern, before any concern about the quality of the teaching.

(BTW, my friend offered to pay for piano lessons, but his niece preferred classical guitar - alas!)


across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828334
03/18/19 02:48 PM
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Quote
Qualifications and exam results were all my parents knew, and in order to keep on with piano lessons after I'd moved to a boarding school in UK, I had to continue bringing home a new ABRSM certificate every year, and with good marks.


I wasn't in a boarding school, but otherwise that mindset sounds very very familiar!


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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: bennevis] #2828410
03/18/19 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
There is a huge difference in piano teaching between the UK and USA, which I've got to know from the years I've spent lurking and posting here (often to some teachers' infuriation, for which I care not a toss grin ).

I was going to let this dig slide, because it's not my fight, but it has irritated me for the last day - I may not have been born the in the US, but it's been my adopted homeland for many years. Having spent many years on your side of the Atlantic, I just feel there is a tendency to characterize Americans as rough around the edges in all areas and now I see this in piano pedagogy in this thread. But perhaps those in the US get a last laugh on our brethren on the other side of the pond? I would put up my 382yo alma mater against any college on your side of the Atlantic, Oxford and Cambridge included.

In the piano area, have we forgotten that Julliard remains one of the top, if not the top piano pedagogical institution, and that 89.8% of the matriculating students there were trained by US-based teachers? Your contempt of US piano teachers as an entire group, is misplaced when considering the final results achieved.

That almost every UK piano student takes a rigorous piano curriculum and has to pass exams is all well and good if the aim to to pass exams. But based on the results of creating pianists for which schools like Julliard, Curtis, Eastman, and Yale bear some witness to US students learning piano well, I'd say your comments are not accurate and a bit insulting to US-based teachers, as a whole. Certainly,, you've gotten the Royal Academy of Music, Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and a few other top conservatories, but at the end of the, as I said above with my alma mater, I would put up Julliard, Curtis, Eastman, Yale against those any day.

Just because US/American methods are not those used on your side of the Atlantic, does not mean that they can't be equally, if not even more, effective.


across the stone, deathless piano performances

"Discipline is more reliable than motivation." -by a contributor on Reddit r/piano
"Success is 10% inspiration, and 90% perspiration." -by some other wise person
"Pianoteq manages to keep it all together yet simultaneously also go in all directions; like a quantum particle entangled with an unknown and spooky parallel universe simply waiting to be discovered." -by Pete14
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2828414
03/18/19 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
There is a huge difference in piano teaching between the UK and USA, which I've got to know from the years I've spent lurking and posting here (often to some teachers' infuriation, for which I care not a toss grin ).

I was going to let this dig slide, because it's not my fight, but it has irritated me for the last day - I may not have been born the in the US, but it's been my adopted homeland for many years. Having spent many years on your side of the Atlantic, I just feel there is a tendency to characterize Americans as rough around the edges in all areas and now I see this in piano pedagogy in this thread.

You've got hold of the wrong end of the stick.

Try reading my 'offending' post another way.......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: bennevis] #2828416
03/18/19 07:30 PM
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Tyrone Slothrop Offline
Tyrone Slothrop  Offline

7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 7,088
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
There is a huge difference in piano teaching between the UK and USA, which I've got to know from the years I've spent lurking and posting here (often to some teachers' infuriation, for which I care not a toss grin ).

I was going to let this dig slide, because it's not my fight, but it has irritated me for the last day - I may not have been born the in the US, but it's been my adopted homeland for many years. Having spent many years on your side of the Atlantic, I just feel there is a tendency to characterize Americans as rough around the edges in all areas and now I see this in piano pedagogy in this thread.

You've got hold of the wrong end of the stick.

Try reading my 'offending' post another way.......

Oh! You meant it in reverse? Now why didn't you say that in the first place! grin


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Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2828425
03/18/19 07:53 PM
03/18/19 07:53 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,266
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,266
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by bennevis
There is a huge difference in piano teaching between the UK and USA, which I've got to know from the years I've spent lurking and posting here (often to some teachers' infuriation, for which I care not a toss grin ).

I was going to let this dig slide, because it's not my fight, but it has irritated me for the last day - I may not have been born the in the US, but it's been my adopted homeland for many years. Having spent many years on your side of the Atlantic, I just feel there is a tendency to characterize Americans as rough around the edges in all areas and now I see this in piano pedagogy in this thread.

You've got hold of the wrong end of the stick.

Try reading my 'offending' post another way.......

Oh! You meant it in reverse? Now why didn't you say that in the first place! grin

Hmmm, looks like I'll have to translate, so that the right people are suitably offended..... grin

There is a huge difference in piano teaching between the UK and USA, which I've got to know from the years I've spent lurking and posting here.
Often, my posts have infuriated some teachers in this forum, for which I don't give a toss.


There, I've split my sentence into two, which should make my message clearer than mud.....


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2828426
03/18/19 08:00 PM
03/18/19 08:00 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 572
UK
S
ShyPianist Offline OP
500 Post Club Member
ShyPianist  Offline OP
500 Post Club Member
S

Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 572
UK
Quote
I was going to let this dig slide, because it's not my fight, but it has irritated me for the last day...


I really hope it’s not anybody’s “fight”! What I detect from this whole thread is that the methods in the US and the UK are massively different, and I mean massively. (Who even uses the word pedagogy anyway? 😉). But that doesn’t mean one is better than the other. Many of the recommended texts on my reading list come from the US, so do most of the method books (much to my annoyance - quarter notes, half notes, pah, what’s wrong with crotchets and minims?).

When you stop to think about it the U.K. tradition of just getting on with it is a bit mad, but that’s simply how it is, so obviously we aspiring teachers (maybe, still not decided!) have to work with the system we have. Make no mistake though, our diplomas are rigorous. But in neither country is a formal qualification required before you can teach so in that sense we’re not so different.

It never ceases to amaze me how we in the US and the UK respectively can talk the same language and yet really really not!


Pianist, independent music arranger, violinist, mother
Re: Teaching my 12 year old and some general questions [Re: ShyPianist] #2828428
03/18/19 08:04 PM
03/18/19 08:04 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,009
In the Ozarks of Missouri
NobleHouse Offline
3000 Post Club Member
NobleHouse  Offline
3000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,009
In the Ozarks of Missouri
Originally Posted by ShyPianist
Quote
I was going to let this dig slide, because it's not my fight, but it has irritated me for the last day...


I really hope it’s not anybody’s “fight”! What I detect from this whole thread is that the methods in the US and the UK are massively different, and I mean massively. (Who even uses the word pedagogy anyway? 😉). But that doesn’t mean one is better than the other. Many of the recommended texts on my reading list come from the US, so do most of the method books (much to my annoyance - quarter notes, half notes, pah, what’s wrong with crotchets and minims?).

When you stop to think about it the U.K. tradition of just getting on with it is a bit mad, but that’s simply how it is, so obviously we aspiring teachers (maybe, still not decided!) have to work with the system we have. Make no mistake though, our diplomas are rigorous. But in neither country is a formal qualification required before you can teach so in that sense we’re not so different.

It never ceases to amaze me how we in the US and the UK respectively can talk the same language and yet really really not!


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