Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
109 registered members (Alan LJ, AnthonyPaulO, anotherscott, aphexdisklavier, anamnesis, atcsam, Barrasman, Animisha, BigIslandGuy, 19 invisible), 1,470 guests, and 3 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
question from a parent helping a young piano student #2813797
02/11/19 09:11 PM
02/11/19 09:11 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
P
parent_helper Offline OP
Junior Member
parent_helper  Offline OP
Junior Member
P

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
Hello Piano Teachers,

I am the parent of a 7 year old who is currently learning Faber Adventures 3A. My child requires a lot of help from me each week to sit next to her and count the beats out for her. She gets 3 pieces per week as homework, and cannot sight reading them on her own. Her teacher does not have time to get through all 3 pieces during the 30 minute lesson because she has trouble playing through the pieces after her teacher plays them for her. When we get home, we go through the pieces very slowly one hand at a time until she can play them herself and count on her own. This has gone on for almost 2 years now (starting from prep level). She can read notes ones at a time, but does not fully understand that left hand and right hand work do different things.

My question is, does this mean the piano is not for her? Am I not helping her the right way? Should she quit? Should I be forcing her to sight read everything (tried that, she did not know what to do when she is not told what to do). Or is learning by rote a perfectly fine way to learn to play? After practicing 100 times per piece and counting it out very slowly, she can play pretty well. Is that good enough?

The reason I am concerned is, her teacher is starting to get impatient with her, and that brought me a lot of stress. I used to think it'll take as a long as it takes. But now it seems like I am just a crutch.

Please advise and thanks in advance.

Thanks

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813813
02/11/19 09:39 PM
02/11/19 09:39 PM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
AZNpiano Offline
7000 Post Club Member
AZNpiano  Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
Wow, this sounds like those Transfer Wrecks I keep getting.

If your daughter is still learning by rote after two years of lessons, it's time to change teachers.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813816
02/11/19 09:47 PM
02/11/19 09:47 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
P
parent_helper Offline OP
Junior Member
parent_helper  Offline OP
Junior Member
P

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
Hi AZNpiano,

Thanks for writing back.
Admittedly, being called a "wreck" hurts a little. My daughter works very hard, and is more than willing to practice is with me daily, even if it's just copying step by step. The practice goes slowly, but she never shows up to class unrehearsed.

How will changing teachers help? I am starting to think maybe the problem is she should not be playing 3A, but should go back to a lower level where she is competent to sight read everything herself.

Thanks so much sharing your wisdom.

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813819
02/11/19 09:56 PM
02/11/19 09:56 PM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
AZNpiano Offline
7000 Post Club Member
AZNpiano  Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
Really, level 3A is not that far a stretch for two years of lessons. In fact, it's on the slow end. However, if you have to spoonfeed your daughter little by little, she's not reading. It is perfectly possible that the teacher is blind to all this problem because you are spoonfeeding your daughter at home.

Going to a lower level "might" help, but I think a better course of action is to change teachers and start over from scratch. That's what I did with two girls who just came to me after one year of "piano lessons" with a truly incompetent teacher. Yikes.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813821
02/11/19 10:02 PM
02/11/19 10:02 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
P
parent_helper Offline OP
Junior Member
parent_helper  Offline OP
Junior Member
P

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
Thanks AZNpiano.

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813826
02/11/19 10:10 PM
02/11/19 10:10 PM
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 101
Canada
pianist_lady Offline
Full Member
pianist_lady  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 101
Canada
Originally Posted by parent_helper
My child requires a lot of help from me each week to sit next to her and count the beats out for her. She gets 3 pieces per week as homework, and cannot sight reading them on her own. Her teacher does not have time to get through all 3 pieces during the 30 minute lesson because she has trouble playing through the pieces after her teacher plays them for her.


Your child should not have pieces that she can't read on her own. Ideally she should be able to sight-read hands alone in the lesson with minimal help from the teacher. In the lesson the teacher needs to make sure the student knows enough to work independently at home. At 7 years old, it's normal to require supervision for home practice but not to the point of teaching every note.

Originally Posted by parent_helper

I am starting to think maybe the problem is she should not be playing 3A, but should go back to a lower level where she is competent to sight read everything herself.


Yes.


Private piano teacher
B. Mus., M.Mus. (piano performance & pedagogy).
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813874
02/12/19 02:22 AM
02/12/19 02:22 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,701
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,701
Canada
Being blunt:
Originally Posted by parent_helper

I am the parent of a 7 year old who is currently learning Faber Adventures 3A. My child requires a lot of help from me each week to sit next to her and count the beats out for her. She gets 3 pieces per week as homework, and cannot sight reading them on her own. Her teacher does not have time to get through all 3 pieces during the 30 minute lesson because she has trouble playing through the pieces after her teacher plays them for her. When we get home, we go through the pieces very slowly one hand at a time until she can play them herself and count on her own. This has gone on for almost 2 years now (starting from prep level). She can read notes ones at a time, but does not fully understand that left hand and right hand work do different things.

My question is, does this mean the piano is not for her? Am I not helping her the right way? Should she quit? Should I be forcing her to sight read everything (tried that, she did not know what to do when she is not told what to do). Or is learning by rote a perfectly fine way to learn to play? After practicing 100 times per piece and counting it out very slowly, she can play pretty well. Is that good enough?

The reason I am concerned is, her teacher is starting to get impatient with her, and that brought me a lot of stress. I used to think it'll take as a long as it takes.

During the "lesson" your child's teacher plays three pieces of music, and your child plays the piece back, and then goes home. Is that teaching? Once home you, the parent, work with her on counting and other things she needs. So you're doing the teaching, as well as you know how. Surely there is something wrong with this picture. One can assume this has been going on for both years.

It has nothing to do with whether the piano is "right for her" - but whether she is being taught skills. In regard to whether you are helping her the right way; if you are compensating for the lacks in lessons, should you have to do so, and find better ways to teach your child? There are indeed people who take on the teaching profession who do little more than play for the student and have the student play back - where "teaching" consists of going through pieces. That is not teaching. The actual piano teachers here might care to elaborate. smile

Originally Posted by pianist lady
In the lesson the teacher needs to make sure the student knows enough to work independently at home

Yes, and for that to happen, the teacher has to impart skills to the student. You're probably saying the same thing. smile

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813876
02/12/19 02:24 AM
02/12/19 02:24 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,701
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,701
Canada
Btw, the term "transfer wreck" has been coined to refer to a student who has been "wrecked" by poor teaching, and it refers more to the teaching than to the student. Good teachers have the thankless job of reteaching and unteaching, and understandably, it is frustrating for them.

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: keystring] #2813879
02/12/19 02:43 AM
02/12/19 02:43 AM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
AZNpiano Offline
7000 Post Club Member
AZNpiano  Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
Originally Posted by keystring
Btw, the term "transfer wreck" has been coined to refer to a student who has been "wrecked" by poor teaching, and it refers more to the teaching than to the student. Good teachers have the thankless job of reteaching and unteaching, and understandably, it is frustrating for them.

In some cases, the problem is inherently cultural. I've had to de-culture some of these parents of Transfer Wrecks, and I'm not always successful at that. One of my acquaintances (whose two wild kids I would NEVER teach) went around interviewing piano teachers in her area. All of them told her that they are not taking beginners until the parents work out note-reading with the kids. THEN, they can start piano lessons. The teachers put the onus of teaching the reading on the parents. These "teachers" also make the parents hire "practice monitors" to watch the kids practice during the week. I actually stopped and asked one of these teachers, and she told me she doesn't have enough energy to teach young beginners--yet she has a packed schedule and a long waiting list.

How stupid is that? Worse, how stupid are these parents to fall for that cultural pitfall? And this is NORMAL in that area, including some teachers who have been teaching over 30 years!!!

This goes FAR beyond reteaching and unteaching. I have to sledgehammer an entire cultural norm.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2813907
02/12/19 05:16 AM
02/12/19 05:16 AM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
P
parent_helper Offline OP
Junior Member
parent_helper  Offline OP
Junior Member
P

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 16
Hi all,

Thank you so much for sharing your teaching wisdom.

My daughter has never cried or fought with me over piano practice, so I had no idea the piano lessons are not working. The practice has just been something we do, always slowly, until she gets it. I didn't realize she was supposed to come home knowing the pieces mostly.

Since we have a contract with the teacher, changing teacher is not an option at the moment. I will let her teacher know that she has been having trouble with these pieces and needing a lot of help, and see if we could downgrade her to easier pieces to make sure she can read them and drive her own piano practice, with me as moral support.

Thanks again.

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: AZNpiano] #2814194
02/12/19 06:17 PM
02/12/19 06:17 PM
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
South Florida
G
Gary D. Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Gary D.  Offline
6000 Post Club Member
G

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
South Florida
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by keystring
Btw, the term "transfer wreck" has been coined to refer to a student who has been "wrecked" by poor teaching, and it refers more to the teaching than to the student. Good teachers have the thankless job of reteaching and unteaching, and understandably, it is frustrating for them.

In some cases, the problem is inherently cultural. I've had to de-culture some of these parents of Transfer Wrecks, and I'm not always successful at that. One of my acquaintances (whose two wild kids I would NEVER teach) went around interviewing piano teachers in her area. All of them told her that they are not taking beginners until the parents work out note-reading with the kids. THEN, they can start piano lessons. The teachers put the onus of teaching the reading on the parents. These "teachers" also make the parents hire "practice monitors" to watch the kids practice during the week. I actually stopped and asked one of these teachers, and she told me she doesn't have enough energy to teach young beginners--yet she has a packed schedule and a long waiting list.

How stupid is that? Worse, how stupid are these parents to fall for that cultural pitfall? And this is NORMAL in that area, including some teachers who have been teaching over 30 years!!!

This goes FAR beyond reteaching and unteaching. I have to sledgehammer an entire cultural norm.

It's making money vs teaching. People will demand that reading be done BEFORE getting to them for the same reason the Piano in a Flash guy tells people they don't need fingering or the bass clef.

Anyone who knows just a little about what we know also knows that the basics are the most important thing, and anyone who does not have them is doomed to fail.

It's also true that with each unsuccessful year of piano lessons the chance of eventual success goes down ridiculously. For each student and teacher there is a honeymoon period, and if things go well in that period, chances of success are very high. If not, chances of success are nearly zero.


Piano Teacher
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2814206
02/12/19 06:58 PM
02/12/19 06:58 PM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,146
Midwest USA
Stubbie Offline
Gold Subscriber
Stubbie  Offline
Gold Subscriber

Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,146
Midwest USA
Has the parent (OP) ever sat in on lessons? If so, what goes on?

Does the teacher know that the parent is essentially teaching the child by rote during the week, rather than have the child struggle to learn and play notes?


[Linked Image]
In summer, the song sings itself. --William Carlos Williams
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: AZNpiano] #2814228
02/12/19 07:27 PM
02/12/19 07:27 PM
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
South Florida
G
Gary D. Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Gary D.  Offline
6000 Post Club Member
G

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
South Florida
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Wow, this sounds like those Transfer Wrecks I keep getting.

If your daughter is still learning by rote after two years of lessons, it's time to change teachers.

BINGO! One of my best kids came to me that way. Could not read at all, scared of the last teacher. She and her mother both thought they were failures.

It is unfortunately normal in my area for parents to start their kids with teachers who know nothing and only do damage.


Piano Teacher
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2814377
02/13/19 03:06 AM
02/13/19 03:06 AM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
AZNpiano Offline
7000 Post Club Member
AZNpiano  Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
Originally Posted by parent_helper
Since we have a contract with the teacher, changing teacher is not an option at the moment.

You got duped into one of those semester systems?

Oh, Lordy.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: Gary D.] #2814382
02/13/19 03:19 AM
02/13/19 03:19 AM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
AZNpiano Offline
7000 Post Club Member
AZNpiano  Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,985
Orange County, CA
Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Wow, this sounds like those Transfer Wrecks I keep getting.

If your daughter is still learning by rote after two years of lessons, it's time to change teachers.

BINGO! One of my best kids came to me that way. Could not read at all, scared of the last teacher. She and her mother both thought they were failures.

It is unfortunately normal in my area for parents to start their kids with teachers who know nothing and only do damage.

This is why I keep on referring to all those Transfer Wrecks. I haven't had a good transfer student in FOUR YEARS. It's literally one wreck after another, with various degrees of damage.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: Stubbie] #2814384
02/13/19 03:58 AM
02/13/19 03:58 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,701
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,701
Canada
Originally Posted by Stubbie
Has the parent (OP) ever sat in on lessons? If so, what goes on?

Does the teacher know that the parent is essentially teaching the child by rote during the week, rather than have the child struggle to learn and play notes?

It is my impression that the teacher is "teaching" (if you can call it that) the child by rote, and the parent is trying to compensate for what is missing. One does not compensate for poor teaching - one goes and finds a competent teacher.

A child should not "struggle" to learn and play notes. A child should be taught how to read music, how to approach a piece of music, in stages, and then there is no struggle. Only intelligent effort. With a young child it is also a good idea if the teacher ........ one who teaches, rather than one who plays a piece through to be imitated ...... guides the parent in how to work with the child at home, what to do, what not to do.

Consider this: 3 new pieces a week. 30 minute lesson. 7 - 10 minutes gone for coming in, getting out books, packing up, leaving. If the teacher plays the piece and the student then plays the piece - that is maybe 23 minutes for the three pieces = 7.5 minutes per piece .... which each of them playing,that is 3 1/4 minutes for the teacher, then the student to play those pieces. What kind of teaching can go on in that kind of scenario?

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: AZNpiano] #2814385
02/13/19 04:00 AM
02/13/19 04:00 AM
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
South Florida
G
Gary D. Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Gary D.  Offline
6000 Post Club Member
G

Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 6,521
South Florida
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Wow, this sounds like those Transfer Wrecks I keep getting.

If your daughter is still learning by rote after two years of lessons, it's time to change teachers.

BINGO! One of my best kids came to me that way. Could not read at all, scared of the last teacher. She and her mother both thought they were failures.

It is unfortunately normal in my area for parents to start their kids with teachers who know nothing and only do damage.

This is why I keep on referring to all those Transfer Wrecks. I haven't had a good transfer student in FOUR YEARS. It's literally one wreck after another, with various degrees of damage.

As you know this is something you and I agree on 100%. I tell my students, "I know it sounds arrogant. It sounds like I'm the only person who knows how to teach. I'm sure there are other good teachers around, but I'll never get their students because they are good teachers. The only time I get a decent transfer student is when someone moves here from another country or another state."

If there are good teachers in your area, you know who they are. Their students will not come to you to fix damage.

But the rest of them, good GOD, no matter how much I talk about it, it's worse than I tell people here. My only chance with these wrecks is if I get them after only a few months or maybe a year. Then perhaps I have time to undo the damage.


Piano Teacher
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2814459
02/13/19 09:23 AM
02/13/19 09:23 AM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,715
Boynton Beach, FL
Morodiene Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Morodiene  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 16,715
Boynton Beach, FL
Originally Posted by parent_helper
Hello Piano Teachers,

I am the parent of a 7 year old who is currently learning Faber Adventures 3A. My child requires a lot of help from me each week to sit next to her and count the beats out for her. She gets 3 pieces per week as homework, and cannot sight reading them on her own. Her teacher does not have time to get through all 3 pieces during the 30 minute lesson because she has trouble playing through the pieces after her teacher plays them for her. When we get home, we go through the pieces very slowly one hand at a time until she can play them herself and count on her own. This has gone on for almost 2 years now (starting from prep level). She can read notes ones at a time, but does not fully understand that left hand and right hand work do different things.

My question is, does this mean the piano is not for her? Am I not helping her the right way? Should she quit? Should I be forcing her to sight read everything (tried that, she did not know what to do when she is not told what to do). Or is learning by rote a perfectly fine way to learn to play? After practicing 100 times per piece and counting it out very slowly, she can play pretty well. Is that good enough?

The reason I am concerned is, her teacher is starting to get impatient with her, and that brought me a lot of stress. I used to think it'll take as a long as it takes. But now it seems like I am just a crutch.

Please advise and thanks in advance.

Thanks

I concur with everyone else here, but I do question if the teacher knows what's going on at home, like Stubbie suggested. I have had students that make very good progress and so I keep advancing them to harder music, not knowing that the parent at home is actually doing all the work for them. I had one students whose parent could play piano who was teaching her daughter by rote at home, thinking she was helping her. When I found out, however, I explained that she was actually being a crutch for her daughter who couldn't really read the music at the level she was playing. We had to take a big step back, and eventually the daughter quit. The experience, unfortunately, ruined piano for her when she realized she'd have to work.

I'm sure there were some other issues involved, but I learned that I need to educate parents on how to be the best assistant for their child's progress without being detrimental. So I would have a talk with this teacher and let her know what's going on, tell her that it's getting increasingly difficult because she can't read, and request that you move back a bit - perhaps a lower level in another method book - to work her reading skills up to the level of her playing skills.

You also need to have a talk with your daughter about this to let her know why she'll be taking a step back. Another thing to consider, however, is that this has been to her probably some wonderful parent/child time together, and you don't want to suddenly disappear and make piano learning a lonely experience. Work with her, but more observing and asking her questions on what she could do to fix a problem. Try not to give any answers or suggestions, but let her struggle a bit to figure it out until she can ask her teacher. Just be encouraging of her progress, even if it seems very slow to begin.


private piano/voice teacher FT

[Linked Image][Linked Image][Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: Gary D.] #2814530
02/13/19 12:42 PM
02/13/19 12:42 PM
Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 65
M
mostlystrings Offline
Full Member
mostlystrings  Offline
Full Member
M

Joined: Feb 2018
Posts: 65
Originally Posted by Gary D.
"I know it sounds arrogant. It sounds like I'm the only person who knows how to teach. I'm sure there are other good teachers around, but I'll never get their students because they are good teachers. The only time I get a decent transfer student is when someone moves here from another country or another state."

Gary - thank you for this, I didn't know these were the words I needed but know now that I've seen them!

Re: question from a parent helping a young piano student [Re: parent_helper] #2814544
02/13/19 01:00 PM
02/13/19 01:00 PM
Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,179
C
Candywoman Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Candywoman  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
C

Joined: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,179
If I were you I'd switch piano teachers and consider the last few months of money a loss.

Since you are not switching, I would buy a book like Leila Fletcher Book One, and start teaching at page 11, The Boatman. Your child will understand that if there are three notes, one is the high one, one is the medium one, and one is the low one. (E, D, C)

Really you should not really read every note. You read one note and then you decide if the next one is a step of a second away or a skip of a third. Also, if it is up or down.

The music should be easy enough that there are no fourths. You need to relate the next note to the current note without saying letters.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  Ken Knapp 

Shop Our Online Store!
Shop Our Store Online
Shop PianoSupplies.com

Did you know Piano World has an online store, and that it's loaded with goodies pianists and music lovers want?
Check it out and place your order.

Special Purchase!
Keyboard and Roses Piano Bench Cushion Keyboard & Roses 14"x30" piano bench cushions Regularly sold for $79 to $100, now only $39. (while supplies last)

(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways
New Topics - Multiple Forums
LX series: volume difference
by PianoStartsAt33. 04/25/19 07:21 AM
Ravenscroft 275 Latency
by jamiecw. 04/25/19 05:11 AM
Most 'authentic' weighted action in a DP?
by BigIslandGuy. 04/25/19 03:10 AM
Pianos Had a Workout Saturday
by astrotoy. 04/24/19 11:54 PM
What's Hot!!
PIANO TEACHERS Please read this!
-------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics191,656
Posts2,821,601
Members93,145
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

Sweetwater

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.2