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Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2810514
02/04/19 10:36 AM
02/04/19 10:36 AM
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Hi AnthonyPaulO and welcome.

When learning to play you have to remember to enjoy the journey. I have met many piano students who "just wanted to play XYZ" (one or more pieces) and what they all had in common was that they quit early. That is a pity. When I first took lessons, that was in the end of the 70's and first half of the 80's, I was indeed more motivated to learn more than "playing Für Elise" etcetera. But still, piano pedagogy was not perhaps what it is today and I although I got proper teaching, I was not taught HOW TO PRACTICE and I quickly adapted the common belief that playing is fun, but practicing is boring. There I also abandoned the ideas of pursuing a pianist career. Playing scales all day was not my idea of having fun, despite that I loved my piano and also loved piano music.

In 2012 I started again, now some decades older and wiser, and I was determined not to let it be a whimsical phase again. I read a lot about piano practicing and playing and I also like to study the art of learning itself, the psychology behind it and so on. When I realized that the journey itself was the best part of it, practice never got boring again. I mean, why do people play computer games? To finish them as fast as possible? Are not the challenges and the problem solving entertaining as such? If all we want from piano playing is the ability to perform something flawlessly, then why bother with all that practice, when you can just buy yourself a concert ticket and go enjoying someone who already has done all the hard work? I can listen to a CD if I want a perfect performance. But I happen to like the challenge, I tell my family members that learning is very much like playing a difficult computer game. If something goes wrong, I must find out what, and then find a solution. But the reward is also more than gaining a bucket full of points and go from level 42 to 43. There are moments when I truly enjoy the music I make with my own hands, especially if I get the chance to play on a concert grand in perfect shape - at home my dear digital has to do and it is a nice instrument too, a high-end instrument with properly weighed keys and half-pedal function and a nice baby grand enclosure. But the big concert grands are absolutely wonderful.

I also know there are people who want to master the piano just to show off. Good for them, but I believe there are better and easier ways. I have no need of approval, I will be 53 next month and I don't care about the opinion of others anymore. I am so happy to have piano playing in my life nowadays, it helps me through hard times, it is MY time, my thing, and it will be my faithful friend forever. (Or until I get dementia, at least.) When I listen to a good recital or play myself, I forget all about my ego, about my personal life, my personal issues ... I just get immensed in the musical experience and I feel happy.


To have the best journey possible, I first ask you to forget all about comparisons. Don't give a **** about how others proceed. I have seen plenty of self-appointed prodigies who love to brag about how fast they learn things and then they indeed prove that they have fast fingers and they don't seem to be aware that they DO NOT UNDERSTAND THE MUSIC AT ALL. How fast your learn things is irrelevant . When you go to a concert, no matter what genre, you don't ask how much time they needed to learn this. You just want to hear the end result. So while the journey is interesting to the pianist, it is uninteresting to the audience. Yes, I have also heard prodigies play beautifully and then I admire the beautiful music - I am still not interesting in knowing how fast they mastered this. When you see these guys who learned to play advanced music in just a year etcetera, it may seem very impressing but you know what? After this achievement they will be judged like everyone else who are at their level. They cannot walk out on stage or participate in competitions, shouting "heeeey, I have only studied piano for a year!" That gives no bonus points.

But OK, effective learning is definitely more fun than uneffective dito. I believe that the biggest enemy we all have is impatience. We want to learn fast, so we skip over the mistakes, hope they will vanish by themselves, we play too fast and too long sections because we think that will speed up the learning. Actually it is the opposite. Be patient, work in small, small portions and learn to master them before you proceed. Play slowly enough to be sure what you are doing and also feel that you are in total control.

Then - don't be afraid of making mistakes. Some students think that every mistake is a "failure", something that must not happen, a proof that they suck. No, they are not. To a mountain climber they are indeed lethal, but to a pianist they are friends. They point at the things you need to work with. So. Deal with them, one by one (not ten by ten). Listen to your body - if you start to feel fatigue or pain while you practice, you must stop and find ways to overcome the issues. Again, don't worry about how fast you proceed compared to others. Your relation to the piano is like a love relation, it has to develop in its own pace and in the way that suits YOU.

Keep on learning notes and music theory. It is not difficult at all, so there is simply no excuse for NOT learning to read music, unless you have a special disability. Once you know how to do, you can learn music however you like, but there is no reason not to get this tool in your possession.

Then, go to recitals and concerts, listen to music, read about music, try out pianos, hang out with piano enthusiasts and pianists, enter the world of piano and know it is yours. Have fun!

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Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2810666
02/04/19 04:09 PM
02/04/19 04:09 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
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@ghosthand amazing reply, very inspiring! Thank you!!

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2810704
02/04/19 05:02 PM
02/04/19 05:02 PM
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Posts: 118
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ghosthand that was well written and pretty much how I feel. I'm playing for fun and enjoyment. This is my hobby. Some people play golf or bridge and while they never get to be an expert at it they enjoy it. I feel the same about Piano.

I like the computer game comparison. I have a game controller with 88 keys and the when I press the right keys at the correct time then beautiful (beginner) music comes out.

Quote
I tell my family members that learning is very much like playing a difficult computer game. If something goes wrong, I must find out what, and then find a solution. But the reward is also more than gaining a bucket full of points and go from level 42 to 43. There are moments when I truly enjoy the music I make with my own hands,


Started Playing October 1, 2017. First Lesson Oct. 17, 2017. Currently in Faber Piano Adventures Book 3a. Yamaha P-115.
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Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: cmb13] #2811050
02/05/19 02:46 PM
02/05/19 02:46 PM
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Amassing repertoire is more efficient (Top-down processing) than trying to perfect each piece on first trial.

technique/memory => performance (80%) => forgetting => re-learning/polishing => technique/memory => performance (90%)

Forgetting is important for long-term memory consolidation and improving technique/quality.

Roger Chaffin, Gabriela Imreh, Mary Crawford ~ Practicing Perfection Memory and Piano Performance.

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: baudelairepianist] #2811092
02/05/19 04:51 PM
02/05/19 04:51 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 4,257
Pennsylvania
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dmd Offline
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Originally Posted by baudelairepianist
Amassing repertoire is more efficient (Top-down processing) than trying to perfect each piece on first trial.

technique/memory => performance (80%) => forgetting => re-learning/polishing => technique/memory => performance (90%)

Forgetting is important for long-term memory consolidation and improving technique/quality.

Roger Chaffin, Gabriela Imreh, Mary Crawford ~ Practicing Perfection Memory and Piano Performance.



That may all be perfectly true.

However, in my opinion …. until I hear a "polished" piece of music from you ….. it is all just theory.

As they say …. the proof is in the puddin'.

And the "puddin'" is a completed polished piece of music.

Otherwise, what is the point of all that "efficiency" ?


Don

Kawai MP11SE, Focal CMS 40 Powered Monitors, SennHeiser HD 555 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814021
02/12/19 10:45 AM
02/12/19 10:45 AM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
AnthonyPaulO Offline OP
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New York, NY, USA
Okay, so I've been spending my time learning up some music theory and trying to memorize the treble scale. I started practicing the treble scale by using an app called "Music Tutor" which lets you pick which parts of the scale to drill on. At the top they present a scale of notes and on the bottom they have a single octave set of keys from C to G, and I've been practicing on this. Then I tried another app called "Piano Notes" and found that it has a two octave set of keys and that this more accurately reflects the real world since in the first app I hit the same key for, say, a bass C and a treble C, which I had to get out of the habit of doing when presented with a fuller set of keys in the second app. So I practiced on this for a while and then I tried it out and home and realized that while it served me well for helping memorize the scale it did nothing for muscle memory since on the iPhone app I use a single digit finger to hit the notes. So now I'm practicing having my thumbs on the mid C and the other fingers on their respective keys. However, I notice in Faber's book that it's switching me to another scheme (not sure what to call it) where your left hand pinky rests on the bass C whereas before the left thumb was on mid C. So now I'm thinking, wait a second... is there any value at all gaining muscle memory that associates fingers to certain keys given that it will shift at any time? I don't see my teacher until Thursday so I'm wondering what the right thing to do is. Should I try and train my right hand thumb to remember it's Mid C, and the next finger D, the middle finger E, etc...? Or should I try to think of it in relative terms instead, that is, try to know what finger is what depending on where the thumb is?

So confused...

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814031
02/12/19 11:24 AM
02/12/19 11:24 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 4,257
Pennsylvania
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dmd Offline
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Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
...So confused...


I wish there was some way of convincing you that doing those "extra" things (not assigned by your teacher) is not going to result in you moving along "faster". In fact, it might hinder you in that you may spend time doing that stuff instead of more time on your lessons.


But … here goes ….

Please spend your time perfecting the material assigned by your teacher and take pride in doing that instead of being distracted by "in depth" material you find here and there. In my opinion, that is the best plan for effectively gaining skill at playing piano.

Good Luck


Don

Kawai MP11SE, Focal CMS 40 Powered Monitors, SennHeiser HD 555 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814032
02/12/19 11:26 AM
02/12/19 11:26 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,550
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content


Joined: Apr 2018
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Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
Okay, so I've been spending my time learning up some music theory and trying to memorize the treble scale. I started practicing the treble scale by using an app called "Music Tutor" which lets you pick which parts of the scale to drill on. At the top they present a scale of notes and on the bottom they have a single octave set of keys from C to G, and I've been practicing on this. Then I tried another app called "Piano Notes" and found that it has a two octave set of keys and that this more accurately reflects the real world since in the first app I hit the same key for, say, a bass C and a treble C, which I had to get out of the habit of doing when presented with a fuller set of keys in the second app. So I practiced on this for a while and then I tried it out and home and realized that while it served me well for helping memorize the scale it did nothing for muscle memory since on the iPhone app I use a single digit finger to hit the notes. So now I'm practicing having my thumbs on the mid C and the other fingers on their respective keys. However, I notice in Faber's book that it's switching me to another scheme (not sure what to call it) where your left hand pinky rests on the bass C whereas before the left thumb was on mid C. So now I'm thinking, wait a second... is there any value at all gaining muscle memory that associates fingers to certain keys given that it will shift at any time? I don't see my teacher until Thursday so I'm wondering what the right thing to do is. Should I try and train my right hand thumb to remember it's Mid C, and the next finger D, the middle finger E, etc...? Or should I try to think of it in relative terms instead, that is, try to know what finger is what depending on where the thumb is?

So confused...

Check this thread I started last year on such issues. Personally, since that time, I found a systematic approach to be most helpful in improving my reading skills. See this post and the next two after.


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: dmd] #2814037
02/12/19 11:33 AM
02/12/19 11:33 AM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
AnthonyPaulO Offline OP
AnthonyPaulO  Offline OP


Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
Originally Posted by dmd
Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
...So confused...


I wish there was some way of convincing you that doing those "extra" things (not assigned by your teacher) is not going to result in you moving along "faster". In fact, it might hinder you in that you may spend time doing that stuff instead of more time on your lessons.


But … here goes ….

Please spend your time perfecting the material assigned by your teacher and take pride in doing that instead of being distracted by "in depth" material you find here and there. In my opinion, that is the best plan for effectively gaining skill at playing piano.

Good Luck



She hasn't assigned me anything yet because I was still waiting for the Faber book to arrive. In the meantime I'm trying to be productive. I'm aware that without guidance I may develop bad habits which is why I've focused on memorizing the scale, surely there's no harm in this? I'd also like to practice the memorization I've learned, but before I commit to anything physical which will develop bad habits I've come here first to ask questions.

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814043
02/12/19 11:48 AM
02/12/19 11:48 AM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
AnthonyPaulO Offline OP
AnthonyPaulO  Offline OP


Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
Okay, so I've been spending my time learning up some music theory and trying to memorize the treble scale. I started practicing the treble scale by using an app called "Music Tutor" which lets you pick which parts of the scale to drill on. At the top they present a scale of notes and on the bottom they have a single octave set of keys from C to G, and I've been practicing on this. Then I tried another app called "Piano Notes" and found that it has a two octave set of keys and that this more accurately reflects the real world since in the first app I hit the same key for, say, a bass C and a treble C, which I had to get out of the habit of doing when presented with a fuller set of keys in the second app. So I practiced on this for a while and then I tried it out and home and realized that while it served me well for helping memorize the scale it did nothing for muscle memory since on the iPhone app I use a single digit finger to hit the notes. So now I'm practicing having my thumbs on the mid C and the other fingers on their respective keys. However, I notice in Faber's book that it's switching me to another scheme (not sure what to call it) where your left hand pinky rests on the bass C whereas before the left thumb was on mid C. So now I'm thinking, wait a second... is there any value at all gaining muscle memory that associates fingers to certain keys given that it will shift at any time? I don't see my teacher until Thursday so I'm wondering what the right thing to do is. Should I try and train my right hand thumb to remember it's Mid C, and the next finger D, the middle finger E, etc...? Or should I try to think of it in relative terms instead, that is, try to know what finger is what depending on where the thumb is?

So confused...

Check this thread I started last year on such issues. Personally, since that time, I found a systematic approach to be most helpful in improving my reading skills. See this post and the next two after.


Thanks Tyrone I'll check this out!

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: dmd] #2814046
02/12/19 11:53 AM
02/12/19 11:53 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,550
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content


Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,550
Originally Posted by dmd
Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
...So confused...

I wish there was some way of convincing you that doing those "extra" things (not assigned by your teacher) is not going to result in you moving along "faster".

Broad generalization. In fact so broad as to be false.

Applied to conventional learning, this would say that all students learn best sitting in their classroom listening to their teacher and doing what their teacher told them to do. Except we know that isn't true. I myself opted out of my entire middle school and high school program of mathematics and instead went and studied graduate school level math in my teenage years instead. All people are different and depending on the specific things which someone is trying to do, it may or may not be effective. I would say that trying to learn to play piano by oneself is something I tried and it proved to not be effective for me. Learning music theory on my own is proving surprisingly effective. Learning sight reading in the case of AnthonyPaulO could also be effective. I am essentially doing that right now, as I get some guidance from my teacher on my sight reading studies (she assigned the workbook series) but I am doing them myself so that our lesson time can be more focused on the actual learning to play aspects.

Originally Posted by dmd
In fact, it might hinder you in that you may spend time doing that stuff instead of more time on your lessons.

This is very possibly true, but you don't know since AnthonyPaulO has not said how much time he is allocating to his lessons and homework resulting from lessons, nor has he said if studying sight-reading on his own is taking time which he would otherwise spend on his lessons or homework if he weren't trying to learn sight-reading on his own.

Originally Posted by dmd
But … here goes ….

Please spend your time perfecting the material assigned by your teacher and take pride in doing that instead of being distracted by "in depth" material you find here and there. In my opinion, that is the best plan for effectively gaining skill at playing piano.

Good Luck

Needless to say, as mentioned above, I completely disagree as I had a school principal that sounded like you and would not let me graduate early from my school so I could go to college. Fortunately the chairman of the math department of the university decided that I didn't need a school diploma to attend the university and in fact encouraged me to bail out of school by waiving the tuition. Everyone learns differently. AnthonyPaulO has already pointed out in this thread that he is different from the majority (I'm waiting for his universal beverage maker to be commercialized, myself... LOL). I think he should be able to decide what helps him to learn piano and what doesn't, and old saws about listening to one's teacher and being attentive in one's lessons can stay in the closet as he is perfectly capable of deciding when it benefits him to be attentive and learn from his teacher and when it benefits him to "branch out."


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814059
02/12/19 12:23 PM
02/12/19 12:23 PM
Joined: Jun 2018
Posts: 272
Sweden
Animisha Online content
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I agree with everything Tyrone wrote above!

And I want to add, as a beginner, I have just had reason to think through the choice of sticking more with one teaching or mixing in other teachers and other material. I find that it is clearly enriching to drink from many sources. As bennevis pointed out to me, in the beginning you learn the basics: natural arm, hand & wrist movements, nice gently curved fingers, etc. Different teachers and different materials all take a different tack at these, and sometimes your teacher might explain to you something that you don't quite get, and then you watch a video of another teacher and suddenly you have an epiphany - aha, now I understand!


It is a happy talent to know how to play.
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814065
02/12/19 12:34 PM
02/12/19 12:34 PM
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Posts: 38
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Hi Anthony, I started two years ago with Alfred's all in one and did it all wrong, my approach, my expectation.. rushed it... did not work out. In Jan I got the Fabers Piano Adventure and so far I am doing good taking my time and not getting into any rush at all.... Oh, and I'm 56.

Last edited by Agfinguy; 02/12/19 12:36 PM.

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Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814512
02/13/19 11:16 AM
02/13/19 11:16 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
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Hong Kong
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RichardHK Online content
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Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
... ...She did, however, at the very beginning before even testing me, dash my dreams of seeing how fast I can do fur Elise like that guy in the video at 3 weeks; I was really looking forward to that challenge even though I know it’s unrealistic. She said that there’s more to just learning to play those notes, ... ...and that fur Elise would be something that should be tackled around the 2 year mark ...


Hi Anthony,

I have read the whole thread and picked up this early message for a comment. Not sure I would be happy taking lessons and being told the above. Especially for an adult learner like you (and me).

Fur Elize is an easy piece relative to most other piano pieces in the first 1-2 years and if you want to play it you should. Where I live, if you venture into any music store you will often hear some little kid playing Fur Elize! Can drive you nuts, but lovely to hear..

Anyway, to help pursue your dream you might be interested in this Tomplay version that will allow you to practice separate hands, slow it down, etc. Given your enthusiasm I am sure you will get it down pretty soon.

https://tomplay.com/piano-sheet-music/beethoven/f-r-elise-piano-score

For inspiration, here's a video of a typical tot playing the tune. smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xrkq-yBVcQQ

Never give up. Never surrender! (Galaxy Quest must-see movie quote.)

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: RichardHK] #2814635
02/13/19 02:26 PM
02/13/19 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by RichardHK
Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
... ...She did, however, at the very beginning before even testing me, dash my dreams of seeing how fast I can do fur Elise like that guy in the video at 3 weeks; I was really looking forward to that challenge even though I know it’s unrealistic. She said that there’s more to just learning to play those notes, ... ...and that fur Elise would be something that should be tackled around the 2 year mark ...


Hi Anthony,

I have read the whole thread and picked up this early message for a comment. Not sure I would be happy taking lessons and being told the above. Especially for an adult learner like you (and me).

Fur Elize is an easy piece relative to most other piano pieces in the first 1-2 years and if you want to play it you should.

Anyway, to help pursue your dream you might be interested in this Tomplay version that will allow you to practice separate hands, slow it down, etc. Given your enthusiasm I am sure you will get it down pretty soon.


Never give up. Never surrender! (Galaxy Quest must-see movie quote.)

No wonder teachers despair of teaching adult beginners (have a look at the Piano Teachers Forum).

You have to make up your mind: Do you want to learn to play piano properly, or do you just want to be able to show off (Look! I learnt to play Für Elise from scratch in two weeks from being a complete beginner!), just because you believe what some YT "pianists" claim to have done. Do you believe everything on YT?

If you want to develop really bad habits (which will take a good teacher months if not years to correct - if you eventually want to play properly), develop lots of tension (from forcing your fingers to do stuff they just can't do, because the movements are so utterly foreign) and possibly injury.......and then give up piano (after you've done your YT video and boasted about your exploits) because - why would you persist with something that causes lots of pain and aggravation and yet you can't play a simple piece like Für Elise like that whizz-kid on YT, with your rhythms all over the place (assuming you realise it) and random notes sticking out like bulldozers because you have no control over your fingers and......


Rant over & out. You're an adult - do as you please.......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: bennevis] #2814661
02/13/19 03:07 PM
02/13/19 03:07 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,550
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
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Originally Posted by bennevis
If you want to develop really bad habits (which will take a good teacher months if not years to correct - if you eventually want to play properly), develop lots of tension (from forcing your fingers to do stuff they just can't do, because the movements are so utterly foreign) and possibly injury.......and then give up piano (after you've done your YT video and boasted about your exploits) because - why would you persist with something that causes lots of pain and aggravation and yet you can't play a simple piece like Für Elise like that whizz-kid on YT, with your rhythms all over the place (assuming you realise it) and random notes sticking out like bulldozers because you have no control over your fingers and......

I just saw this video on Reddit r/piano yesterday and my hands hurt just watching how much tension his hands had. Since he said this is the hardest piece he ever attempted, I'm guessing this is something like the third piece he has ever played in his life smile


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: bennevis] #2814665
02/13/19 03:15 PM
02/13/19 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis

No wonder teachers despair of teaching adult beginners (have a look at the Piano Teachers Forum).



Indeed! I made the mistake of wandering over there a few days ago... :scream

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: bennevis] #2814778
02/13/19 06:12 PM
02/13/19 06:12 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 424
Virginia
D
DFSRN Offline
Full Member
DFSRN  Offline
Full Member
D

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 424
Virginia
Bennevis, I totally agree with you. People need to learn the basics and progress from the fundamentals if they are expecting to play well. Those interested in learning chords just to play songs there are books and videos which would be more cost effective than paying for lessons. Depending on a persons goals what path a person may take. Nothing wrong with just wanting to play, For me, I would like to play well and realize it is a lot of work and expense. My teacher pin points bad habits. He has backed track some, because my counting is not what it should be at this time so I am back to easier music. Even as a child I can remember counting piano music was difficult for me, the violin was only one line to count. He said I was advanced in playing more difficult music, but the counting is off. He makes me count out loud for my 2 hour lesson. He will start out and say see if you can count to yourself, It does not last long. Counting is getting better, if I count wrong he corrects it right away.

I guess, I have been a student myself so long that I am use to taking direction from teachers. If I was an expert in this field of piano music I could intelligently debate issues, since I am not I follow direction and I am progressing. There is really no short cut to playing well, you have to study, practice, and put in time. I understand it is not for everyone. I can't imagine life without learning the piano, it has become part of who I am and one of my life goals.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814833
02/13/19 08:44 PM
02/13/19 08:44 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
AnthonyPaulO Offline OP
AnthonyPaulO  Offline OP


Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 38
New York, NY, USA
Thanks to everyone who's replied with advice and resources, I have learned a lot so far regarding how I should approach my training. I have given up my Quixotic attempt at competing with the youtube guy; in fact, the first few posts and some google research was enough to change my mind. The rest of the advice since then has served to help steer me as far as how to approach learning. I am definitely not taking any shortcuts, and Tyrone's links regarding relative fingering and learning best-practices have been particularly helpful. For example, I am now very much inclined to go at a slower pace and be extremely aware when it comes to making mistakes during practice since each mistake can create new neuron connections and muscle memory and you will need to invest more time to undo that, so it's better to take it slow and minimize mistakes as much as possible and get it right the first time and subsequent times as much as possible.

I've got to say though, just going through reading music theory and memorizing the Treble scale and seeing how much is actually involved in playing the piano and knowing that this is just the tip of the iceberg is a humbling experience; I am simply amazed and in awe that humans have been able to master all this and be able to sight-read and play with two hands over this enormous 8-octave range instrument when you have only 10 fingers and do so in real-time. I had no idea what went into it, I still have no idea the full extent of it, but the little I am aware of so far has blown my mind. I really should have started this in the womb. Alas, I am no longer that spring chicken of yore...

Re: Inspired to learn! Need advice on approach [Re: AnthonyPaulO] #2814842
02/13/19 09:00 PM
02/13/19 09:00 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,550
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content


Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,550
Originally Posted by AnthonyPaulO
I really should have started this in the womb. Alas, I am no longer that spring chicken of yore...

Yeah, if he can't make it, what hope does one have who hasn't started in the womb?


across the stone, deathless piano performances
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