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Classical Piano Method by Heumann #2807734
01/28/19 11:46 AM
01/28/19 11:46 AM
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 179
Montuno Offline OP
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Montuno  Offline OP
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Hi all,

I recently started using this method (coming from Fundamental Keys and - previously Alfred's). Anyone else who is using his method and want to share opinions/experiences?

Cheers,
Montuno

Ps: if there is interest I would be willing to share my first impressions here.


Casio Privia PX-150 - Pianoteq
Working on Fundamental Keys / Alfred's Adult All-In-One Book 2

My Music
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Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2807858
01/28/19 03:25 PM
01/28/19 03:25 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,072
In the Ozarks of Missouri
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NobleHouse  Online Content
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Joined: Jan 2018
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In the Ozarks of Missouri
Of course provide your thoughts!


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Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2808044
01/29/19 01:32 AM
01/29/19 01:32 AM
Joined: Jan 2018
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LadyAcadia Offline
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Beautiful! I'm listening to your music with ear buds so as not keep hubby awake. My favorites so far are Solitude, Amazing Grace & Wonderland. I just bookmarked the link, so I can listen to it again and again.

Thank you so much for sharing! 😊


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Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: LadyAcadia] #2808104
01/29/19 07:36 AM
01/29/19 07:36 AM
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 179
Montuno Offline OP
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Originally Posted by LadyAcadia
Beautiful! I'm listening to your music with ear buds so as not keep hubby awake. My favorites so far are Solitude, Amazing Grace & Wonderland. I just bookmarked the link, so I can listen to it again and again.

Thank you so much for sharing! 😊


Thank you so much for your kind words. You made my day! grin


Casio Privia PX-150 - Pianoteq
Working on Fundamental Keys / Alfred's Adult All-In-One Book 2

My Music
Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2808182
01/29/19 11:42 AM
01/29/19 11:42 AM
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 179
Montuno Offline OP
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In order to put my opinion - which is more of a first impression - of the method in context it helps if I tell a little bit about my background. I started to play piano about 3 years ago, an adult self-learner. My first book was the Alfred Adult 1 (thanks to the inspiration I got from this site). Because I am mostly interested in classical piano music I also purchased the Fundamental Keys book and videos which I absolutely loved.

Two years ago I had to take a long break because of a nerve injury (not related to piano playing) in my right hand. A while after I recovered I started to play again, basically from scratch since I had to redevelop the touch of my right hand playing. The good: I was able to get back to my previous level and enjoy playing again. The bad: I just couldn't find the same motivation to work really hard on my piano playing that I had before. I learned some new pieces, but lacked the structured practice that I had before.

Recently I finally got that motivation back and I start to make progress again. But I wanted some new training material to get me further. The Alfred method is not appealing to me anymore - before the injury I had started on Alfred 2, but I have to admit I lost interest in much of the selection of music.

I started to like Fundamental Keys a bit less as well. The first part of the book is highly recommended, and the videos were invaluable for me as a self learner. The videos only go to about halfway in the book however. And the text in the book becomes sparse as well in the second half. So I was looking for another method book. A book that is based on classical music and is aimed at adults. And that would give more guidance.

So I discovered the Classical Piano Method and I really liked the first looks and selection of pieces. And the (sparse) reviews of the method where all very positive. I started with Method book 1 - which is a step back for me, but that is okay. I can move through the book quickly and get back into a good practice regime. And The big plus are the finger fitness exercises.

The pieces in the first method book are a combination of classical pieces in arrangements by Heumann and Heumann originals. I am normally not a big fan of simplified arrangements, but it works surprisingly well here. Repertoire Collection 1 (which I don't own) has more of the same but also some 'modern classics'. The book starts at a brisk pace which is perfect for me but could be a challenge for absolute beginners unless they supplement.

The book is really well organised and looks great. One thing I love is that Heumann gives each composer a short introduction. There are also theory exercises throughout. One minor issue: I would have liked that the pieces would have been explained a bit more, for instance the mood, theme etc. In the second half of the piece (amongst others) triads are introduced and you are asked to transpose pieces, excellent.

The second book introduces the movement of the hands around the keyboard. This book also makes use of original scores (i think it is about 1/3 originals, 1/3 arrangements, 1/3 Heumann pieces). It ends with the Prelude in C Major by Bach. Some of the topics I found while leafing through book 2 are: lots of scales (& triads), inversions, playing of melody & bass in one hand.

Also you learn to vary your accompaniment. For instance, the book contains the Cancan and the book gives you 5 patterns for the left hand to use. First separate, then back to back.

Each method book comes with a quality cd with all the pieces played. For beginners there is the extra fun of an accompaniment of the pieces in the first part of book 1, very nice to play along to.

The author (and reviewers) say that the method books can be well used on their own. But there are additional books that can help out. First there are Repertoire books, 1 per level. As expected they contain more pieces to use (for each book, the method book clearly indicates which pieces belong to each chapter). I don't own the level 1 Repertoire, but what I saw from level 2 looked really promising.

There are also Duet books (and extra books for Christmas) but the real standout for me are the exercise books called Finger Fitness. The method book contain a number of finger fitness exercises, but the extra material is just excellent. Great material to work on your technique, there are many exercises for technical challenges but also for evenness of playing etc. The first part of book 1 contains all Heumann material but at the end there are some pieces by other composers. And book 2 really shines with numerous practice pieces by Czerny, Burgsmüller, Beyer, Duvernoy, Gurlitt, some Hanon and more. This is outstanding practice/warmup material and looks like much more fun than just sticking to a single method (not looking forward to play Hanon every day wink

So all in all, I am quite impressed with what I have seen and experienced so far. Late beginners could step right into book 2, or if you come back to the piano use book 1 as a recap. For absolute beginners I would recommend combining this with another source, e.g. the first part of Fundamental Keys for instance has the best introductional part I have seen yet.


Casio Privia PX-150 - Pianoteq
Working on Fundamental Keys / Alfred's Adult All-In-One Book 2

My Music
Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2808260
01/29/19 03:27 PM
01/29/19 03:27 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,072
In the Ozarks of Missouri
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2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 2,072
In the Ozarks of Missouri
Originally Posted by Montuno
In order to put my opinion - which is more of a first impression - of the method in context it helps if I tell a little bit about my background. I started to play piano about 3 years ago, an adult self-learner. My first book was the Alfred Adult 1 (thanks to the inspiration I got from this site). Because I am mostly interested in classical piano music I also purchased the Fundamental Keys book and videos which I absolutely loved.

Two years ago I had to take a long break because of a nerve injury (not related to piano playing) in my right hand. A while after I recovered I started to play again, basically from scratch since I had to redevelop the touch of my right hand playing. The good: I was able to get back to my previous level and enjoy playing again. The bad: I just couldn't find the same motivation to work really hard on my piano playing that I had before. I learned some new pieces, but lacked the structured practice that I had before.

Recently I finally got that motivation back and I start to make progress again. But I wanted some new training material to get me further. The Alfred method is not appealing to me anymore - before the injury I had started on Alfred 2, but I have to admit I lost interest in much of the selection of music.

I started to like Fundamental Keys a bit less as well. The first part of the book is highly recommended, and the videos were invaluable for me as a self learner. The videos only go to about halfway in the book however. And the text in the book becomes sparse as well in the second half. So I was looking for another method book. A book that is based on classical music and is aimed at adults. And that would give more guidance.

So I discovered the Classical Piano Method and I really liked the first looks and selection of pieces. And the (sparse) reviews of the method where all very positive. I started with Method book 1 - which is a step back for me, but that is okay. I can move through the book quickly and get back into a good practice regime. And The big plus are the finger fitness exercises.

The pieces in the first method book are a combination of classical pieces in arrangements by Heumann and Heumann originals. I am normally not a big fan of simplified arrangements, but it works surprisingly well here. Repertoire Collection 1 (which I don't own) has more of the same but also some 'modern classics'. The book starts at a brisk pace which is perfect for me but could be a challenge for absolute beginners unless they supplement.

The book is really well organised and looks great. One thing I love is that Heumann gives each composer a short introduction. There are also theory exercises throughout. One minor issue: I would have liked that the pieces would have been explained a bit more, for instance the mood, theme etc. In the second half of the piece (amongst others) triads are introduced and you are asked to transpose pieces, excellent.

The second book introduces the movement of the hands around the keyboard. This book also makes use of original scores (i think it is about 1/3 originals, 1/3 arrangements, 1/3 Heumann pieces). It ends with the Prelude in C Major by Bach. Some of the topics I found while leafing through book 2 are: lots of scales (& triads), inversions, playing of melody & bass in one hand.

Also you learn to vary your accompaniment. For instance, the book contains the Cancan and the book gives you 5 patterns for the left hand to use. First separate, then back to back.

Each method book comes with a quality cd with all the pieces played. For beginners there is the extra fun of an accompaniment of the pieces in the first part of book 1, very nice to play along to.

The author (and reviewers) say that the method books can be well used on their own. But there are additional books that can help out. First there are Repertoire books, 1 per level. As expected they contain more pieces to use (for each book, the method book clearly indicates which pieces belong to each chapter). I don't own the level 1 Repertoire, but what I saw from level 2 looked really promising.

There are also Duet books (and extra books for Christmas) but the real standout for me are the exercise books called Finger Fitness. The method book contain a number of finger fitness exercises, but the extra material is just excellent. Great material to work on your technique, there are many exercises for technical challenges but also for evenness of playing etc. The first part of book 1 contains all Heumann material but at the end there are some pieces by other composers. And book 2 really shines with numerous practice pieces by Czerny, Burgsmüller, Beyer, Duvernoy, Gurlitt, some Hanon and more. This is outstanding practice/warmup material and looks like much more fun than just sticking to a single method (not looking forward to play Hanon every day wink

So all in all, I am quite impressed with what I have seen and experienced so far. Late beginners could step right into book 2, or if you come back to the piano use book 1 as a recap. For absolute beginners I would recommend combining this with another source, e.g. the first part of Fundamental Keys for instance has the best introductional part I have seen yet.



Very nice recap! Thanks, I will look at it further.


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Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2810707
02/04/19 06:18 PM
02/04/19 06:18 PM
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Orange County, California
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Coatimundi Offline
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Hi Montuno,

I noticed this thread a bit late, so not sure if you'll see my reply. I am working through Alfred's AIO, and Fundamental Keys in parallel as a self-learner, as you did at first (I'm also primarily interested in learning to play classical pieces). I started about 5 months ago. I'm curious how far along you were in those methods before you felt a need to change over -- I notice your signature mentions AIO book 2, which I'm nowhere near so far.

I'm also curious how you balanced working through the two methods in parallel. I feel like there's a good balance in different techniques getting focused on between the two, at least early on. It was simpler for me to make progress in them both earlier on though, with simpler music. I find now that I'm at a point where I kind of get stuck on a piece for a week or so at a time, and have to alternate between focusing on learning a piece in one of the methods and then move on to a new piece in the other. That allows me to progress in both, but I perhaps feel like I'm moving along at a slower pace that I would be focusing on one method -- however, this is all stuff I'll need to learn at some point, so I suppose it's not actually slower progress overall. Just curious if you have advice for someone following along with both these methods in the first months, as you've opted to go this route before.

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2811405
02/06/19 01:21 PM
02/06/19 01:21 PM
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Posts: 45
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Although I wanted to learn the piano all my life (denied as a child) it really came about in the last eighteen/twenty months. With a background in operatic choir and ballet, I can sight-sing and have no trouble with rhythm and tempo, plus I was familiar with piano observing pianists. I also played baroque music on the recorder forever. Self-taught I can pick out any melody that I have heard a number of times on the recorder and on the piano - one hand. Living in a remote and isolated area in the middle of Canada precludes travelling hours (especially in winter!) to get to the nearest teacher. It also means no cell, no TV, internet only by expensive satellite with poor service. It snowed for the last two days, so no internet.

I started with Alfred and soon discarded it (too much chord, too much arrangements, not enough classical), even though I had already bought books 2 and 3 (that's what you do when you live miles from anywhere). Classical music is my love. Online, I found Fundamental Keys, got the original book, no CD no video, but no problem. I think I got a little bored. I have good hand coordination it felt slow. Then I found Heuman's Classical Piano Method. Much the same and I zipped through book one and three-quarters of Fundamental Keys. Then life happens and it was several months before I came back to the piano. I acquired a LX7 - the only one they had in the only store in the city and I was not buying without trying. I had tinkered enough with the acoustic in my ballet studio to know what I wanted it to feel.

Now that I am back practicing I decided to go back to page one, book one, well not quite, about Heuman lesson 9, page 59 Kimenez, and work regularly. I practice one Heuman lesson, then the equivalent lesson in Fundamental Keys. From time to time I listen to the CD (Heuman) to check whether I have it right. I'm mindful of students who finding it easy go to fast and suddenly meet a wall. At the same time, since I used to sing Ave Maria, Gounod-Bach, I study the score and I think I play it decently. One of my (Russian) pianists used to play the first page of my favorite piece of all time, Für Elise, for adagio movements in class. I think every note is stuck into my brain, I can play that first page without notation. I'm resisting trying to play other familiar and beloved pieces.

I like the finger fitness in the lessons and will buy the book. For my birthday I bought essential repertoire, but pieces are not that easy and although I can more or less get through the baroque pieces I put it aside until I have completed Jimenez and Heuman book one.

I'm interested on how other self-taught using both Heuman and Jimenez work and feel.

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2812028
02/07/19 05:16 PM
02/07/19 05:16 PM
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Orange County, California
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Thanks for sharing your experience, Dreaming.

I understand where you're coming from with Alfred's -- lots of emphasis on left hand chords and right hand melody (though not exclusively), and for someone wanting to learn to play classical music, many of the pieces aren't very compelling. With that said, I've kept up with it, as I find each successive piece to be challenging and something I can't do initially, so I feel I am learning new and hopefully important skills as I move along in it.

As for Fundamental Keys, I've been using the same book as you, also without any recordings or video. I'm not quite up to where you've jumped back to (I've just gotten comfortable with the Minuetto by James Hook, and am moving on to the Gavotte by Handel). I feel like this has both been more challenging that Alfred's, but also a lot more rewarding, in terms of working towards eventually being able to play repertoire. I do sometimes wish that I had a bit more music at each stage before jumping to more challenging pieces, though, to get a bit more practice time in with concepts as I'm learning them. I don't have the kind of extensive musical background that you do, so I feel like I'm starting on all of this from much more of a position of deficit.

To that end, I've been hesitantly toying with the idea of adding in yet another method into my routine (like Heumann, or maybe Classics to Moderns -- in any case, something more focused on classical pieces). I'm really not sure how I'd juggle working through so much in parallel, though, as I already feel sometimes that working through two methods is making my progress in each individual one a bit slower.

Do you feel that working on Heumann and Jimenez together complement each other well? Do they tend to allow for more practice of the same skills, or fill gaps from one another?

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2812128
02/07/19 09:59 PM
02/07/19 09:59 PM
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Coatimundi, Both Heuman and Jimenez seemed to develop the same skills at about the same time in the method to start with, then Heuman is slower but I haven't gone far enough to really confirm that impression. I'd say they complement each other or perhaps reinforce each other skills. As I am getting more time to practice now, I go back to Alfred from time to time and select a piece that appeals to me. I use it as a study piece to warm up. For Heuman and Jimenez I will practice a piece until I have it right, and play it with enough fluidity with the same fingering. I try to use the prescribed fingering but something happens between my brain and the keys. My fingers have a life of their own. But when it works just fine, I keep my amended fingering.

Sometimes a lesson will have more pieces in one book than in the other for the same skills. Using both methods gives more variety to the practice. I also practice a scale or two to try to discipline my fingers smile

You mentioned being stuck on one piece. How do you practice a new piece? I don't know whether my way is any good, but with a new piece, I study the first bar and repeat it until I feel comfortable, then I tackle the second bar in the same manner, then I put both bars together till I can play them smoothly enough. Then I do the same with the third bar and play the three bars, and so on to the end of the piece - not necessarily on the same day, if fatigue sets in. Jimenez and Heuman have chosen parts of music that contain repeats. It makes it easier.

Do you listen to a lot of classical music, especially piano? It is good for the ear.

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2812459
02/08/19 06:15 PM
02/08/19 06:15 PM
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Orange County, California
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Thanks, I will have to consider Heumann, and whether it might be useful to get some more variety of pieces for practicing each skill as it's introduced.

I'm not sure if saying I was 'stuck' is quite right, but I'm taking longer to learn each new piece to a level I find satisfactory before moving to learning the next one (though even at that point I'm not done with the piece, as I'll always keep the last few in rotation for a while). Perhaps I should expect this, as the pieces get more complicated, but as the pieces start to include things like jumps, or a difference between the left and right hand in whether a note is played on the beat or off the beat, I find it is taking much longer to become comfortable with playing it.

I have a similar approach to chunking when learning new pieces as you describe, but I don't necessarily work from beginning to end. I also don't know if this is the best, but I've heard about this approach on these forums and elsewhere. Typically for a new piece, I'll spend quite some time before even playing it reading it over, counting through it in my head while taking note of the intervals involved and the fingering, noticing where there is repetition or other patterns. After doing that enough to feel I have a sense of the piece, I'll start with one hand only on a small section I think might be tricky, and then do the other hand. At the very beginning, I'll typically go slowly, one measure at a time, like you've described. Pretty quickly, usually, I'll be able to move to practicing a phrase at a time, with a note or two before and after to help linking up the phrases later (which I've read others on this forum recommend doing). So far, I can get to the point when I can confidently play hands separately pretty quickly, though it takes longer if there are jumps I need to learn. The trouble for me comes when I start playing hands together -- it feels like I'm learning the whole thing from scratch again, except that it takes even longer.

I do listen to a lot of classical music, and have for a long time -- that's actually one of the primary reasons I became interested in learning piano. I agree that it certainly has helped me train my ear in the sense of knowing what I'm listening for when I'm playing, though often that means I'll know when I've done something wrong, but not immediately know how to fix it. That's definitely a first step, though, as then I can take the time to find the answer, and perhaps having to discover it myself and try it a few times to be consistent lets me internalize the solution better than if it were just told ti me (e.g., how to get a consistent p vs. f to cause a contrast in dynamics, or how to get the articulation right to punctuate the end of a phrase).

Thanks again, and I hope you enjoy your own practice going forward smile

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2812522
02/08/19 10:00 PM
02/08/19 10:00 PM
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Coatimundi, You have the right approach in my opinion since I do pretty much the same smile The fact you find it appears to take you a long time on some pieces is not unusual at the beginning, I'd say even in the first year. The main thing is not to get discouraged. - I looked again at James Hook's Minuetto and it is difficult, more than the Gavotte by Handel that follows, and more than the pieces that follows the introduction of sharps and flats. For the same skills, Heuman has in lesson 10: Rameau's Minuet - very easy -, A Presto by Daniel Gotlob Türk - easy - and Charpentier Prelude, from the Te Deum - not so easy and one bar could be challenging. In that lesson there is a counting exercise for dotted quarter note and a theory check, as well as a brief history for each composer. I'm coming to the conclusion that Jimenez lessons are not evenly progressing. I think to benefit fully, I will have to go back to the some of the pieces, like Hook's Minuetto. The second time round was better and a tad easier.

I agree that having to figure out what was wrong and searching how to fix it is the best way to internalize the difficulty and its solution. Then it stays in the memory.

Happy playing.

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2813037
02/10/19 10:37 AM
02/10/19 10:37 AM
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Chiltern Hills, England.
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I'm not sure I agree with Hook's Minuetto being easier than Handel's Gavotte which follows it - I found it the other way around, but I do agree that progression is not entirely even. I like to think that after something particularly challenging Rachel sometimes gives a nice treat afterwards rather than it just being inconsistent :-)

I'm a few pages further in the book currently working on Beethoven's Russian Folk Song and Witthauer's Gavotte which really step it up for moving around the keyboard, but the following Quadrille by Hayden looks much simpler to play although it introduces chords. Like Coatimundi I have tended to spend longer on each piece trying to get it to a reasonably acceptable standard and became a bit concerned that the 'pace' of lessons was going to outrun my learning. I actually bought some supplemental repertoire so that if it became too difficult too quickly I could practice a few more pieces before stepping up to the next one. However that hasn't happened yet, the extra repertoire remains so far unplayed and I am finding that I enjoy the extra challenges each piece brings. I don't know how long this blissful state is going to continue but so far, and somewhat to my surprise, my learning seems to be keeping up with the material :-)

I do have the videos accompanying the series but probably only view one in three of these if I think I'm really struggling with a piece and just want to hear how it actually should sound. I don't have much of a sense of rhythm or ability to hear music in my head when reading it, so it is not until I reach reasonable fluidity playing a piece that I can recognise the rhythm of how it should be played and listening to someone else play it can be a real help at times, hence the videos.

Last edited by gwing; 02/10/19 10:38 AM.
Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2813318
02/10/19 11:31 PM
02/10/19 11:31 PM
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"I'm not sure I agree with Hook's Minuetto being easier than Handel's Gavotte which follows it - I found it the other way around,"

Gwing, I think you misread my line "I looked again at James Hook's Minuetto and it is difficult, more than the Gavotte by Handel that follows, and more than the pieces that follows the introduction of sharps and flats." Maybe my English not up to par. So we are in agreement, the Minuetto is more difficult than the Gavotte and some of the following pieces.

And I also spend more time on every pieces in Rachel's book. I too bought supplemental repertoire (Essential Repertoire) because at first I though there would not enough in Rachel's book. And I have not yet worked on any of those pieces. My time is taken up with Rachel and Heuman's books smile

Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Coatimundi] #2813688
02/11/19 05:52 PM
02/11/19 05:52 PM
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 179
Montuno Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Coatimundi
Hi Montuno,

I noticed this thread a bit late, so not sure if you'll see my reply. I am working through Alfred's AIO, and Fundamental Keys in parallel as a self-learner, as you did at first (I'm also primarily interested in learning to play classical pieces). I started about 5 months ago. I'm curious how far along you were in those methods before you felt a need to change over -- I notice your signature mentions AIO book 2, which I'm nowhere near so far.

I'm also curious how you balanced working through the two methods in parallel. I feel like there's a good balance in different techniques getting focused on between the two, at least early on. It was simpler for me to make progress in them both earlier on though, with simpler music. I find now that I'm at a point where I kind of get stuck on a piece for a week or so at a time, and have to alternate between focusing on learning a piece in one of the methods and then move on to a new piece in the other. That allows me to progress in both, but I perhaps feel like I'm moving along at a slower pace that I would be focusing on one method -- however, this is all stuff I'll need to learn at some point, so I suppose it's not actually slower progress overall. Just curious if you have advice for someone following along with both these methods in the first months, as you've opted to go this route before.


Interesting question. Well, for starters, the 'need to change over' was not borne from how far I was in Alfred. I decided to go for FK as soon as I discovered it on these forums. But I knew right from the start that my interest is more in playing classical music so it was an easy choice.

I recognise your preference for focusing on one method as I tend to practice fewer pieces at the same time than other people. Often I would start a piece from one book once I had the last piece form the other book to a decent level. So my practice was in part early learning of one and getting obsessive about the other (since I recorded everything I just had to get it to a good enough level before I was satisfied). This way the practice had a nice flow.

Learning pieces didn't take very long at first - but somewhere during the blues section (Why am I Blue, Good People) my progress slowed down in both books. I would just keep making errors which was frustrating. As a result I challenged my practice method and investigated new ways to learn a piece. Which keeps things varied and also helps since some pieces lend themselves to different approaches than others.

Whenever I slow down now it means one of 3 things:
- I have to choose another approach to learning the piece
- there is a technical challenge I haven't yet figured out
- I am not doing focused practice

So my best advice when your progress slows down would be: learn to practice, experiment, and find ways to practice for speed as well as accuracy (yes, slow practice has its place, but I found that relying too much on it will only introduce blockades).


Casio Privia PX-150 - Pianoteq
Working on Fundamental Keys / Alfred's Adult All-In-One Book 2

My Music
Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Dreamingstill] #2813701
02/11/19 06:13 PM
02/11/19 06:13 PM
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 179
Montuno Offline OP
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Montuno  Offline OP
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Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 179
Originally Posted by Dreamingstill

I like the finger fitness in the lessons and will buy the book. For my birthday I bought essential repertoire, but pieces are not that easy and although I can more or less get through the baroque pieces I put it aside until I have completed Jimenez and Heuman book one.

I'm interested on how other self-taught using both Heuman and Jimenez work and feel.



Yeah, I share your sentiments on Alfreds, I liked some pieces but at times it got boring.

I can't comment on using Heumann and Jimenez at the same time since I have put FK aside (for now) when I started Heumann (I am on page 83 of FK by the way). For now I stick to the Classical Piano Method, at least until I have finished book 1. How long that takes will probably be determined by how fast I can get through the Finger Fitness book.

It's smart that you take your time for properly learning a piece, in the end this only makes you progress faster.


Casio Privia PX-150 - Pianoteq
Working on Fundamental Keys / Alfred's Adult All-In-One Book 2

My Music
Re: Classical Piano Method by Heumann [Re: Montuno] #2814177
02/12/19 05:46 PM
02/12/19 05:46 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 13
Orange County, California
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Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 13
Orange County, California
Originally Posted by Montuno
So my best advice when your progress slows down would be: learn to practice, experiment, and find ways to practice for speed as well as accuracy (yes, slow practice has its place, but I found that relying too much on it will only introduce blockades).


Thanks for this, and for answering my questions about your experience working through Alfred's and FK in parallel. Varying practice makes a lot of sense, it's becoming clear to me that certain things I do during practice are more or less helpful depending on what it is I'm trying to achieve, and where I'm running into problems. For example I'm currently having trouble with moving my hands around the keyboard (for things like Lone Star Waltz in Alfred's, and the Gavotte by Handel), as that hasn't really been required of me before. I think a lot of this is really that I haven't internalized the geography of the keyboard, and how that relates to my own hand and body positions -- e.g. how it feels to reach for an octave, how it feels to have my hand spread over 5 keys vs. a bit more open to cover a 6th, and so on. I feel like this building this kind of muscle memory into very easy familiarity takes not only a lot of repetition, but also seems like it just naturally takes a while to build up, e.g. I need to sleep on it for a while to see incremental improvement. In any case, I'm happy to still be making some progress, albeit a bit more slowly.


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