Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
What's Hot!!
Mr. PianoWorld - the full interview
-------------------
European Tour for Piano Lovers
JOIN US FOR THE TOUR!
--------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Piano Buyer Guide
Piano Buyer Spring 2018
ad
Pierce Piano Atlas


Who's Online Now
87 registered members (Bett, accordeur, Alex873, ando, beet31425, Beowulf, AaronSF, 16 invisible), 1,441 guests, and 5 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 3 of 4 1 2 3 4
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2779395
11/08/18 08:24 PM
11/08/18 08:24 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 978
In the Ozarks of Missouri
NobleHouse Offline
500 Post Club Member
NobleHouse  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 978
In the Ozarks of Missouri
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
It's obvious from his playing he would never be accepted to a high level conservatory. Without knowing what school accepted him his "getting into a conservatory" doesn't have much meaning IMO.

Well it does say "something" to me. I doubt there are any conservatories, no matter what tier, that often enroll students with only one year of experience. He did say in his Q&A he had some prior flute experience, but that probably can't be counted except from the perspective of being able to read notes on one staff before he started this 12 month self-improvement program. As bSharp(C)yclist said above, someone liked what he did. No doubt the examiner probably knew better than us all the flaws in his audition performance, probably better than most of us, but they probably saw he had energy, enthusiasm, and potential.


This is stated very well. I agree that it says "something" to me as well!!

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779437
11/09/18 02:16 AM
11/09/18 02:16 AM
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,764
Italy
sinophilia Offline

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
sinophilia  Offline

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014


Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,764
Italy
I didn't watch his videos and I don't have any opinion about him, the only thing that comes to my mind is: what for? What do this people think they can achieve? Do they really think they will become concert pianists, world-class musicians? There are literally thousands of people out there who started playing the piano at 2 or 3 years old and were giving concerts with orchestras at 8. There are many more who were already accomplished pianists by his age. If you watch piano competitions, you see hundreds of talented and refined musicians that never get to win a prize. And as we speak there are millions of young people in China and South Korea that are training to become amazing pianists, and many of them succeed. And then the Russians (have you seen Shishkin in Geneva yesterday night?), and the Italians, etc.

What I mean by this is... he may hopefully manage to find some kind of job in music if that's what he really likes to do, but be a concert pianist, or even a great pop or jazz musician? Not a chance. Happens once in a million times. I wouldn't commit precious years to that, when I could have a normal life, go to university, get a good job and just play the piano as a hobby. Call me cynical - I definitely am. I don't believe in anything. Good luck to him, anyway.


Diana & Wally - Yamaha W110BW
To create a beautiful sound, one must imagine it at first and then learn to produce fluid physical motions that breathe life into music. (Shirley Kirsten)
http://soundcloud.com/sinophilia - http://youtube.com/sinophilia
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: sinophilia] #2779445
11/09/18 02:59 AM
11/09/18 02:59 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,207
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,207
Canada
For the first time I'm lost.
Originally Posted by sinophilia
I didn't watch his videos and I don't have any opinion about him, the only thing that comes to my mind is: what for? What do this people think they can achieve? Do they really think they will become concert pianists, world-class musicians? .

If "What for?" were asked by somebody who isn't learning to play an instrument, I'd get it. But if you are practising and learning piano, it doesn't make sense that you are asking why this young man is doing so as well. You might as well ask why any of us here are learning to play. I'm puzzled.

There is a kind of answer as to why he got into this. He liked the music he was hearing, wondered if he could play it, discovered he could, and after a bit he discovered he enjoyed classical music as well. He seems to be enjoying himself. To me that is reason enough.

Or are you asking why he is taking music lessons in that conservatory. Rather than why he is learning to play the piano.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: sinophilia] #2779457
11/09/18 04:18 AM
11/09/18 04:18 AM
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 80
M
Michael P Walsh Offline
Full Member
Michael P Walsh  Offline
Full Member
M

Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 80
Originally Posted by sinophilia
I didn't watch his videos and I don't have any opinion about him, the only thing that comes to my mind is: what for? What do this people think they can achieve? Do they really think they will become concert pianists, world-class musicians? There are literally thousands of people out there who started playing the piano at 2 or 3 years old and were giving concerts with orchestras at 8. There are many more who were already accomplished pianists by his age. If you watch piano competitions, you see hundreds of talented and refined musicians that never get to win a prize. And as we speak there are millions of young people in China and South Korea that are training to become amazing pianists, and many of them succeed. And then the Russians (have you seen Shishkin in Geneva yesterday night?), and the Italians, etc.

What I mean by this is... he may hopefully manage to find some kind of job in music if that's what he really likes to do, but be a concert pianist, or even a great pop or jazz musician? Not a chance. Happens once in a million times. I wouldn't commit precious years to that, when I could have a normal life, go to university, get a good job and just play the piano as a hobby. Call me cynical - I definitely am. I don't believe in anything. Good luck to him, anyway.


The chances of him becoming a true concert pianist (touring) is virtually none. You soon hit the players who have been highly trained since they were 4 or 5 and the number of concert pianists who started before the age of 7 is incredibly high. That's irrelevant. The number of music school grads who do become concert pianists is very small anyway and yet countless thousands enter such establishments every single year. Most may aspire to being the concert superstar. I'm sure there are some who are just happy getting through the course and getting a little teaching job in a provincial town or moving on in life to do something else.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: PianogrlNW] #2779475
11/09/18 05:46 AM
11/09/18 05:46 AM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 350
Toronto, Canada
T
thepianoplayer416 Offline
Full Member
thepianoplayer416  Offline
Full Member
T

Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 350
Toronto, Canada
Originally Posted by PianogrlNW
But here's the thing. There aren't any tricks. Just a lot of hard work.


A number of people in my family circle (including close friends & associates) took music lessons or got their kids to take music lessons. I've been to 2 funeral services where the grandchildren had their trio / quartet in the background to remember grandpa during the service. 2 people were in a Suzuki music program (violin & piano) so they performed in solo recitals and are comfortable playing in small gatherings including special occasions like birthdays & weddings.

And the rest who took music lessons to the point of passing conservatory exams at an advanced level. They no longer play music and don't feel comfortable performing for anybody, even other family members. Without hearing them play live or through recordings, it is hard to judge their playing level. Assuming the ones in the family who passed music exams had at least 5 years of instructions, still doesn't explain why some people get to a level they are comfortable performing in public (in this case through video recordings on social media) and others who had music instructions for years are not at the same level.

Like learning a foreign language. There are people who took French who are not at the level of carrying a basic conversation while others are much more comfortable ordering in restaurants, asking for directions, shopping, etc. You give 2 people the same amount of time, person A is further ahead than B. I am sure both worked very hard but there are other factors in the equation in order to explain why A is getting ahead and B isn't.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779492
11/09/18 08:17 AM
11/09/18 08:17 AM
Joined: Jun 2016
Posts: 485
sara elizabeth Offline
Full Member
sara elizabeth  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jun 2016
Posts: 485
I certainly find this video a little bit suspicious. But regardless, he claims he practises three hours a day. I don’t know if any of you guys practice three hours a day but I certainly don’t. So even if I compare my progress to his, I can’t really say if it’s impossible. I imagine if I started practising three hours a day my progress would skyrocket.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: sara elizabeth] #2779498
11/09/18 08:41 AM
11/09/18 08:41 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
500 Post Club Member
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Originally Posted by sara elizabeth
I certainly find this video a little bit suspicious. But regardless, he claims he practises three hours a day. I don’t know if any of you guys practice three hours a day but I certainly don’t. So even if I compare my progress to his, I can’t really say if it’s impossible. I imagine if I started practising three hours a day my progress would skyrocket.

I've only heard of people practicing 3+ hours of day when they are conservatory-track, at the conservatory or even post-conservatory. There are some present forum members who had posted messages long ago about even practicing 6 hours a day (which leaves me wondering how they had time for school and other non-piano homework!), but then they ended up at the conservatory. There are also some PW forum members who went to the conservatory and have in the past posted about practicing 3+ hours after the conservatory, but I suppose one has that discipline from the conservatory. The rest of us are amateurs and play for fun and fun rarely includes practicing 3 hours a day. That said, this young man now headed for the conservatory, so this probably applies. The surprise is that one would decide to major in music with only one year of experience with one's primary instrument. That's pretty interesting to make a decision like that. If I were his parent, I would try to dissuade my son from an important decision made so quickly (deciding at least part of a career path in just one year).


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2779634
11/09/18 07:02 PM
11/09/18 07:02 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,207
Canada
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
keystring  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 16,207
Canada
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop
Originally Posted by sara elizabeth
I certainly find this video a little bit suspicious. But regardless, he claims he practises three hours a day. I don’t know if any of you guys practice three hours a day but I certainly don’t. So even if I compare my progress to his, I can’t really say if it’s impossible. I imagine if I started practising three hours a day my progress would skyrocket.

I've only heard of people practicing 3+ hours of day when they are conservatory-track, at the conservatory or even post-conservatory.

When I started violin lessons, our teacher said that 3 hours was ideal, so that's what I aimed for. The problem with that is that it must be the right practice, based on something rightly guided. If I ever really return to this, I will have a major chore undoing and changing everything that got "practised in" that now has to get "practised out".

But yes, people do practise that amount of time and there is nothing suspicious about such a statement. In fact, when I get immersed in something and can also find the time, I can easily get absorbed and lose track of how much time I spend. If besides practising you are also thinking about what you're studying while walking or driving to work or school, and count that as "practising" you might add even more time in your calculation.

These days however I rate effective practise over lengthy practise. That can be surprisingly short for rather good overall yields. wink

Last edited by keystring; 11/09/18 07:03 PM.
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779636
11/09/18 07:13 PM
11/09/18 07:13 PM
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 80
M
Michael P Walsh Offline
Full Member
Michael P Walsh  Offline
Full Member
M

Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 80
3 hours is a fair amount. I certainly wouldn't call it excessive although for a rank beginner it no doubt is. I've heard 3 hours (and a lot more) with other instruments like violin and guitar. For serious amateurs who have the time it's not that uncommon.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: Michael P Walsh] #2779638
11/09/18 07:22 PM
11/09/18 07:22 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 24,064
New York City
pianoloverus Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
pianoloverus  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 24,064
New York City
Originally Posted by Michael P Walsh
3 hours is a fair amount. I certainly wouldn't call it excessive although for a rank beginner it no doubt is. I've heard 3 hours (and a lot more) with other instruments like violin and guitar. For serious amateurs who have the time it's not that uncommon.
Although I have no proof I'd guess that maybe 2% of amateurs practice 3 hours/day. Even if one limits it to serious amateurs(depending on one's definition of serious), I think it would be a tiny fraction, maybe 10%.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779642
11/09/18 07:27 PM
11/09/18 07:27 PM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,916
Midwest USA
Stubbie Offline
Gold Subscriber
Stubbie  Offline
Gold Subscriber

Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,916
Midwest USA
I sometimes do three hour practices, but I have the time (I'm retired). However, in those three hours I would be working on four or five different pieces, all in different stages. Working on one piece (or the same sixteen or so bars of one piece for three hours at a time would likely be counterproductive. Working for shorter periods on one piece or section, with a night's sleep in between practices, is far more effective.

Developing good, deep fundamentals takes time--time that includes plenty of practice/sleep cycles. Starting from zero and trying to cram it into a year or two of long practice days leaves me doubtful. Perhaps it can be done (the good fundamentals), but the odds are against you.


[Linked Image]
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: pianoloverus] #2779643
11/09/18 07:28 PM
11/09/18 07:28 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
500 Post Club Member
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by Michael P Walsh
3 hours is a fair amount. I certainly wouldn't call it excessive although for a rank beginner it no doubt is. I've heard 3 hours (and a lot more) with other instruments like violin and guitar. For serious amateurs who have the time it's not that uncommon.
Although I have no proof I'd guess that maybe 2% of amateurs practice 3 hours/day. Even if one limits it to serious amateurs(depending on one's definition of serious), I think it would be a tiny fraction, maybe 10%.

For an amateur who practices 3 hours a day, I would just wonder why they just don't go to the conservatory. For example, I know one guy who spends many many hours of his week flying his very expensive and extensive flight simulator in a virtual airline. At this point, he could go get his private pilots license and fly for real. So why doesn't he? I've asked him and he has said that he wouldn't want to fly a dinky puddle jumper (paraphrasing here). Whatever. (BTW, just a shout out to Sam S as the amateur who is going to the conservatory! Go Sam! smile )


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779649
11/09/18 08:31 PM
11/09/18 08:31 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,763
Georgia, USA
Sam S Offline

2000 Post Club Member
Sam S  Offline

2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,763
Georgia, USA
According to the 2018 version of the Adult Beginner's Forum survey,

28% of us practice less than an hour a day.
56.5 % practice 1-2 hours a day
14.5% practice 2-3 hours a day
2.3% practice 3-4 hours a day
0.8% practice more than 4 hours a day.

Reported like that, it certainly sounds scientific doesn't it? But it wasn't really - 132 people responded to the survey. We do like to practice though.

As an undergraduate piano performance major at a regional state university (not a conservatory!), for the first 3 years, I'm supposed to do a minimum of 12 hours a week. For the senior year, 18 hours a week minimum. But the minimum doesn't get much done for me - I'm doing about 15 hours a week as a Junior to keep my head above water.

I have seen Freshman get in to the program without a lot of experience. Yes, there is an audition, but the teachers here are willing to work with the prospective students before they audition so they have a good chance. I've seen some of those students drop out, and others have done well. A lot depends on the major - I've seen kids start out in Piano Performance and then change to Music Education, which doesn't have the same performance requirements.

Sam

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779655
11/09/18 09:17 PM
11/09/18 09:17 PM
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 246
Chicago
J
John305 Online content
Full Member
John305  Online Content
Full Member
J

Joined: May 2018
Posts: 246
Chicago
Hey Sam S, how about an update on your thread about your academic adventures. It seems like it's been a while since I've seen you post about your studies and I was wondering how things are going. Your post above just reminded me to ask you for an update. It's probably my favorite thread on PW.

Sorry for high jacking this thread.


It’s never too late to be what you might have been. -George Eliot
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: keystring] #2779659
11/09/18 10:09 PM
11/09/18 10:09 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 21,668
Victoria, BC
BruceD Offline
Gold Subscriber
BruceD  Offline
Gold Subscriber

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 21,668
Victoria, BC
Originally Posted by keystring
[...] In fact, when I get immersed in something and can also find the time, I can easily get absorbed and lose track of how much time I spend. [...]


Example: My time on PianoWorld! smile


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: pianoloverus] #2779668
11/09/18 10:48 PM
11/09/18 10:48 PM
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,967
W
Whizbang Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Whizbang  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W

Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,967
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Even if one limits it to serious amateurs(depending on one's definition of serious), I think it would be a tiny fraction, maybe 10%.


I resemble that remark.


Whizbang [Linked Image]
amateur ragtime pianist
https://www.youtube.com/user/Aeschala
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: John305] #2779669
11/09/18 10:50 PM
11/09/18 10:50 PM
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,967
W
Whizbang Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Whizbang  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W

Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,967
Originally Posted by John305
It's probably my favorite thread on PW.


Yah, How many of those upstart twenty-somethings have their own built-in cheering section?


Whizbang [Linked Image]
amateur ragtime pianist
https://www.youtube.com/user/Aeschala
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779672
11/09/18 11:33 PM
11/09/18 11:33 PM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 350
Toronto, Canada
T
thepianoplayer416 Offline
Full Member
thepianoplayer416  Offline
Full Member
T

Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 350
Toronto, Canada
I don't think many people can even consistently put in 3h/day practice. People like myself are non professionals and have jobs, family responsibilities. Just coming home from work each day is already very tiring. Unless you are still in university and decided to take a year off, putting in the kind of energy & focus is hard. Even in high school I had 1 music class a day but the workload for other subjects was heavy and only allowed me to practice 1h/day at most.

The average folks who take music lessons tend to work at the speed expected by their teachers. At the end of the first year, you are expected to get to the Minuet in G & Gm from the Notebook for Anna M Bach and most students would get there in a year, maybe later but not earlier. The ones who reach a certain point in a short time are considered prodigies. Some people have a keen interest in music and would play their instrument a few hours a day. Others who may be intelligent and capable would progress at a more leisurely pace. And they would rarely attempt to learn pieces that are outside their assigned repertoire.

The case I read about 3 years ago where hard work to the extreme paid off involves a young lady (Sophie) who was pushed by her Tiger Mom (Amy Chua) the Chinese-American author to complete the entire Suzuki piano curriculum in a year. And Sophie was pushed to the point of practicing everyday until every piece was note perfect before the family had dinner. 1 wrong note was like Sophie was holding everybody up. And on vacation, Ms. Chua made sure every hotel had a piano so that her daughter could practice every day of the week without a day off. And Sophie became the youngest to perform in a solo recital at Carnegie Hall in NYC as described in Ms. Chua's book "Battle Hymns of the Tiger Mother".

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: thepianoplayer416] #2779696
11/10/18 03:43 AM
11/10/18 03:43 AM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 493
South Wales
C
Colin Miles Offline
Full Member
Colin Miles  Offline
Full Member
C

Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 493
South Wales
Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
I don't think many people can even consistently put in 3h/day practice. .

I am retired and although I have quite a few other commitments I could, in theory, easily put in 3 hours every day. But I seldom manage that. I aim for 2 to 2.5 hrs of intensive practice in short sessions of between 10 and 30 mins - usually 15 to 20 - and it is usually the first hour that is most productive.

It is the quality of the practice that is most important not the overall length, though you won't progress much if you do much less than an hour a day.


Roland LX7

South Wales, UK
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: thepianoplayer416] #2779739
11/10/18 08:18 AM
11/10/18 08:18 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
500 Post Club Member
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Originally Posted by thepianoplayer416
The case I read about 3 years ago where hard work to the extreme paid off involves a young lady (Sophie) who was pushed by her Tiger Mom (Amy Chua) the Chinese-American author to complete the entire Suzuki piano curriculum in a year. And Sophie was pushed to the point of practicing everyday until every piece was note perfect before the family had dinner. 1 wrong note was like Sophie was holding everybody up. And on vacation, Ms. Chua made sure every hotel had a piano so that her daughter could practice every day of the week without a day off. And Sophie became the youngest to perform in a solo recital at Carnegie Hall in NYC as described in Ms. Chua's book "Battle Hymns of the Tiger Mother".

OT, but I personally feel that Ms. Chua as a person of Asian heritage (though I doubt she's done more than step foot in the countries of her parent's birth), has done the most trouble for the Asian community in the US, by bringing into sharp focus for Americans and people in the West, a particularly unattractive feature of a segment of the Chinese-American community. I took particular perverse pleasure in reading about some troubles she's had recently with her employer. I judge all of this as a person who did come from the country of her claimed ethnicity, whereas it wasn't even clear her parents were more than just "born" on that country (China).

That said, for piano playing, in the end, this sort of thing may be all for the best. As some threads have indicated on PW, if asians (both in West and in Asia itself) were not buying pianos and (tiggrishly forcing their kids) play them, then perhaps the piano playing and teaching industry would be in even worse shape than it is today.


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: Sam S] #2779827
11/10/18 01:59 PM
11/10/18 01:59 PM
Joined: Jun 2016
Posts: 485
sara elizabeth Offline
Full Member
sara elizabeth  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Jun 2016
Posts: 485
Originally Posted by Sam S
According to the 2018 version of the Adult Beginner's Forum survey,

28% of us practice less than an hour a day.
56.5 % practice 1-2 hours a day
14.5% practice 2-3 hours a day
2.3% practice 3-4 hours a day
0.8% practice more than 4 hours a day.

Reported like that, it certainly sounds scientific doesn't it? But it wasn't really - 132 people responded to the survey. We do like to practice though.

Sam


I’m impressed with how much people are practicing. If I had to guess, I would have guessed lower. However I’m not sure the people on ABF are the typical adult beginner. I feel like we are all a just a little bit more serious .

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779954
11/10/18 10:21 PM
11/10/18 10:21 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 300
Virginia
D
DFSRN Offline
Full Member
DFSRN  Offline
Full Member
D

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 300
Virginia
Quote
For an amateur who practices 3 hours a day, I would just wonder why they just don't go to the conservatory.


I play from 2-3 hours a day, generally split my time. I know people that watch TV 3 hours a day or play video games and no one thinks anything about it. I have no desire to pursue formal education. I do take lessons 4 hours a week, 2 hours piano the other 2 hours theory/rhythm training on 2 different days. However, this is a hobby, I do not worry about GPA or missing a class, doing homework. I am in my 5th year of lessons, I am just having fun. I lose track of time when I practice.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2779957
11/10/18 10:58 PM
11/10/18 10:58 PM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 350
Toronto, Canada
T
thepianoplayer416 Offline
Full Member
thepianoplayer416  Offline
Full Member
T

Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 350
Toronto, Canada
When it comes to time management, I do agree between playing piano and other hobbies depends on a person's priorities. There is 1 person who is retired. She may have taken some piano lessons but did not get into music in a serious way. During the day she preferred to be at home glued to certain TV programs she thinks are educational. Another young man at a high school level had some personal issues and took time off. He took music lessons for a few years but does not show any interest in music or feel comfortable playing and learning new songs on his own. With all the free time he would play video games for hours. On the other hand, his parents made music into an academic exercise that when he is near a piano would bring back bad memories.

Some young people who got enrolled into a music program by their parents ended up hating piano or violin that they wouldn't touch it for the rest of their lives. I'm the exact opposite. Coming from a non-musical family, nobody in the immediate family perform anywhere or practice regularly. Everybody in the family discuss money all the time. I find that playing music is a stress relieve from the rest of the family who seems to be obsessed with money. Living in a building with neighbors around I can only have a keyboard with a volume control. Today I spent the afternoon at a community center playing on 1 of their acoustic pianos. Nobody in the family who took music lessons in the past touched a piano within the past 5 years.

Having an interest in music is a personal thing. Not everybody who had lessons would continue playing many years afterwards. Some people feel that they need a teacher to be around to learn a few songs because they are afraid they may do something wrong. Even after passing a few conservatory exams, some feel they need a teacher to guide them along the way. Like playing piano is something you can never be good enough to do it on your own.

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: DFSRN] #2780083
11/11/18 12:04 PM
11/11/18 12:04 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 978
In the Ozarks of Missouri
NobleHouse Offline
500 Post Club Member
NobleHouse  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 978
In the Ozarks of Missouri
Originally Posted by DFSRN
Quote
For an amateur who practices 3 hours a day, I would just wonder why they just don't go to the conservatory.


I play from 2-3 hours a day, generally split my time. I know people that watch TV 3 hours a day or play video games and no one thinks anything about it. I have no desire to pursue formal education. I do take lessons 4 hours a week, 2 hours piano the other 2 hours theory/rhythm training on 2 different days. However, this is a hobby, I do not worry about GPA or missing a class, doing homework. I am in my 5th year of lessons, I am just having fun. I lose track of time when I practice.


People like YOU are a true inspiration to people like me. Thanks!

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: ZanderChicago] #2780142
11/11/18 03:42 PM
11/11/18 03:42 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 300
Virginia
D
DFSRN Offline
Full Member
DFSRN  Offline
Full Member
D

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 300
Virginia
Thanks NobleHouse, I am not implying education is not important, I have a PhD and I am done with that part of my life at 58. However, my rhythm/theory teacher has created test unannounced, I have passed them all, if 80 is passing. When I went to college I thought music majors really were there to have fun. Taking music lessons as an adult I now have a different perspective of what it takes to be a performing musician. People have to go into this profession for the love it.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: DFSRN] #2780151
11/11/18 04:08 PM
11/11/18 04:08 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
500 Post Club Member
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Originally Posted by DFSRN
However, my rhythm/theory teacher has created test unannounced, I have passed them all, if 80 is passing.

Just curious- why do you pay a rhythm/theory teacher to teach you music theory? At 2 hours per week, wouldn't a music theory course at your local university be cheaper? Or if it is a matter of convenience, something like this?


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2780231
11/11/18 09:08 PM
11/11/18 09:08 PM
Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 300
Virginia
D
DFSRN Offline
Full Member
DFSRN  Offline
Full Member
D

Joined: Jul 2017
Posts: 300
Virginia
Tyrone, I am a life time learner, however after two masters and a PhD, I am done with the formal schooling and the stress that goes along with it. He creates these test I believe to assess what I may need additional work on. If I did not do well, there is no consequence. If my husband and I decide to go on vacation, I just take the week off (I do still pay for my class). I finished by doctorate in July 2014, and have been taking 4 hours a week 2 for piano and 2 for rhythm/theory. It is nice to have classes customized for my specific learning needs. The director of the non-profit school has not raised my rates of $60 per hour since I started. For the past 2 summers we focused on jazz theory, so for the past 2 years I have been playing some songs out of a fake book. I am also working on 2 pianos 4 hands songs and playing while he accompanies me on the drums (he is a drum teacher also) to get a better sense of the pulse. Keeping time is my weakness and when you play along with someone, it becomes apparent if you missed the beat. This type of education would be difficult to get in a classroom setting. I have regretted not keeping up my music from childhood, I quit playing the violin at 18. I am at the point in life, I don't want to have regrets. I would like to be good enough to volunteer for the church and community functions.


Deb
"A goal properly set is halfway reached." Zig Ziglar
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: DFSRN] #2780242
11/11/18 09:52 PM
11/11/18 09:52 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
500 Post Club Member
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Originally Posted by DFSRN
Tyrone, I am a life time learner, however after two masters and a PhD, I am done with the formal schooling and the stress that goes along with it. He creates these test I believe to assess what I may need additional work on. If I did not do well, there is no consequence. If my husband and I decide to go on vacation, I just take the week off (I do still pay for my class). I finished by doctorate in July 2014, and have been taking 4 hours a week 2 for piano and 2 for rhythm/theory. It is nice to have classes customized for my specific learning needs. The director of the non-profit school has not raised my rates of $60 per hour since I started. For the past 2 summers we focused on jazz theory, so for the past 2 years I have been playing some songs out of a fake book. I am also working on 2 pianos 4 hands songs and playing while he accompanies me on the drums (he is a drum teacher also) to get a better sense of the pulse. Keeping time is my weakness and when you play along with someone, it becomes apparent if you missed the beat. This type of education would be difficult to get in a classroom setting. I have regretted not keeping up my music from childhood, I quit playing the violin at 18. I am at the point in life, I don't want to have regrets. I would like to be good enough to volunteer for the church and community functions.

I was just a little surprised because you're paying about $6K per year for your theory classes, for which you could take quite a bit of theory classes at the Uni or online for example at Berklee, but now I completely understand. Thanks for the explanation. We are all willing to pay for convenience and do it routinely, some more than others. And it also sounds like it's not only the convenience of being able to miss classes guilt-free, but that formal classes stress you, and so you are paying for stress-free and tailored learning too. (Are you like me, in that only an "A" will do? LOL.)

BTW, for additional stress-free, but in this case, non-tailored learning, have you every looked into non-graded/evaluated learning opportunities, such as Coursera?


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: Tyrone Slothrop] #2780247
11/11/18 10:18 PM
11/11/18 10:18 PM
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 459
Dublin
J
johnstaf Online crying
Full Member
johnstaf  Online Crying
Full Member
J

Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 459
Dublin
Originally Posted by Tyrone Slothrop

I was just a little surprised because you're paying about $6K per year for your theory classes, for which you could take quite a bit of theory classes at the Uni or online for example at Berklee, but now I completely understand.


This probably differs by country, but where I live you can't take university classes unless at degree level. Is it different in the U.S. for example?

Re: I don't believe this is true [Re: johnstaf] #2780253
11/11/18 10:58 PM
11/11/18 10:58 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Tyrone Slothrop Online content
500 Post Club Member
Tyrone Slothrop  Online Content
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 730
Originally Posted by johnstaf
This probably differs by country, but where I live you can't take university classes unless at degree level. Is it different in the U.S. for example?

This was considered elitist and most educational institutions in the US have moved away from this model. It's elitist because it limits the educational opportunities to only those who can afford to go to college for a degree (afford either from a cost or time perspective). Even my alma mater now offers classes to students not in a degree program. They sometimes refer to this as the "evening division" or "adult learning programs" or some such. What's more, you can even take courses online in the US (including for college credit) even from a foreign country.


across the stone, deathless piano performances
Page 3 of 4 1 2 3 4

Moderated by  BB Player 

(ad)
Sweetwater - Keyboards
Sweetwater
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Curriculum of techniques for various levels?
by cathryn999. 11/17/18 10:25 PM
Ever heard of Yamaha SCLP-5450??
by Sean L. 11/17/18 09:39 PM
Disobedient pinkies & lazy thumbs
by Tyrone Slothrop. 11/17/18 08:06 PM
Modulation
by Alex873. 11/17/18 07:26 PM
Problem with sound on Yamaha DGX-630?
by Sophiex. 11/17/18 06:34 PM
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Petrof
Forum Statistics
Forums40
Topics188,391
Posts2,762,079
Members91,513
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Please Support Our Advertisers
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

Sweetwater

PianoTeq Petrof
Piano Buyer Spring 2018
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2018 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.2