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Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765260
09/13/18 02:01 PM
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Here is my partial answer to the question what is the hierarchy of dissonance of four triads and their inversions?
Among the inversions of the major and minor triads in the middle register is the most dissonant - the first inversion, the least dissonant - the second inversion. The abundance of the first triad inversion in Elton John harmony indicates a preference for softer dissonances than say the major 7.

Last edited by Nahum; 09/13/18 02:06 PM.
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Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765266
09/13/18 02:43 PM
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"Acoustics" provides the initial role of inspiration for music, but actually understanding music requires understanding how we've abstracted those qualities and incorporated them into the human imagination. Thinking too "concretely" about the role of acoustics in music leads to all sorts of problems. I'm going to be quoting from various posts of the same writer who I believe has succinctly cut through a lot of the underlying issues in play here. All bold my emphasis.

This first quote exemplifies my point about this "too concrete" thinking without context:

Quote
The most important point I would make is that what you describe under 2.) is the way Schenkerian analysis is always supposed to work (for any piece); the idea of mechanically "reducing" according to locally-determined values of consonance and dissonance is extremely un-Schenkerian. An apparent dissonance might turn out to be "really" a consonance; and vice-versa.

(A favorite go-to example: "the tonic chord in root position" from Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 that is dissonant.)

This is of course why Straus misses the point; his argument might apply to Lerdahl and Jackendoff, but certainly not to Schenker. Yet most Schenkerians (at least) would regard Lerdahl and Jackendoff as a pretty bad theory even of "tonal" music.

At the most basic level, the conceptual problem with such approaches (including, as far as I can tell, that of the OP, /u/Kalcipher) is that they are too concrete: they assume an extremely impoverished notion of context, one that misses all kinds of essential metadata. This includes, for instance, the kind of information that allows one to recognize that the situation in the Beethoven example above is "like" situations where a 6 and 4 resolve to a 5 and 3.


The overtone series as the source of meaning for consonance does play a role, but it leads to all sorts of conceptual problems when you take it too seriously. It's especially pernicious because of the particular way if causes confusion with how it interacts with "chord theory".

For example, there's a certain train of thought concerning the "emancipation of dissonance" found in both Schoenberg and Nadia Boulanger trying to ascribe the freer use of these notes to the overtone series. Which leads to an unspoken understanding that has caused loads of confusion.

Quote
Certain simultaneities occurring in music are “chords”, and others aren’t. Those that aren’t are the result of combining tones of a “chord” with other, so-called “non-harmonic”, tones, which must fall into one of a number of particular types specifying how they relate to the tones of nearby “chords”. If a certain such “non-harmonic” formation gets used sufficiently often by sufficiently prestigious composers, it may be declared a “chord”, and thereafter liberated from the restrictions governing non-harmonic tones, subject only to the rules governing the interactions of “chords” themselves – which rules it is the task of the theorist to formulate. We agree not to notice the fact that the rules for non-harmonic tones actually permit any simultaneity to arise, and thus through usage, to attain the status of a “chord”, because we prefer not to acknowledge that it is usage that determines :chord” status, and instead to maintain a fiction that “chord” status is inherently justified by supposed relationships to the overtone series.

Well, Schoenberg noticed. And, he argued that the overtone series, too, could potentially be seen to justify essentially any chord, by reference to the higher partials, whose relationships to the fundamental are more complex and suggestive of the dissonant intervals that characterize many of the simultaneities of the “modern” music of the time.

https://komponisto.tumblr.com/post/160087428485/early-webern-the-futility-of-chord-theory-and


One can certain argue this emanicpation, but it comes not from an appeal to the overtone series but actual musical context.

Quote
As is well known, Schoenberg – whose teaching synthesized the old and the new by essentially conveying a modern composer’s understanding of musical history, for like Schenker he was an artist rather than a scholar – advocated an idea he called the “emancipation of the dissonance”. This idea, which can indeed be viewed as perhaps the central generating force of the history of serious, ambitious music (and not just of the 20th century, though yes, in particular, of that period), has nevertheless been entirely misunderstood by virtually everyone, with the important and ironic exception of Schoenberg’s fierce critic, Schenker.

Properly stated, the idea in its essence is this: Because all dissonance has its conceptual origin in consonance, there is no theoretical restriction on the dissonance that may be employed in free composition, provided its relationship to some underlying consonance is comprehensible.

The history of musical progress, thus (in the so-called “harmonic” domain) is one of increasingly complex and distant relationships to consonance becoming “comprehensible”. This might be compared to the phenomenon of elliptical usage in language, the process whereby “I wish you a good morning!” becomes “Good morning!”, which, in turn, becomes “Morning!” – a process which is meaningfully similar to the musical process whereby

[Linked Image]

becomes

[Linked Image]

which becomes

[Linked Image]




To make this more relevant to this forum see how this line of thought is essentially the same to justify Jazz use of 'dissonance':
https://www.scribd.com/document/199...f-Modern-Jazz-Questions-about-Method-pdf

But what role the overtone series actually play?:

Quote
Observations are always theory-laden; but in the case of music, the theories in circulation are so bad that this staple slogan of postmodernism really comes into its own. From where I sit the idea of "interval-based dissonance studies", or "ranking triads by dissonance" etc. doesn't even make sense as a concept. It's almost gibberish. You can measure acoustical properties, and you can try to find out what kind of context listeners automatically attribute to an out-of-context sound; these are questions that at least make sense (without regard to how interesting they might be). But asking listeners to produce "dissonance rankings" doesn't; it amounts to asking them to do (a kind of) music theory on the spot, subject to weirdly circumscribed, artificial, and musically irrelevant restrictions.

What it -- posing such a question at all -- in fact looks like is a failure to absorb the music-theoretical insight that the actual properties -- the ultimately meaningful concepts -- that people were historically pointing to with the terms "consonance" and "dissonance" turn out to be matters of diatonic structure. Pythagoras in the blacksmith shop may have thought that "consonances" were the "good" sounds and "dissonances" the "bad" ones, but a few millennia later we now realize (at least, those of us who do realize it) that what he was actually getting at -- though of course he didn't realize it -- was that consonance is the stability property of non-step-related tones in a diatonic collection; and dissonance, the corresponding instability resulting from step relations and chromatic tones. The diatonic collection itself, of course, comes from the harmonic series (this being Pythagoras' contribution to the subject, and is almost the entire extent of the relevance of physical acoustics to music theory).

I simply don't think that anyone who has truly integrated the insight of the preceding paragraph into their consciousness would have any interest in asking some random experimental subject whether they think a minor third is "more dissonant" than a major third, or an augmented triad "more dissonant" than a diminished triad. The question of consonance and dissonance is a theoretical one that has been settled theoretically. Of course one expects listeners to perceive an augmented triad differently from a diminished triad, by virtue of the fact that the diminished triad fits into a single diatonic collection, and the augmented triad doesn't. There's no mystery about this.

Much more interesting than the reactions of experimental subjects (constrained to use the vocabulary of "dissonance", as if they were themselves music theorists investigating a question that hadn't been settled) to out-of-context stimuli, is the implication of the above that the diminished triad is actually a consonance. Thus, we are led to recognize the autonomy of the VII harmonic step and the Locrian mode. It is, to be sure, a special case, because there is only a single diminished triad within any diatonic collection (and thus only one mode with a diminished triad as tonic); if we need to explain a difference in "experimental perception" of the diminished triad relative to the major and minor, the explanation is here at hand. But it is of yet more relevance as an explanation of the artistically normative implication that we should perceive it differently, in accordance with its nature.

We are also led, by the realization above regarding the nature of consonance and dissonance, to distinguishing between dissonance that arises from step relationships and that which arises merely from chromaticism; the latter we may call pseudo-consonance. It is into this category that the augmented triad falls.

https://www.reddit.com/r/musictheor...onsonance_definitions/drqjcyi/?context=3


Quote
But, if the arguments purporting to found chordal practice (and thus theory) on the overtone series (and even, in Riemann’s case, on a hypothesized symmetrical “undertone series”) strike us as quaint bordering on ridiculous now, it is – or at least should be – only to the extent that our theoretical sophistication has increased enough to know that (at least until the advent of spectralism, etc.) the overtone series serves as a source of the pitch materials of Western art music only through its role in the generation of the diatonic scale. It is from the latter that we may then derive all other theoretical notions in the realm of pitch, such as consonance, dissonance, and the triad (all of which arise ultimately from the distinction between steps and skips, an essential, perhaps the essential, psychological feature of diatonic space).

Most of the reasoning leading to these conclusions can be found in Schenker, for all that he continues to view the major triad as being grounded directly in “Nature” (i.e. the overtone series); in particular, he writes that “No overtone beyond the fifth in the series has any application to our tonal system”, the heading of §11 of Harmony.https://komponisto.tumblr.com/post/160087428485/early-webern-the-futility-of-chord-theory-and


]Anyone interested on how the diatonic collection (and the twelve divisions of the octave) can be rationally reconstructed from the abstract notions of "skip" and "step" should see the Appendix to Westergaard's Introduction Tonal Theory. Strictly speaking, only the notions of "unison", "octave", and "fifth" are really truly needed as a primary source of intervals to construct the diatonic system and all other intervals.

Even the major third plays a more subordinate role. I'd probably argue that the major third plays from the overtone series in how it helps "break the tie" between Ionian/Major and Aeolian/Minor for the choice of conceptual priority. (Which is reflected in the conventional assignment of unaltered scale degrees 1234567, the notion of a Picard Third, and the alterations made to Aeolian via the melodic/harmonic minor scale constructs which are essentially "borrowings" from Major into pure Minor).]

The tumblr essay I linked, is long but really worth reading and considering. I'll conclude here by re-quoting one of the often-quoted statements by Schenker and his followers (I can already think of at least three instances):

THE DISSONANT INTERVAL IS ALWAYS A PASSING EVENT, NEVER A COMPOSITE SOUND.

The notion of "step" or "adjacency with trajectory" or "dissonance" always has a sense where it occurs and passes through an underlying consonant "stable non-adjacent" space whether this be more literal or more imaginary/spiritual/abstract. There's always a sense where you always hear these dissonances move and function "inside" of something larger even if only implicitly (hearing a note's resolution tendencies doesn't mean it actually does so).





Last edited by anamnesis; 09/13/18 02:49 PM.
Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765267
09/13/18 02:48 PM
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Acoustic explanation: the smaller is the interval which located at the bottom of the voicing , the more dissonant is its sound - in strict accordance with the system of overtones.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765273
09/13/18 03:22 PM
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Anamnesis, thanks for the materials.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765370
09/14/18 01:23 AM
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As I understand it, a wide range of fundamental objections to the initiated study of overtones system in the course of harmony is based on the views of musical theorists of the past who had no connections with observations and analyzes in the field of jazz and non-European musical cultures at all . Suffice it to mention the most important Soviet musicologist Leo Mazel, who explained the phenomenon of gravity dominant in the tonic by introductory pitches of tritone , completely denying the acoustic mechanism of overtones. However, he knew nothing about setting up and using African drums (as he wrote specifically), where the main pitch is final, despite the fact that there is no tritone in pentatonic scales.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDdN8GQQ3A8

We don't hear overtones?

About drone on tampour in Indian music already mentioned?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZ8BJfU-7t8

We don't hear overtones?

And when the didgeridoo sounds, we don't hear overtones?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5tgXbFAZwY

We do not hear the overtones in the human voice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vC9Qh709gas

I take my Tibetan cup and gently hit it; I am enveloped in a fairytale sound. If the blow is sharper, there is a sound of an octave + fifth higher.
No overtones here?

I easily clap my hands, then sharply - sometimes the sharp sound is higher by an octave, sometimes by a fifth.
Not overtone?

Who dares to say that the overtones are not at every step? Minor triad is not at every step, and the overtones - yes. So where does the study of harmony begin?

===========================================
On my desk in college, during the lessons of harmony and arrangement, there is always a large schema with this scheme, so that the students never forget it:

[Linked Image]


And in the end, only the facts decide whether this is the right approach or not:

https://yadi.sk/d/44_r3Dd23YakLz


https://soundcloud.com/you/tracks









Last edited by Nahum; 09/14/18 01:26 AM.
Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765371
09/14/18 01:37 AM
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Overtones are sources of chords, not vice versa!

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765387
09/14/18 04:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Nahum

We don't hear overtones?




Nobody would deny that all (non-electronic) sounds are built up of overtones/harmonics/partials, that is a physical fact of resonating systems, but to try to use that as a justification of complex harmony is another thing entirely imo.
Humans have been playing music for thousands maybe tens of thousands of years and yet the dominant tonic harmonic relationship has been around for what 500 or so. Already dominant chords are all but abolished in pop music and classical music has moved on well beyond functional harmony ages ago. Given this it seems strange to me to say that there is a physical reason for this harmonic relationship to be essential.
When we look around the world at all the different types of music there are are there any other that have a dominant chord that resolves to a tonic? I think there is not. The 1st and 5th drone is more common but I don’t see that we can really extend this to explaining the whole harmonic system of western music and jazz.

To me classical harmony of the 18/19th century, or modal jazz harmony, is much more like a movement in painting, say expressionism for example.
It is an expression of the times which changes relatively rapidly. To me this kind of cultural explanation just seems to fit the facts we observe much better.

Ultimately though I couldn’t care less about any of this, I am only really interested in the utility of an idea. If ranking dissonance levels of triads and inversions helps somebody create something then that is great, I just can’t see the use for me.


Originally Posted by Nahum


And in the end, only the facts decide whether this is the right approach or not:

https://yadi.sk/d/44_r3Dd23YakLz



If that is one of your students you are obviously doing a splendid job of teaching harmony - some very beautiful and advanced harmony going on there, I love it. But there is more than one way to skin a cat!

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: beeboss] #2765398
09/14/18 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by beeboss
When we look around the world at all the different types of music there are are there any other that have a dominant chord that resolves to a tonic? I think there is not. The 1st and 5th drone is more common but I don’t see that we can really extend this to explaining the whole harmonic system of western music and jazz. ]

Here I just disagree! Because each blow on drum causes a sound composed of the main tone and its overtones-octave and fifth , which the skilled player can select using different techniques of touch . But the ending will always be on the main pitch. In a low pitch of piano, a person with a very developed overtone hearing (possibly a color ) can hear a chord X7; a musician with an ordinary developed musical ear necessarily feels in a low drone the major triad - checked dozens of times in groups at the first lesson of harmony course y. Try it, and make sure!
Overtons are sources of stable tonic and unstable fifth stage. Equal to the dominant in all musical cultures, be it Indian swaras , or Arab maqams .

My goal: do not load the student with the rules, but open up the horizons of opportunities and alternatives for them. And you heard the result.

Last edited by Nahum; 09/14/18 06:33 AM.
Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765402
09/14/18 07:05 AM
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So this is decidedly not restricted to prout's 'why' but a more general 'how'. I admit that's piqued my interest. Where and in what manner do the benefits accrue. The student sees this table of overtones….but then what is the process? What next?

Originally Posted by Nahum
Here I just disagree! Because each blow on drum causes a sound composed of the main tone and its overtones-octave and fifth , which the skilled player can select using different techniques of touch . But the ending will always be on the main pitch. In a low pitch of piano, a person with a very developed overtone hearing (possibly a color ) can hear a chord X7; a musician with an ordinary developed musical ear necessarily feels in a low drone the major triad - checked dozens of times in groups at the first lesson of harmony course y. Try it, and make sure!
Overtons are sources of stable tonic and unstable fifth stage. Equal to the dominant in all musical cultures, be it Indian swaras , or Arab maqams.

Will this be music for the performer's pleasure or the listener's?
Any chance of a practical demonstration? I'm hard put to see how you capitalize on the low drone major triad in such a way as to sustain interest.

Quote

My goal: do not load the student with the rules, but open up the horizons of opportunities and alternatives for them. And you heard the result.

That's pretty close to begging the question.

As is well known, each of us springs off a different starting line. Your student may already have been a gifted and able player who has inevitably improved during his time with you whether under his own steam or your pressure. On the other hand, if he transitioned from nursery rhymes to this more advanced level after an intensive course of overtoneing, I'd be interested in learning more - preferably from the student himself. Could he be invited to tell us something about his development during the overtone study phase?

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: dire tonic] #2765418
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Originally Posted by Nahum
In a low pitch of piano, a person with a very developed overtone hearing (possibly a color ) can hear a chord X7; a musician with an ordinary developed musical ear necessarily feels in a low drone the major triad - checked dozens of times in groups at the first lesson of harmony course y. Try it, and make sure!
Overtons are sources of stable tonic and unstable fifth stage. Equal to the dominant in all musical cultures, be it Indian swaras , or Arab maqams.

Will this be music for the performer's pleasure or the listener's?
Any chance of a practical demonstration? I'm hard put to see how you capitalize on the low drone major triad in such a way as to sustain interest.


..unfortunately my skimming your post led to the wrong response and the edit window is too short.

Yes, the harmonics are audible up to X7, usually they unfold as the fundamental frequency fades over time although this does depend on the quality of the piano and the pitch of the note. However the instantaneous strike is highly biased to the perceived fundamental. Why are you preoccupied with the overtones here?

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765467
09/14/18 11:31 AM
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Skip the music for a moment and look at the process by which sound is created.

A natural trumpet, for example, still used today in major HIP orchestras, has no valves, yet performs music based on the overtone series. The higher the pitch, the closer together the pitches.

A bugle has no valvles, yet has been used for millenia by blowing the overtone series.

Bagpipes and their relatives, in use for several millennia, use drones of the fundamental and fifth, as does the hurdy-gurdy.

Winds, blowing through holes in seaside caves, produce the full harmonic series and have been heard by humans for several million years.

We humans also produce, within our ears, non-linear distortiion, which allows us to hear resultant pitches that do not exist. That is to say, you can hear it, but a microphone cannot hear it. This is easily heard on a piano by playing two notes, say C5 and E5. A third pitch G4, can be heard, even though it cannot be recorded. Play C5 and F5. F3 can be heard. Our ear/brain psychoacoustic process is overtone based, according to the latest theories.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: dire tonic] #2765486
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Originally Posted by dire tonic
So this is decidedly not restricted to prout's 'why' but a more general 'how'. I admit that's piqued my interest. Where and in what manner do the benefits accrue. The student sees this table of overtones….but then what is the process? What next?

Yes, the necessary question: why do we need to study something that looks absolutely unnecessary ballast for the main purpose - to learn the chords and harmonic patterns necessary for the chosen genre (during 13 years of my studies at a children's music school, college and academy, I studied classical harmony three times anew , and 0 times (!) overtones) ? From my point of view, the most ideal situation is when I teach the first year of the course of harmony - parallel to individual piano lessons, which establishes a close connection between theory lessons , and its practical use. In individual lessons, in working on the harmonization of melody or the arrangement of the piano texture, that the student should watch (and hear !!!) on executable by him music through their prism. There are cases when I sit with the pupil during the lesson, polishing each chord, when I present him with several alternatives (not too much); and most importantly: I explain what effect produce these or other voicing for a given tune . This is very different from Mark Levine, also the result. In addition, it makes students again to listen and to think about ! Anyway ; despite the fact that there were around teachers who had graduated from New School or Berklee; where I have never been, at examinations my students favorably differed from others.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: dire tonic] #2765666
09/15/18 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by dire tonic
Why are you preoccupied with the overtones here?
I haven't seen reactions to the post # 2765125 09/13/18 08:14 AM , which contains some answers to this question. If pupil brings to lesson the Blue Bossa and plays in l.h. the right seventh chords , but in the counter octave, I can tell him simply: "It sounds bad, play 2 octaves higher" . This is a directive; and by this principle are built all the textbooks - on directives . However, I do not teach harmony, I bring up a sense of harmony - in any case, I try; so my standard reaction is the following: "You forgot about the overtone scheme, that in the lowest register there are intervals of octave and 5. They always provide a good chord sound.The tertiary structures in a closed position are characteristic for octaves 3 and 4." At this point, the student knows why this sounds bad, and what effect this creates, which does not correspond to the spirit of tune and groove . And this is only a microscopic example.
Here is one more : in the 90s, I taught the highly talented concert jazz pianist with excellent absolute hearing. When she wanted to find a new voicing , she squinted her eyes, spread out her fingers and threw her hands randomly , hoping to catch something new. A good system to catch flies! smile
I had to explain to her that if there is a certain root, then from above there can be practically any combination of pitches - i.e. harmonics. It is required to put searches for relationships between themand with the root. This is a matter of choosing the interval structure and density in one or another chord register.It should be clear that this is not a matter of theory or schemes, but solely of hearing and its sensitivity. However, the overtones system can show directions; and this is already no too random ...

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765821
09/16/18 05:52 AM
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Maybe it's because the exposition of this approach looks rather opaque to me or perhaps it's one of those topics where my skepticism slides into fatigue. I'm a harmony junkie, have been since my mid-teens and, for sure, 'dissonance' is a factor but IMO it's also a personal aesthetic so I'm always unconvinced by definitions or attempts to quantify any aspect of it.

I can see you're enthusiastic and you say it gets results.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765826
09/16/18 06:49 AM
09/16/18 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by dire tonic
... for sure, 'dissonance' is a factor but IMO it's also a personal aesthetic ... can see you're enthusiastic and you say it gets results.
Personal aesthetic is the key word. I'm enthusiastic when the student finds his way, even if slightly different from Berklee College recipes .
Maybe you can understand , why in his case I'm not so enthusiastic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dMcIPUvTRU

Last edited by Nahum; 09/16/18 06:51 AM.
Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: dire tonic] #2765829
09/16/18 07:46 AM
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Originally Posted by dire tonic
Maybe it's because the exposition of this approach looks rather opaque to me or perhaps it's one of those topics where my skepticism slides into fatigue. I'm a harmony junkie, have been since my mid-teens and, for sure, 'dissonance' is a factor but IMO it's also a personal aesthetic so I'm always unconvinced by definitions or attempts to quantify any aspect of it.


There are so many different approaches which can lead to great results, that is what makes me sceptical of any one approach being the ‘correct’ one. Take the lydian chromatic concept for example, where the lydian chord is taken as the fundamental sound - I have heard some great compositions using techniques derived from that even if it not that popular these days. Or Messiaen’s modes of limited transposition - so much great Messiaen but not many people using that in a jazz context. Or Spud Murphys equal interval system - don’t know much about that but a lot of film composers seem to use it and I have heard some very interesting results. All this to me demonstrates that we can start in many different places with many different assumptions and progress along to amazing results. Just because one particular system works well does not negate the value of the others, they all share the physics of sound.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765834
09/16/18 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by beeboss
Or Spud Murphys equal interval system - don’t know much about that but a lot of film composers seem to use it and I have heard some very interesting results..
Beeboss, thanks for mentioning - I've never heard of him. This sound is familiar to me from the Impressionists; and I even once upon a time used it for tunes harmonization . But how far is it from Coltrane!

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: Nahum] #2765877
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Originally Posted by Nahum
But how far is it from Coltrane!


I guess it is all related. Wasn't Coltrane into the axis system of Bartok/Lendvai? That is in a sense an equal interval system I believe.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: beeboss] #2765878
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Originally Posted by beeboss
Originally Posted by Nahum
But how far is it from Coltrane!


I guess it is all related. Wasn't Coltrane into the axis system of Bartok/Lendvai? That is in a sense an equal interval system I believe.
I mean sound, not symmetry. Bartok's revolving wheel from cardboard is lying at my home on the table all the time.

Re: Reflections before the beginning of the academic year [Re: beeboss] #2765979
09/17/18 02:05 AM
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Originally Posted by beeboss
Or Spud Murphys equal interval system - don’t know much about that but a lot of film composers seem to use it and I have heard some very interesting results.

I'm probably too conservative for equal interval systems. I couldn't find any info about it that wasn't behind a paywall.

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