Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

Who's Online Now
79 registered members (Boboulus, anotherscott, Burkie, AZNpiano, 8ude, Blague, Anglagard44, 36251, 16 invisible), 3,245 guests, and 435 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2747611 06/27/18 07:24 PM
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 62
M
MICHAEL122 Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 62
I want to sincerely thank karvala for posting the Richter story with a nod to those who agreed.
It was inspirational to me and offered me consolation that at least one of the greats has to practice anything/something over&over&over.
I copied it to my "advice from the elites" document which i refer to from time to time.
I feel guilty, slow, dumb, and sort of feel like there's something wrong with me that i have to practice as hard and long as i do to get a piece {or measure or line or phrase} to an acceptable level especially knowing full well others don't.
Karvala's story made me feel a little better about myself and again my thanks to karvala for posting it.
I also admire those of you who have alluded that you can nail something in 5 to 15 minutes or complete a page of a piece in a week.
I'm very envious of that.
To those of you who suggest that something should not be practiced over&over and if you have to do that the piece is too hard; it's nice to say that and it is completely understandable why you postulate such a concept but i don't know any other way, although I liked the 7/3 rule and imagining it before putting fingers to keys helps, but the reality is simply not the same thing.
I am greatly attracted to the pieces i choose to learn, i will not give up on them just because it becomes difficult or frustrating {and given my past practicing experience I know that given enough time all obstacles are overcome - i've crossed out "cannot" and "can't" from my dictionary}, and my desire is to perform them well.
I'm a fourth of the way through the piece I'm currently learning and for the most part enjoying the time spent with it, just wish it would come together quicker, as is usual for me.
Just like you, all, i simply enjoy playing a piano; so very much, and life would be something less without it.
Hopefully someday i'll be as competent a pianist as you all are and i want to thank you for showing me what the goal should be.

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2747620 06/27/18 07:54 PM
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 496
J
John305 Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
J
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 496
MICHAEL122, we’re all different so we all need to find what works for us, it’s clearly not one size fits all. But we all do love our music and our pianos, or in other words, we’re all on the same journey but we all take our own unique path to get where we’re going.


It’s never too late to be what you might have been. -George Eliot
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2747626 06/27/18 08:13 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
Originally Posted by MICHAEL122
I want to sincerely thank karvala for posting the Richter story with a nod to those who agreed.
It was inspirational to me and offered me consolation that at least one of the greats has to]practice anything/something over&over&over.
But Richter almost all the time did not have to practice something over and over. No professional has to do this on a regular basis. They are capable of learning very difficult pieces in a very short amount of time so the incident mentioned is an outlier incident for Richter.

Originally Posted by MICHAEL122
I also admire those of you who have alluded that you can nail something in 5 to 15 minutes or complete a page of a piece in a week. I'm very envious of that.To those of you who suggest that something should not be practiced over&over and if you have to do that the piece is too hard; it's nice to say that and it is completely understandable why you postulate such a concept but i don't know any other way,
The obvious other way is to choose pieces that are at a suitable level for where you are now in terms of your piano skills. I think anyone who has to spend an entire week learning a page of music(I'm mean as a regular occurrence, not as an exception where there is one especially hard page in a piece or the piece is just a technical nightmare for even a professional, e.g. the hardest Chopin Etudes) is working on something way beyond what is appropriate.

I think the overwhelming majority of teachers would say the pieces you are trying to learn are not at an appropriate level. If you continue your present approach to learning piano it wil probably remain very frustrating for you, and it's also virtually universally agreed that spending most/all of your time on pieces that are too difficult is pedagogically unsound. So you can choose to continue what you are doing and be continually frustrated or you can adopt a reasonable, sound, and standard approach.

Do you have a teacher? What pieces are you working on right now?

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: John305] #2747627 06/27/18 08:16 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,485
NobleHouse Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 3,485
Originally Posted by John305
MICHAEL122, we’re all different so we all need to find what works for us, it’s clearly not one size fits all. But we all do love our music and our pianos, or in other words, we’re all on the same journey but we all take our own unique path to get where we’re going.


Well said! We all DO love our music and pianos. And we must all find our own unique path to get there!!



[Linked Image]
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: ghosthand] #2747631 06/27/18 08:25 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
Originally Posted by ghosthand
Also remember Liszt's terrific advice: "think ten times, play once". Let's say you struggle with a little section then, repeating it over and over without much of a progress. Now, remember Liszt, take your hands off the piano, be quiet, analyse what you just did, then repeat it mentally, the correct way, a few times. Maybe ten. And THEN you play again. You will be amazed how effective this method is, even though you haven't touched the keys at all!
I don't think this is what Liszt meant at all.
Originally Posted by ghosthand
If something is not working for you, it is better to take your time to investigate the causes and the possible solutions, instead of literally banging your head against the wall and exhaust your hands and arms. So, mindless repetitions for hours - that will not do you any good. Dare to go in clinch with the issues instead of hoping that they will vanish automatically if you just play again, and again, and again ...
I do think this is what Liszt meant.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: pianoloverus] #2748001 06/29/18 06:47 AM
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 254
G
ghosthand Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
G
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 254
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by ghosthand
Also remember Liszt's terrific advice: "think ten times, play once". Let's say you struggle with a little section then, repeating it over and over without much of a progress. Now, remember Liszt, take your hands off the piano, be quiet, analyse what you just did, then repeat it mentally, the correct way, a few times. Maybe ten. And THEN you play again. You will be amazed how effective this method is, even though you haven't touched the keys at all!
I don't think this is what Liszt meant at all.
Originally Posted by ghosthand
If something is not working for you, it is better to take your time to investigate the causes and the possible solutions, instead of literally banging your head against the wall and exhaust your hands and arms. So, mindless repetitions for hours - that will not do you any good. Dare to go in clinch with the issues instead of hoping that they will vanish automatically if you just play again, and again, and again ...
I do think this is what Liszt meant.



Well, who knows what he meant? And does it matter what he meant? Are we talking about good practice habits here, or about what the Master Liszt really meant or did not mean? I just said it was good advice, as I interpret it. Maybe he was just joking - well, I don't care. It is still a good phrase.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: ghosthand] #2748034 06/29/18 08:39 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
Originally Posted by ghosthand
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Originally Posted by ghosthand
Also remember Liszt's terrific advice: "think ten times, play once". Let's say you struggle with a little section then, repeating it over and over without much of a progress. Now, remember Liszt, take your hands off the piano, be quiet, analyse what you just did, then repeat it mentally, the correct way, a few times. Maybe ten. And THEN you play again. You will be amazed how effective this method is, even though you haven't touched the keys at all!
I don't think this is what Liszt meant at all.
Originally Posted by ghosthand
If something is not working for you, it is better to take your time to investigate the causes and the possible solutions, instead of literally banging your head against the wall and exhaust your hands and arms. So, mindless repetitions for hours - that will not do you any good. Dare to go in clinch with the issues instead of hoping that they will vanish automatically if you just play again, and again, and again ...
I do think this is what Liszt meant.



Well, who knows what he meant? And does it matter what he meant? Are we talking about good practice habits here, or about what the Master Liszt really meant or did not mean? I just said it was good advice, as I interpret it. Maybe he was just joking - well, I don't care. It is still a good phrase.
I don't think the first part I quoted was good advice if it's interpreted the way you said. That's why I distinguished between your two comments and said that your first interpretation of what Liszt said was not what I thought he meant. I think Liszt meant what you said in the second part I quoted.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748100 06/29/18 02:32 PM
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 254
G
ghosthand Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
G
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 254
Originally Posted by MICHAEL122

I also admire those of you who have alluded that you can nail something in 5 to 15 minutes or complete a page of a piece in a week.
I'm very envious of that.


Michael, first we have to conclude that some people lie. Not everyone, and many liars would not call themselves liars, they are just used to stretch the truth a bit. Or show just a part of it. I am not addressing anyone in particular in this particular forum; I speak about people in general.

I was taught to always tell the absolute truth and I have tried to be as honest as possible throughout my life. But many times I meet people who just ASSUME I lie, and this is probably because they live after that standard themselves.

Some piano students tell you that they practice 12 hours a day. You can intepret this as "12 hours a day, 365 days a year" but perhaps they mean "I did that ONCE" or even that they have their first practice session at 8 in the morning and their last at 8 in the evening, but inbetween those sessions they did other things. But the short version sounds better. They hope you will shout "WOW! You will be so good!" because they need to hear that. You can guess why.

It is the same with "learning a piece in 15 minutes". Perhaps they could do that once with something reasonably short and easy. I recently learned the first movement in a Clementi sonata in - well, not 15 minutes, but in less than two hours. Two pages. But is was very easy. In fact it just consisted of elements that I have practiced a million times before. And I did not say that I could play it absolutely flawless and at "performance level" at that time. And there are so many other pieces where I sit with the first bar only for ten minutes without getting it right. I have the greatest difficulties with Chopin, obviously he and I are not a perfect match made in heaven. Lovely music, but so hard for me to handle.

Actually, I am just like you. In fact, I believe most of us are. We practice and we practice, making every error possible, many times over, and we don't want to show the world what we are doing because we are a bit embarrassed. (Do you think progress is a straight line upwards? Not for me. I think I have got it, and then the backlashes line up.) I have felt like the Most Untalented Pianist Ever so many times. I also used to think that I had to practice much more than most people, because it could not be true that everyone has to struggle like me. It seems unrealistic ... when you watch others, it looks so easy! When you watch these little YouTube clips, "my way to learning Chopin Etude XX", you see 10 seconds of slow practice, then another 30 seconds of much better playing and then one minute of a nearly fully polished work. Wow! Well, I don't find these clips very accurate ...

You can also feel a bit discouraged when you have struggled with something for two months, and then you show it to your teacher who plays through the whole sh*t with sight-reading and it sounds soo much better than your present level. Gnnh. But be aware that sight-reading is an art as such, you train it separately, and you will quickly get better at it if you also train this. And good sight-reading is NOT the same as "nearly nailing" something. A piece at advanced level needs to be analyzed and worked with in so many layers on order to become a piece of art and not mechanical.

And when I have met some pianists in the global elite, I have been amazed by their stamina and patience, rather than their ability to learn anything in no time. They don't hesitate to work with the tiniest details, and to do it many times over. I believe we see the real difference between a pro and a mediocre amateur/beginner here: as amateurs, we tend to be a bit shallow. We think "a good pianist does not need to waste her time on this irrelevant little thing" and so we try to be good pianists by ourselves, neglecting our mistakes, not fixing them - instead we throw in yet one thousand repetitions and think this should do the trick. (Then we brag to other amateurs how much and long we practice, waiting for that "Wow ...")

I say: dare to be careful. Stop at every mistake, investigate if it needs further work, or if you just have to repeat the correct version 5 times in a row now, and never mind if you don't get to the end of the piece today. What matters is the quality of the end result, not how fast you learned and how few repetitions you needed to get there. If you repeat something many, many times, be sure to make every repetition totally perfect, or you will just engrave and enhance your mistakes! And if you really can do it perfectly, why bother doing it so many times?

Last edited by ghosthand; 06/29/18 02:37 PM.
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: pianoloverus] #2748101 06/29/18 02:34 PM
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 254
G
ghosthand Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
G
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 254
Originally Posted by pianoloverus
I don't think the first part I quoted was good advice if it's interpreted the way you said. That's why I distinguished between your two comments and said that your first interpretation of what Liszt said was not what I thought he meant. I think Liszt meant what you said in the second part I quoted.


It was advice based on my experience and it works fine for me.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748131 06/29/18 05:26 PM
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,058
W
Whizbang Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,058
Originally Posted by MICHAEL122

I also admire those of you who have alluded that you can nail something in 5 to 15 minutes or complete a page of a piece in a week.


If you think that people recommending working for 5 to 15 minutes are claiming that they can nail something in one go, you have badly misconstrued them.

The takeaway is that if you are not seeing progress within 5 minutes, you are possibly doing more harm than good.

The motor centers of your brain are pretty darn good at reproducing the movements that you program them with. If you grind away one hour, inputting the same wrong movements over and over, guess what is very likely to come out the next time you sit at the piano and ask your motor centers to "do that thing I taught you".

OTOH, if you work on a short section enough to make even a little progress, your brain can cement it while you sleep. When you go back the next day, it is often a little easier and more accurate. Do this over enough days and you will eventually crack it if the piece is in reach for you.

If you want to practice more than 5 minutes or 15 minutes, then do that by working on different sections.

Trust me, it is pretty darn hard to practice super mindfully and pretty darn easy to fall into a trap where you just try to repeat things a lot of times, hoping that things will just fix themselves. That latter way of practicing actually makes it harder for you to get the piece because your motor centers will be programmed with some wrong movements.


Whizbang
amateur ragtime pianist
https://www.youtube.com/user/Aeschala
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748165 06/29/18 08:41 PM
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 46
L
lizzie3 Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
L
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 46
Michael I am wondering if when you are learning a piece you aren't trying to learn to read the piece but instead are trying to memorize it? That would take me hours upon hours and I probably wouldn't be able to learn a piece.

Either way, don't give up. You sound very determined and if you are enjoying it, that is all that matters. You could also try learning 2 peices at once - one that you are interested in like you are currently learning, and one that is much much more simple so that you can lean in it a few weeks. It will be great for your confidence and will make your overall piano skills stronger.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: ghosthand] #2748172 06/29/18 09:41 PM
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 83
X
xyzzyFL Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
X
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 83
Originally Posted by ghosthand
Originally Posted by MICHAEL122

I also admire those of you who have alluded that you can nail something in 5 to 15 minutes or complete a page of a piece in a week.
I'm very envious of that.


Michael, first we have to conclude that some people lie. Not everyone, and many liars would not call themselves liars, they are just used to stretch the truth a bit. Or show just a part of it. I am not addressing anyone in particular in this particular forum; I speak about people in general.

I was taught to always tell the absolute truth and I have tried to be as honest as possible throughout my life. But many times I meet people who just ASSUME I lie, and this is probably because they live after that standard themselves.

Some piano students tell you that they practice 12 hours a day. You can intepret this as "12 hours a day, 365 days a year" but perhaps they mean "I did that ONCE" or even that they have their first practice session at 8 in the morning and their last at 8 in the evening, but inbetween those sessions they did other things. But the short version sounds better. They hope you will shout "WOW! You will be so good!" because they need to hear that. You can guess why.

It is the same with "learning a piece in 15 minutes". Perhaps they could do that once with something reasonably short and easy. I recently learned the first movement in a Clementi sonata in - well, not 15 minutes, but in less than two hours. Two pages. But is was very easy. In fact it just consisted of elements that I have practiced a million times before. And I did not say that I could play it absolutely flawless and at "performance level" at that time. And there are so many other pieces where I sit with the first bar only for ten minutes without getting it right. I have the greatest difficulties with Chopin, obviously he and I are not a perfect match made in heaven. Lovely music, but so hard for me to handle.

Actually, I am just like you. In fact, I believe most of us are. We practice and we practice, making every error possible, many times over, and we don't want to show the world what we are doing because we are a bit embarrassed. (Do you think progress is a straight line upwards? Not for me. I think I have got it, and then the backlashes line up.) I have felt like the Most Untalented Pianist Ever so many times. I also used to think that I had to practice much more than most people, because it could not be true that everyone has to struggle like me. It seems unrealistic ... when you watch others, it looks so easy! When you watch these little YouTube clips, "my way to learning Chopin Etude XX", you see 10 seconds of slow practice, then another 30 seconds of much better playing and then one minute of a nearly fully polished work. Wow! Well, I don't find these clips very accurate ...

You can also feel a bit discouraged when you have struggled with something for two months, and then you show it to your teacher who plays through the whole sh*t with sight-reading and it sounds soo much better than your present level. Gnnh. But be aware that sight-reading is an art as such, you train it separately, and you will quickly get better at it if you also train this. And good sight-reading is NOT the same as "nearly nailing" something. A piece at advanced level needs to be analyzed and worked with in so many layers on order to become a piece of art and not mechanical.

And when I have met some pianists in the global elite, I have been amazed by their stamina and patience, rather than their ability to learn anything in no time. They don't hesitate to work with the tiniest details, and to do it many times over. I believe we see the real difference between a pro and a mediocre amateur/beginner here: as amateurs, we tend to be a bit shallow. We think "a good pianist does not need to waste her time on this irrelevant little thing" and so we try to be good pianists by ourselves, neglecting our mistakes, not fixing them - instead we throw in yet one thousand repetitions and think this should do the trick. (Then we brag to other amateurs how much and long we practice, waiting for that "Wow ...")

I say: dare to be careful. Stop at every mistake, investigate if it needs further work, or if you just have to repeat the correct version 5 times in a row now, and never mind if you don't get to the end of the piece today. What matters is the quality of the end result, not how fast you learned and how few repetitions you needed to get there. If you repeat something many, many times, be sure to make every repetition totally perfect, or you will just engrave and enhance your mistakes! And if you really can do it perfectly, why bother doing it so many times?


Such good advice! Thank YOU! I really needed to hear this... need to re-read it on a daily basis for a while. I've been beating myself up over how many times I have to go over and over some passages with miniscule improvement - your comments have helped me to see I'm not alone and I need much more patience with myself. Again, Thank you GhostHand.


'Just Leap and the net will appear'
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748185 06/30/18 12:15 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,748
O
outo Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
O
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,748
So I think it must be clarified: I do not practice a section more than 5 or fiteen minutes because I learn it that fast. I practice it that little because I cannot concentrate on physical tasks longer and it starts getting worse, I get obsessive or unconsciously may start changing the way I do it every time to awake my brain. So I try to stop when I notice this and work on something else for another 5 or 15 minutes until again I lose my concentration and go to something else. I then get back to it next time and repeat this process many many times. But if I cannot see ANY progress in physically playing something after coming back to it many times, lets say a week, I often decide it is just too hard for me at this point. Or go to my teacher for technical help...

Memorization of a piece is another story...it can take me months and months to memorize something in whole and it does not seem to help to practice a lot in a short time, but rather the opposite: Take breaks and memorize again when partly forgotten. I also use some special techniques in memorization that I have found useful for myself and are purely for that purpose, not for initial learning to play the piece.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748228 06/30/18 06:40 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493
pianoloverus Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Online Content
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 26,493

In order to solve technical problems reasonably quickly(what this thread is really about, no?), one needs:

1. Sound basic technical training and understanding
2. The ability to analyze technical problems and find a solution vs. practicing a passage over and over hoping it will improve that way
3. Willingness to work on music of an appropriate technical difficulty




Last edited by pianoloverus; 06/30/18 06:42 AM.
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748289 06/30/18 10:31 AM
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 2,527
SwissMS Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 2,527
I find I do have one exception to the play a section 7 times correctly and move on. I use that method when I am first learning a piece. However, when I am in the polishing stage of a piece, I may play it for for an hour or more, record it, then go back and dissect the parts I was displeased with, and and then record it again. This can go on for a a couple of hours when I am trying to polish a piece. At the end of this kind of session, I play the piece slowly, error free before I put it away.

Re: OVER & OVER [Re: SwissMS] #2748306 06/30/18 11:17 AM
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 2,066
bSharp(C)yclist Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 2,066
Originally Posted by SwissMS
I find I do have one exception to the play a section 7 times correctly and move on. I use that method when I am first learning a piece.


I would agree with that, and should have made it clear when I mentioned it. In the beginning, you need sleep to get the piece to sink in. Once you've learned the piece, playing it for a longer time doesn't hurt I think, although I never really play anything more than 20 minutes at one sitting. I'll maybe get up and come back 20 minutes later, but I can't sit still for more than 15-20 minutes. Even at my lesson I find myself getting fidgety half way through.


♯ ♮ ♭ ø ° Δ ♩ ♪ ♫ ♬
YouTube | SoundCloud
[Linked Image]
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2748417 06/30/18 09:00 PM
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 101
LadyAcadia Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 101
Interesting question. . .this morning (Saturday) was the first time I could give a new piece more study. I think I spent about 2 hours give or take during a 3 hour practice session.

Started playing the piece at a slow tempo. When I encountered the first measure that proved difficult, I'll break it down by playing it hands separately, then together. Next I check in to see if the fingering is proper & gets the notes to flow smoothly. Then a few times with hands together and a metronome. It won't be perfect, but that's enough progress that I can come back to it later. I think the process took about 10 minutes for an easy measure 20 minutes for one with a lot of 4 or 5 note chords.

With a good night's sleep, i will tackle it again tomorrow. Weekends are a good time for me to tackle a new piece of this size (4 pages).

Good luck with your practice!


Dona Nobis Pacem
Yamaha DGX 660 (portable 88)
[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: OVER & OVER [Re: MICHAEL122] #2752520 07/19/18 12:14 AM
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,941
LisztAddict Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,941
http://www.interlude.hk/front/ten-tips-productive-practice/

4. Stay Focussed and Avoid Repeating Mistakes

Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Beethoven 1808 Benefit Concert Recreated
by BeeZee4 - 01/22/20 04:20 PM
Kurzweil Forte SE-88
by pauleway - 01/22/20 04:19 PM
DEWALT 23" shop stool for playing piano
by Abdol - 01/22/20 03:12 PM
Kawai CA99 vs Casio Celviano GP510
by ChrisGoesPiano - 01/22/20 03:02 PM
Rich Galassini / Cunningham piano = the worst
by mmbl - 01/22/20 12:06 PM
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics196,451
Posts2,915,835
Members95,696
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3