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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: pianopi] #2730831
04/22/18 10:38 AM
04/22/18 10:38 AM
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I'm the one who started the bit which led to the "boring" comment, which led to a fair bit of feedback. Pianopi, I'd like to get a dialogue going so that we all truly hear each other and I was rather cryptic in my response - I framed my response to you as I did, because I wanted to make sure that you were hearing the whole of what I written including what I stressed. But neither of us really has an idea of where the other is coming from (yet).

Pianopi, you started with "-interest in things is kindled sometimes by a teacher or mentor explaining/showing passionately what is interesting about a subject."

If I were to watch you teach a couple of students over a period of time I would get a picture of what you do when you show or explain things "passionately". Your "passionate" explanation might be backed by very deep knowledge that you can dig into, and present in a way understandable to the student, so he can start truly growing out of that embryonic understanding. He may want to learn more things on his own (your "kindled"). But you might also be a teacher who tries for "passion" by opening your eyes wide Polka Dot Door-style, and use an animated excited voice - this does exist (maybe a fair bit). Or you might be a superb musician, play music in a moving way (which the student can't possibly reach), play recordings of wonderful musicians - in this case: unless the students are also given the tools, so they can achieve things, it is not enough.

Where I'd like to be heard is this: When a student of any age starts being able to achieve things, this boosts confidence and excitement. Sometimes it leads to creativity, experimentation, and discovery. Teaching to play a musical instrument is tricky and difficult - there aren't that many who do it really well from what I've seen. You are teaching skills, coordination, and the senses to "hear". If these don't develop, then the student will continually fail or fall short, and especially for a student who is interested and passionate, that can be torturous. I put skills on a high priority, because I've seen what their lack can do. I have seen this as a student of music at an adult age, and I have also seen it when I did remediation type teach of kids in areas like math.

I don't know whether a teacher who is putting his all into transmitting skills can be "bored", because that investment takes attention and energy. He might be. If you teach kids for 20 years to figure out 1+1=2, the topic is boring, but their growth and learning style is not. Your growth as a teacher may not stay stagnant. But to answer the question: If I had a choice of 2 teachers: no. 1 is bored but able to give me the skills for my own progress -- no. 2 is as enthusiastic as heck but leaves me continually struggling ---- in that case I'll chose no. 1. If two teachers can both transmit skills, I might choose the one who shows greater interest.

Last edited by keystring; 04/22/18 07:50 PM.
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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2730838
04/22/18 11:01 AM
04/22/18 11:01 AM
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Now that we're talking about regrets and motivation, I'd like to add that IMO, most children starting lessons have no specific motivation to learn - or keep learning - and it's their parents who buy the piano (if they don't already have one in the home) and start them on it. What happens after that is predominantly down to how the teacher gets the kid on her side, and - yes - inspire him. Parents can help or hinder, but ultimately, whatever they do, it's the kid who has to keep practicing.

Initially, the kid will treat the piano as a 'plaything', maybe a new toy. It might just pique his interest when he realizes that he can produce interesting sounds, maybe even a tune on it. Without a good teacher, that rapidly palls. I saw that happening with someone I actually helped to buy a new piano for his daughter, who pestered him for it when she was six. A few years later, that nice new grand has become an expensive piece of furniture, because the parents ignored my advice and decided that they could teach her by themselves using YouTube (neither of them knows anything about music, BTW). Talk about the completely blind leading the partially sighted.....

When I was a kid, just starting to learn English (at nine) in my home country, my parents bought a set of books called 'Children's World' to help my reading practice. They had no idea what level of English was required to read those hefty volumes - it was two years before I could begin to understand many of the words, with the help of a dictionary wink . But they were a revelation for me as an insight into the Western world, and the world of Western art.....and music.

That was where I read a funny and insightful story about a boy who hated to practice the piano, blaming his horrible upright piano which made a horrible sound. One day, a wizard visited him as he was practicing. When asked, the boy immediately started a tirade against his piano and music, because the piano refused to give him nice or interesting sounds, and he hated practicing. Whereupon the wizard asked the boy to climb up on top of the piano, so that he could experience the piano when the wizard played it. The latter started gently and sweetly, and the kid felt like he was being transported to the Elysian Fields. Suddenly, a storm blew up, and he was buffeted by strong winds and rain, with thunder & lightning getting closer by the minute. He'd never been so scared, yet so thrilled, in what was the ride of his life. In his mundane life so far, he'd never experienced anything like it, and he wanted it to keep going, to see what happened next.

But eventually, the wizard wound down and finished the piece, and everything went back to normal. The boy wanted the wizard to keep going, but the latter told him he'd have to learn to play it himself to experience all those sensations again, and there was nothing wrong with the piano at all. He just had to master it.

The kid, now realizing his piano could give him all those amazing feelings and sensations once he could play it sufficiently well, went back to practicing with a vigor, and listening to what his teacher taught him. He never forgot the wizard and kept hoping he'd pay him another visit, but he never did. But several years later, he was finally able to play with the same musicality as well as the power and virtuosity that he once experienced from the wizard, and could experience those same sensations again without the wizard's help. He'd become.......an excellent pianist. thumb

I was an impressionable kid, and my first teacher made a great impression on me by playing me a classical piece (after she'd weaned me off "Love Story", that is) after every lesson. Not quite thunder & lightning like that wizard, but pretty close in some of the pieces she played. That was why, from a talentless kid who initially started lessons just to keep up with the Joneses (from my parents' perspective), I became completely immersed in the piano and classical music, and rapidly discovered that with each passing month, I was able to play more & more interesting music, and didn't want to stop until.......I could experience those thunderstorms as well as Elysium in my playing grin.

P.S I've posted this story about the wizard before in PW (in Pianist Corner, I think), but it made such an impression on me as a kid that I never forgot it. Especially during times when I didn't feel like practicing or just felt lazy......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2730841
04/22/18 11:23 AM
04/22/18 11:23 AM
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I don't think I ever mentioned not teaching the necessary skills.

Passion finds its way into many things: you can be passionate at discovering effective ways to practice; you can be passionate at finding new ways to kindle - yes, kindle - a student's interest in a subject; you can be passionate about teaching in general and what it means in a broad sense etc.

I don't think I mentioned, either, that passion was a Mt. Vesuvius event, gushing itself selfishly all over the poor students. Passion doesn't have to be showy. To me it is more a deep conviction in what one is doing.

To sum up my thoughts, I started in this thread by responding to AZPiano in full support of his wish to relieve himself of some trying students. Thinking further, though, I thought "are we being too selfish?". And, in the light of an Albert Schweitzer heal-the-world mentality, along with a no-child-left-behind idea, I thought I would put it forward that we should give it one more try, But then, again, I could be wrong. I often am.


"Genius is not the sign of demigodliness, but the sign of having a profoundly practical mind" - anonymous

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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Gary D.] #2730899
04/22/18 03:34 PM
04/22/18 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.


...There are two ways to get students to succeed.

1. Make them do what we want, and with enough power and enough consequences we can make people do what they hate, and do it well. This will likely destroy them as human beings, ultimately, but they will do what we demand if we can beat them and humiliate them if they do not do as we demand.

2. Help them develop a love for what they are learning.

Number two is harder, way harder, but when it succeeds it will work for a lifetime, and they young children we help will ultimately respect us, at the least, and they may become future friends.

Number one is all about power, and fear, and any kind of success accomplished with such tactics results in incalculable damage, which in my view is never worth the results in being able to do something.


I think it is probably unreasonable to expect that everyone will love the same things.

I believe strongly that it is important for children to learn to tell the difference between things they like and things they do not like, and to learn to express their opinions appropriately.

I also believe that all of us must sometimes do things that we don't like. Another important skill is to learn which things must be done even though we don't like them (like completing paperwork or filing taxes) and which things must not be tolerated (like being abused).

When children are not permitted to experience their own likes and dislikes I believe they are less able to make appropriate decisions in many areas of life.


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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2730937
04/22/18 06:20 PM
04/22/18 06:20 PM
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Somehow the comment feels like apples and oranges, but I can't express it. Maybe someone else who sees it can do better?

Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731004
04/23/18 12:44 AM
04/23/18 12:44 AM
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Originally Posted by AZNpiano
I'll field a few questions here:

Originally Posted by Andamento
2. What do you see as the most important aspects of what you do? Building a strong foundation in absolute beginners? Helping transfer students with spotty musical skills get on the right track? Preparing advanced students for high-level competitions and/or future careers in music? Within which age or ability level(s) are your strengths as a teacher best utilized?

The most important thing I can do is to build up good students from the ground up. I've had enough transfer students to fill seven Olympic-sized pools (quite literally). I actually don't want advanced transfers, because chances are they'll be filled with problems that, by the time I'm done solving the problems, they'll be in college.

Give me 10 brand new students who can actually tell lines from spaces, and I'll be happy. And, yes, I have students who can't even tell lines from spaces, or something as ludicrous as that. This is the type of schmucks I'm working with right now, and I'm at my wit's end.

Originally Posted by Andamento
3. Think about the personality of the students with whom you have the best teacher-student "fit." Do you anticipate that prospective students are a better match than some of your current crop of students?

I'd like to work with kids who can actually think. They don't need to be super smart, but it's getting to the point that I'll be happy to work with kids who have average intelligence.

The influx of students will all be transfer students who were promised to me from teachers who are either retiring or moving. I'm guessing not all of them will be below-average in intelligence.


Wow, you're like Moses' sidekick. wow

Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: pianopi] #2731019
04/23/18 02:06 AM
04/23/18 02:06 AM
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Orange County, CA
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Originally Posted by pianopi
To sum up my thoughts, I started in this thread by responding to AZPiano in full support of his wish to relieve himself of some trying students. Thinking further, though, I thought "are we being too selfish?".

No. A line must be drawn somewhere.


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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731073
04/23/18 08:01 AM
04/23/18 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by pianopi
To sum up my thoughts, I started in this thread by responding to AZPiano in full support of his wish to relieve himself of some trying students. Thinking further, though, I thought "are we being too selfish?".

No. A line must be drawn somewhere.

Last week out of the blue we got a letter from our family doctor. He is semi-retiring, has been trying like crazy to find physicians to take on his patients, can't find any, and we should all try to ask family and friends to get their doctor to take us (all) in. We're high and dry in a few weeks. In private music lessons there is a dual commitment between teacher and student. The student isn't looking for another teacher, because she has one. If a teacher has the opportunity of new students better suited to what he wants to do, and needs to make room for them by letting go of "less suitable" students, those students have to find another teacher. It makes sense to give them a heads up, and maybe suggest someone if you possibly can. If a student has been undermining his own progress by not practising or whatever, then imho he shouldn't just be told of "exciting new opportunities" but what is really going on, and maybe even he'll change his ways. If the student is a "transfer wreck", ruined by previous teaching, then you don't want that poor shnook to bounce from teacher to teacher who doesn't know what to do with him. He's been confused enough already.

Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731078
04/23/18 08:24 AM
04/23/18 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by AZNpiano
In anticipation of getting many news prospective students this coming summer, I need to find diplomatic ways of "firing" existing students. I'm having some problems:

1) Students who are considered family friends

2) Students who were referred by other existing students

3) Students who referred other kids to my studio

4) The non-progressing, deadbeat students who have been with me for many years, whose parents are great people

In the past, when I fired students, that was done with much anger and frustration. I don't really need to "fire" any of these students right now, but eventually I think parting ways may be best for all parties involved.

Thoughts?


I suggest making it less emotional and personal and keep it simple--no extraneous explanations. Announce a new policy for next year:


"Studio Policy for School Year 2018-2019

I expect students in my studio to practice regularly. If a student is not making progress week after week due to insufficient practice, I reserve the right to terminate lessons. I will be able to refer the student to other area teachers if the student desires to continue music lessons."


Difficult with family friends, admittedly. Soften the blow by several warnings and an a straight-forward talk with the students and the parents. BUT that process is easier with a written policy in place first.

You may ask all students to keep a practice log, like Gary D. if you want. That's good for making the students and parents aware of your standard.

A simple standard/message such as "regular practice" is easier to process for parents and students if it is a major theme in your new year (posters in your studio?). You'll gradually weed out the disinterested students. You may even get more practice out of some of them!

If anyone asks you why, you can say at this point in your career, it's a personal decision, a change you need to make.

I'm sure you have some angst just holding on to these students year after year, because you really are a softy :-) There is nothing wrong with adjusting your studio standards. Teachers have different specializations due to their ideals, personal mandates, and skills. You have enough years of experience and reputation to make adjustments to your studio. Just make them out front.




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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731091
04/23/18 09:26 AM
04/23/18 09:26 AM
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Williamsburg, VA
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I actually don't want advanced transfers, because chances are they'll be filled with problems that, by the time I'm done solving the problems, they'll be in college.


Alas, you wouldn't have been able to work with my kid then. smile

I do think you would have enjoyed working with him. Isn't this the value of an interview and a few preview lessons?

Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Piano*Dad] #2731491
04/24/18 04:55 PM
04/24/18 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Piano*Dad
Quote
I actually don't want advanced transfers, because chances are they'll be filled with problems that, by the time I'm done solving the problems, they'll be in college.


Alas, you wouldn't have been able to work with my kid then. smile

I do think you would have enjoyed working with him. Isn't this the value of an interview and a few preview lessons?

Well, in my experience, almost all the "advanced" transfer students came with baggage. And by the time they're done with me, we haven't finished unpacking yet.

Let's face it: The really good students, at that level, probably won't want to change teachers, unless their family is moving. Or unless the teacher is retiring.

At that level, the students that ARE changing teachers are probably under these situations:

1) The previous teacher has done all he/she could. The student outplayed the teacher.

2) The previous teacher raised fees, and the family is unwilling (or unable) to pay that higher fee.

3) The student and the previous teacher got into some dispute or argument.

My most recent advanced transfers are #1 and #3. The #1 kid is wonderful as a person, but his problems are SO VAST, the only way it would have gotten this bad is that the previous teacher is completely incompetent.

The #3 came to me with the wish to skip CM levels and finish the test. Her problems are even worse.

Both of these kids are extremely intelligent, but they have been misguided and mistaught for so long, there's only so much I can do.


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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: gingko2] #2731494
04/24/18 05:09 PM
04/24/18 05:09 PM
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Orange County, CA
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Originally Posted by gingko2
I'm sure you have some angst just holding on to these students year after year, because you really are a softy :-)

No, not really, I'm just paying bills. These are the students I force myself to accept, because I need $$$.

I could raise standards all I want, but the kids are not going to meet them. My goal is to find better replacements. At this point, "better" simply means kids who will practice 20 minutes a week.

This is how bad my kids/parents are right now. One family wanted their son to take CM test. First year, fine. Second year, the Mom complained that she's tired of hearing the same scales, chord progressions, and pieces over and over again. So SHE took her son out of CM.

I have a secondary problem with scheduling because almost all of my students are doing 48 other extracurricular activities. I get re-scheduling requests left and right. The only reason I have a sustainable studio is that I am more flexible than my colleagues, and I do everything I can to accommodate everybody's schedule. But it got to a point, especially when a sport season starts, that the entire schedule descends into chaos. I teach an unusual number of boys in my studio, and they all do swimming, soccer, tennis, or basketball. And I have one kid who's playing baseball and their weeknight games change EVERY week. I'm this close to moving that kid to Sunday night.


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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731550
04/24/18 10:07 PM
04/24/18 10:07 PM
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Williamsburg, VA
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Quote
Well, in my experience, almost all the "advanced" transfer students came with baggage. And by the time they're done with me, we haven't finished unpacking yet.

Let's face it: The really good students, at that level, probably won't want to change teachers, unless their family is moving. Or unless the teacher is retiring.


I'm really sorry that this has been your experience in your market. But I wouldn't generalize your experience quite so forcefully. Others may have had very different experiences.

I think you have left out some of the possibilities. Well, I know you have, because my situation was one of them (but I won't try to generalize from it ... grin ). Yet I don't think my experience is at all unique. Not the norm, I'm sure, but not one in a million either.

If baggage is defined as imperfections that require lots of work to improve, then every student comes with baggage. In my own case a few years back, "I" made the decision to offer my kid the opportunity to work with a different teacher. Note the language, ... opportunity. I have no idea if he had exhausted the possibilities with his first teacher. I'm sure she didn't think so. But I thought that there might be a benefit from a change of scenery, so to speak. Move to a teacher whose own pianism was at a much higher level, and who taught at a university level and performed frequently in public. That would seem to be a decent motive to think about a switch, especially for a late middle-school aged student, and it's a different reason than exhaustion, moving, a teacher raising fees, or contention between teacher and family. Did he come with baggage? Of course. Tightness here, stylistic problems there, musical approach this way instead of that way, important repertoire unexplored. Could his original teacher have worked on those. Yeah, I'm sure she could have, and probably had some of them diagnosed for future work. If you find a thirteen year old who is perfect, who needs a teacher!

By contrast, when "I" was young, I was indeed the high school kid with real and obvious baggage! The teacher at the local university who adopted me most certainly did not have enough time to "fix" me before I went off to college. She had less than two years. But I worked hard and improved. She did what she could, and I think she was content with what she (we) accomplished. You define your own level of satisfaction in what you can accomplish.

Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Piano*Dad] #2731594
04/25/18 04:00 AM
04/25/18 04:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Piano*Dad

If baggage is defined as imperfections that require lots of work to improve, then every student comes with baggage.

Nothing to add.

We all have baggage, students and teachers. I'm months away from age 70, but in the last year I've discovered a number of things that make me a much better teacher. Does this mean I was a horrible teacher last year, or the year before, or decade before? wink


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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Gary D.] #2731630
04/25/18 07:57 AM
04/25/18 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by Piano*Dad

If baggage is defined as imperfections that require lots of work to improve, then every student comes with baggage.

Nothing to add.

We all have baggage, students and teachers. I'm months away from age 70, but in the last year I've discovered a number of things that make me a much better teacher. Does this mean I was a horrible teacher last year, or the year before, or decade before? wink


As Teachers or Students of anything, the key is to be always learning. I, for one, have not met too many perfect people.

Last edited by NobleHouse; 04/25/18 07:58 AM.

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Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731649
04/25/18 09:25 AM
04/25/18 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by gingko2
I'm sure you have some angst just holding on to these students year after year, because you really are a softy :-)

No, not really, I'm just paying bills. These are the students I force myself to accept, because I need $$$.

I could raise standards all I want, but the kids are not going to meet them. My goal is to find better replacements.


I think you may partly be the source of your own problems. If you are "forcing" yourself to accept students that you know have little chance of being successful you shouldn't complain about the outcome which shouldn't be surprising. I would think the ethical thing to do is to drop these students as soon as possible or don't accept them at all, or raise your standards of teaching whether it be dedication, motivation, teaching style to get through to these students, but I wouldn't lead them on. I'm sure their parents would be relieved their children aren't simply a source of easy income. I think it is important for all of us to examine why we chose our professions in the first place and rekindle some the passion that led to that career choice, and if we can't revive it, get out of it.

Last edited by Jethro; 04/25/18 09:28 AM.
Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: AZNpiano] #2731655
04/25/18 09:52 AM
04/25/18 09:52 AM
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Williamsburg, VA
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Jethro, What makes you think that AZN is "leading them on... ?" I have never gotten that impression from what he has said. Likewise, "their parents" have all sorts of understandings and motivations, and I have never gotten the impression that AZN has tried to deceive people. If a parent wants to park junior at piano lessons because it's a good "extra-curricular," and perhaps because the parent needs the time to go shopping, those motives are fulfilled even if junior isn't a sparkling student passionately committed to musical excellence. I "get" AZN's venting, even as I'm cautioning him not to overgeneralize from his experiences. Who wouldn't want motivated and talented students? Who wouldn't feel some frustration at seeing parents whose attitudes were seemingly so antithetical to musical learning? Teaching students to pay the bills isn't a crime, and it isn't unethical. I'm sure it isn't particularly satisfying, which likely accounts for AZN's angst. I do agree, however, that there is always wisdom in trying to rekindle the passion that led to the career choice. It's easy to let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Even if a student is far from the "model," you can do a good job with that student, given the constraints, and take some satisfaction in that.

Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Piano*Dad] #2731661
04/25/18 10:22 AM
04/25/18 10:22 AM
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Jethro Offline
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Originally Posted by Piano*Dad
Jethro, What makes you think that AZN is "leading them on... ?" I have never gotten that impression from what he has said. Likewise, "their parents" have all sorts of understandings and motivations, and I have never gotten the impression that AZN has tried to deceive people. If a parent wants to park junior at piano lessons because it's a good "extra-curricular," and perhaps because the parent needs the time to go shopping, those motives are fulfilled even if junior isn't a sparkling student passionately committed to musical excellence. I "get" AZN's venting, even as I'm cautioning him not to overgeneralize from his experiences. Who wouldn't want motivated and talented students? Who wouldn't feel some frustration at seeing parents whose attitudes were seemingly so antithetical to musical learning? Teaching students to pay the bills isn't a crime, and it isn't unethical. I'm sure it isn't particularly satisfying, which likely accounts for AZN's angst. I do agree, however, that there is always wisdom in trying to rekindle the passion that led to the career choice. It's easy to let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Even if a student is far from the "model," you can do a good job with that student, given the constraints, and take some satisfaction in that.


Trust me I get it. I completely understand teachers wanting motivated students, practicing students, less bothersome parents and maybe I'm misreading AZN's descriptions of the "below average intellgence smucks" he has to deal with on a daily basis. If he had taken the time to explain to these parents that their children show little promise because they are not practicing, that he'd rather teach other children who put in better effort or motivation, and he'd rather they find another teacher for his/her child, I would not have any problem with this. It is clearly any teacher's prerogative to choose whomever they wanted to teach. If they wanted to take only "talented" students who show promise, I'd say go for it.

BUT here's the problem I'm having. If a teacher appears to be stringing students along to the "pay the bills" and asking me what he has to do now that he has better options in the immediate future, and that he has all but "fired" the undesirable students other that the students of "family friends" or "great people" to whom he is having difficulty coming up with a strategy, I'd say he was leading people on for some time. Others might not see it this way, but I do. It's not my position to tell anyone how to run their business, and I'm not fooling myself here, I recognize it is a business, but even business has ethics. All I'm saying that the ethical thing to do is to be upfront with the parents of these kids and tell them as soon as possible he would rather not teach them and not wait until you saw another opportunity- which could be what, weeks, months, years??? Or as I said, examine YOUR teaching methods and see if you can get through to these kids.

Edit: Also I have no problem with teacher's teaching children who they personally believe do not have the greatest potential (because it IS business) or maybe barely any potential at all, because they believe maybe they could teach them something, whether it be discipline, some musical concepts, a few easy pieces, whatever- and especially if their parents insist upon it after parent teacher discussion. But to be able to teach anyone, the teacher must first, at the very least, believe the child has some potential. If you start the conversation with all I am seeing are below average intelligence schmucks, your complaints are going to fall on deaf ears and I'm sorry, but I think you are not in the right frame of mind to be teaching anyone.

Last edited by Jethro; 04/25/18 03:18 PM.
Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Piano*Dad] #2731662
04/25/18 10:26 AM
04/25/18 10:26 AM
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Posts: 408
west central MA
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west central MA
Oh, remember, AZN said he didn't have any angst :-)

(maybe "protests too much..")

Originally Posted by Piano*Dad
[quote]

......By contrast, when "I" was young, I was indeed the high school kid with real and obvious baggage! The teacher at the local university who adopted me most certainly did not have enough time to "fix" me before I went off to college. She had less than two years. But I worked hard and improved. She did what she could, and I think she was content with what she (we) accomplished. You define your own level of satisfaction in what you can accomplish.


I would think most teachers are happy with any student who is willing to work and improve--even transfer wrecks. Not interested in making it personal, but I'm definitely a transfer wreck and am so grateful to my teacher who deals with any bad habit, misinstruction, or lack of instruction that I bring. I find it rewarding to work these kinks out. I think it's rewarding to her--but she has bulldog persistence and incredible patience.

If the students practices and works hard, tries to follows the teacher's instructions, what else could you expect in a community studio? Really?

But many don't practice. Regular practice is the bottom line, I would think. Why not at least try to get everyone on board with a practice ethic?

Teach the students you want to teach, but be clear and upfront about your minimum standard.

Yes, and I think it's fine to vent.


[Linked Image][Linked Image]

Charles Walter 1500, Kawai CA63
Re: How to "Fire" Students Nicely [Re: Jethro] #2731696
04/25/18 12:38 PM
04/25/18 12:38 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
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Canada
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Canada
Originally Posted by Jethro
BUT here's the problem I'm having. .....

I responded to your other post that you wrote as a person running a business. There was no response to that one (maybe it wasn't seen) so I will keep my thoughts to myself on this one. I do not see the attitude that you have surmised, and I do see a situation.

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