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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726473
04/04/18 10:38 AM
04/04/18 10:38 AM
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Adam, very thought provoking post.. Thank you! When I started teaching, as most of us on PTF, I was fresh out of college, trained by excellent teachers, and had such high aspirations for each of my students! Over time, as I dealt with students forgetting or losing their music, no shows, missing recitals for "lego" competitions, ignoring assignments, not doing theory work, playing too loud, too fast, etc, not liking any music offered to them, I realized those aspirations had to be lowered.

After some of the critiques some of the students received at the last Festival, I had to take some responsibility for overlooking students' lower evaluations--I have not been consistent at every lesson in assuring that the student follow the basic concepts, and have worried more about being "nice" and "positive" rather than being "honest" as Gary D. has pointed out.

I feel that I've failed in my duty to prepare this student to be independent of me on some level.


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726479
04/04/18 11:17 AM
04/04/18 11:17 AM
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A story: Around the time when I first joined PW, I decided to volunteer-teach rudimentary theory to a young woman I ran into on-line who was in a situation of poverty in some area of the world where no teachers or material could be had. She was very eager, and was mixing herself up by grabbing things willy nilly from the net. It was wonderful because of the combination of her attitude and my efforts. She was eager.

I told this student that I would teach her for free, but only if she followed my instructions. For me, I could review the theory I had learned and try out my thoughts on how I would have liked to have learned it. While we were in different countries and I had not done this before, I did have my teacher training in knowing how to organize course work which is what I did. In the beginning I guided her with some principles on how she was to work, and I gave feedback for every assignment including on how she had worked if the results were off for that reason. She applied herself each time, immediately. In the way she worked, persevered, manner of doing things, enthusiasm etc.this was a "gem of a student" (as one experienced music teacher told me, when I shared some of it). It was very rewarding.

At the end of this I had the material I had created for the course: sound files, resources and links etc.; an outline of how to proceed, what had worked well. I could have gone on to teach this, and even for payment, but opted not to. Why? Because I wouldn't get the same kind of student, and if it was commercially for money, I'd have to accept anyone, under all circumstances - like you guys (more or less).

There was actually a need for what I had created. I worked through the RCM syllabus using the Wharram book, and many private students over here do the exams for the three levels of rudiments. A British teacher, where ABRSM(?) has the same role, told me how it's hard for private teachers to squeeze this in as well. I saw at least one teacher in this country offer on-line group lessons for the three levels, doing what I had just done. His students would meet in a group lesson on-line once a week, send him their homework, for his feedback individually. I could do that. But I'd be getting students who had to study the material for the sake of passing an exam. They would not necessarily be wiling to work as hard or as hand-in-hand as my "gem of a student" had done. Some might be mistaught about theory or confused about some theory thing because of what had happened in private lessons, so there could be conflict. It might become quite a head-ache, and unpleasant. In volunteer-teaching I could drop a student if that person didn't want to do the work; or the student could drop the lessons if he/she discovered they weren't interested. You don't have that when you're teaching privately.

Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: Zaphod] #2726530
04/04/18 02:12 PM
04/04/18 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Zaphod
Well you know, you can lead a horse to water etc.

Free market - Just as your students have a right to pick a different teacher, you have the right to pick different students. I feel this current situation is unfair on you, as you seem to be interested in teaching someone who is actually rewarding to teach. I know there's loyalty and all that, but not when it's sucking the life out of things.

In my experience, which is limited, granted, compared to some on here, having had other practicing pianists around me for the best part of a decade when I was younger, some people respond and some don't. Hopefully I was one of the ones that did, or at least I tried to be. I was interested in playing the right notes at the right speed with the right musical interpretations according to the guides set up by the sheet music, at the very least. And piano was my second instrument, not even my first.

Just sounds like, to be honest these students are lemons. Lost causes, let's be "frank" again. You need to gradually phase them out, and phase new ones in. Or be stuck with them and have a frustrating time of it. But I don't think they magically turn in to responsive students. The choice is yours.

For the record, confusing thread, especially in that middle bit about the bullying stuff, but anyway, I'm used to having every minor discrepancy pointed out to me, every wrong note, every missed dynamic, speed discrepancies, wrong fingerings, everything. And that was when I was an early teenager. And I liked heavy rock music, and flashy fast guitar playing and stuff, but I took the piano seriously. I can't speak for anyone else, but my teacher would get irritated if I hadn't obviously put in my required amount of practice every week. To be taught by him was a privilege. Can't speak for other members of this board, but that was my experience. So I don't think a slightly stern style of teaching is bullying, so long as one keeps it to do with the piano, and doesn't start getting personal with it.

You wouldn't expect everyone to be the best who comes to you, but it just sounds like your current ones are not listening to you really, they hear you but they don't listen. Or understand, seemingly. What you want to see is effort, and it doesn't sound like they're really applying themselves.

I would like to see you trade these pupils for ones that were actually interested in making headway with the craft. And then be quite strict with them in your teaching. I'm sorry if that comes across a bit callous. But I'm sure this would result in great satisfaction for you.

One might also say on the flip side, if this is how you earn your living then you need them for your money, but you still have the right to sack them, there is a limit to what one can take, any job is like that.

Edit - Seems you work in a music store. Does this mean you don't get a say in which pupils you have? If so, the only thing I can think of is to give them stuff that suits their style, that's about all you can do really.



Adam, I still require meet and greets before agreeing to take on a new student. We also have the ability to drop a student, however, the store really watches retention rates, so I hesitate to drop the students that exhaust me, which, right now, would be 4 students.

I just want my students to learn the basics of musicianship, to practice and to hopefully enjoy playing the piano as much as possible. I want them to look back on piano lessons with me with some level of joy, and not regret. However, that doesn't mean I should settle for disregard of most of basic concepts. Many of our students are "lemons" for sure. Transfer wrecks, students who never practice, lose music, forget their books, or are being forced to take lessons so parents can shop in peace.


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726562
04/04/18 05:24 PM
04/04/18 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by chasingrainbows

Adam, I still require meet and greets before agreeing to take on a new student. We also have the ability to drop a student, however, the store really watches retention rates, so I hesitate to drop the students that exhaust me, which, right now, would be 4 students.


I wish I could say "I'm Adam Madam". But unfortunately I'm Zaphod. Or did you mean "Adam and I", Adam being your boss? No matter, unimportant.

Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
I just want my students to learn the basics of musicianship, to practice and to hopefully enjoy playing the piano as much as possible. I want them to look back on piano lessons with me with some level of joy, and not regret. However, that doesn't mean I should settle for disregard of most of basic concepts.


Quite right, and as you well know, the two go hand in hand. One without the other is no use.

Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
Many of our students are "lemons" for sure. Transfer wrecks, students who never practice, lose music, forget their books, or are being forced to take lessons so parents can shop in peace.


I think you should have a word with your boss (Adam?) - you need to look after your own health first and foremost, both mentally and physically, and if you will allow me to say so, your tone in this thread is one of exasperation, although admittedly it is only written and therefore hard to judge, but I've noticed it. Perhaps I'm mistaken, but one worries about your health in this regard, and I think that it's more important for you to cleanse yourself of this purgatory that you seem to be in by ditching the waste of time students.

Perhaps you might want to have a word with your boss about a condition being attached to lessons - the student needs the right attitude. Talent is not necessarily required, but attitude and effort is. For example, I attend martial art classes, and this is the philosophy. If one is seen to be not taking it seriously, one will get asked to not return. I've seen it happen many times.

Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: AZNpiano] #2726590
04/04/18 07:17 PM
04/04/18 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
but not at his level.

So, what "level" do you think your student is really at?

I've had students waltz into my studio having passed level 7, when in fact they are really at level 2. I don't hesitate to educate the parents about their kids' numerous deficiencies.

Most kids can advance one level per year. I've had the little geniuses that can do three levels. And I'm sure right now the dim-wits that fill my studio probably need four years to progress one level.


He's playing Level 4-5 pieces AZN.


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: Gary D.] #2726770
04/05/18 02:24 PM
04/05/18 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
We could start a new thread "Parents that exhaust our energy." smile

Frankly, that's where the real problem is.


What the world needs is an academic innovation: a dual major in piano pedagogy and marriage counseling. ;-)


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: JohnSprung] #2726780
04/05/18 03:14 PM
04/05/18 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnSprung
Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
We could start a new thread "Parents that exhaust our energy." smile

Frankly, that's where the real problem is.


What the world needs is an academic innovation: a dual major in piano pedagogy and marriage counseling. ;-)



I find the whole teachers' is forum exhausting this week.

If I were visiting here, thinking this is typical of what goes on here, I'd run away. This can't be a good atmosphere for students.

The majority of my students, you and old, are cooperating very well with what I ask them to do. The kind of problems were are writing about in this topic are rather rare for me and are not typical of my teaching.

I also seldom write about such problems, because if a student refuses to try what the teacher suggests, lessons can't work. It's as simple as that.

Last edited by Gary D.; 04/05/18 03:16 PM.

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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726793
04/05/18 03:42 PM
04/05/18 03:42 PM
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Gary, I always thought (maybe erroneously?) that forums were a safe place to share experiences with others who may or may not have experienced those things and hopefully the OP can learn from others' suggestions and experiences. If all we ever posted were success stories, I doubt that forums would hold as much interest and information exchange as they do here.

Some teachers have the luxury to let students go when they don't practice or follow suggestions, but most that I know do not have the luxury. Retention rates are important in music stores and local music schools as well. I'm sorry that\ you felt this topic was exhausting. The reality is if I could, I would let at least 4 students go, but I cannot.


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726796
04/05/18 03:47 PM
04/05/18 03:47 PM
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Zaphod, sorry, I had actually been replying to you, not "Adam." Thanks for your input.

I am frustrated with these types of students. Are there teachers here that are not frustrated with students like the subject of this thread? A student with almost 7 years of study who ignores everything I've tried to impart to him.

I never want to give up on a student, but I think after 10 years of music store students, it is starting to finally affect my tolerance level.


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: Adam.] #2726812
04/05/18 04:10 PM
04/05/18 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Adam.
This thread exhausted my energy. wink

You mentioned that you were driven to get "A"'s. It sounds like you're more of a perfectionist or purist than what this person is :-)

It also sounds like that may have carried through from you learning the piano, to the success you want to see in your teaching with your own students. (That's not necessarily a bad thing at all).

I'm suspicious that it may not be this student is sapping your energy - but that it may be the way you're responding to him that is, maybe partly due to your desire to see people be the best they can be. . That you mention that you feel like you've failed and not the student only adds to that impression. It sounds like you are quite hard on yourself and have high expectations. (Again not a bad thing, but be aware that it's ok to have exceptions).

I'm not suggesting that this student doesn't have areas to be addressed, or that there's not practical things you can do to put in place (I'm impressed with some of the responses that might work).

But what concerns me is that you seem to be at a point where this is really exhausting you - I think first you need to find away to address the effect it's having in your own life first before worrying about how else you may be able to help your student.

May be by giving yourself and him a break by ignoring those 'fault' areas for a while, and focusing on the areas that he's improving with more if you're able to. If not it might be by separating yourself from this student.

Your satisfaction with what you're doing is just as important as your students. I do hope you find a solution that works well for you, and I hope I haven't been too forward in my thoughts. I just thought it might be helpful to respond from a different angle.


Hi Adam, enjoyed your post. I am exhausted in general with these kinds of students, that, if I taught them privately, I would recommend they find another teacher. Many wonderful ideas have been suggested in this thread. smile

I think that the fault lies with me, in that I've ignored those "fault areas" and haven't consistently ensured that these basic concepts are observed.

Last edited by chasingrainbows; 04/05/18 04:13 PM.

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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726816
04/05/18 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by chasingrainbows

I am frustrated with these types of students. Are there teachers here that are not frustrated with students like the subject of this thread? A student with almost 7 years of study who ignores everything I've tried to impart to him.

I don't teach formally, but my job does involve educating people (adults more than kids), and with much greater things at stake (i.e. often life and death).

And I use every trick in the book (and out of the book, out of the box, and even extra-terrestrial....) to try to get some people to do what they need to do. With many, it's been over a decade of futility. Some people will never change, will never learn, until it's too late. With others, suddenly something twigs (usually because of a tragedy, unfortunately), and they see the light (as it were)......

But I never blame myself. I can only do my best. Human nature is what it is.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726852
04/05/18 08:34 PM
04/05/18 08:34 PM
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Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
He's playing Level 4-5 pieces AZN.

That's further than most kids ever get to.

You can relax and know that you've achieved more than what's feasible with this student. You should give him pieces that will make him sound bigger than he actually is.

I've made similar decisions for many kids who are much further along than your student. These students have maxed out. In lieu of musical depth, it's time for them to explore musical breadth. One kid has already passed level 10 (and not by the skin of his teeth, either) but he decided that classical music is not for him, so pop/jazz/contemporary music here we come!


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726855
04/05/18 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
[quote=Adam.]
I think that the fault lies with me, in that I've ignored those "fault areas" and haven't consistently ensured that these basic concepts are observed.


If you're drawing that conclusion now, then that's good. Some teachers never make such realisations. Probably a sign that you are indeed a competent teacher, willing to review and criticise your own methods as well as the students.

Make the tweak, increase your own value, it can only work out well for you.

Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726857
04/05/18 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by chasingrainbows


I am frustrated with these types of students. Are there teachers here that are not frustrated with students like the subject of this thread? A student with almost 7 years of study who ignores everything I've tried to impart to him.

I never want to give up on a student, but I think after 10 years of music store students, it is starting to finally affect my tolerance level.


It's important to listen to your feelings of frustration-- it's a sign that something is not going well (which is why you've asked the forum for ideas). It's normal to feel frustrated and want to solve the problem. I don't see an issue with sharing your problems with other teachers, even if it seems negative. Most of my students are doing fine, but it's sometimes the difficult ones who make me think.

At a workshop I attended, a clinician compared teaching piano lessons to being in a rowboat with the student-- if one party is not pulling their weight, then the other has to put in more energy to keep the boat moving. If the teacher doesn't prepare for lessons or develop their skills, the student will struggle. If the student doesn't practice or take suggestions, then the teacher works harder to motivate and push things along.

If I feel like my energy is being drained, I try to examine what's been going on in lessons, with the student's life, and also with myself-- am I too busy? is my schedule stacked with too many "challenging" personalities on certain days, is my personal life stressed, etc. I also ask myself whether my goals for the lesson are aligned with those of the students, and if our goals aren't the same, then what can be done? Usually there's some common ground between my ideal (helping the student become the best musician they can be) and what the student finds interesting (learning fast pieces to impress friends, playing the complete works of Justin Bieber, whatever.) I don't think it's giving up on a student to re-orient your goals to something less than perfection. One of my students has taken 5 years to get to level 2B-- she is a lovely human of normal intelligence but often does not follow instructions. I have kept from going completely insane by accepting this and celebrating her small victories along the way.
Working harder than the student is tiring; better to have a destination that you can agree on and row the boat together.


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Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726879
04/06/18 12:48 AM
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Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
Gary, I always thought (maybe erroneously?) that forums were a safe place to share experiences with others who may or may not have experienced those things and hopefully the OP can learn from others' suggestions and experiences. If all we ever posted were success stories, I doubt that forums would hold as much interest and information exchange as they do here.

I understand, but this is NOT a teachers' forum. I wish we had one. I really do. But we don't.

Instead it is "mixed group", where students are encouraged to participate, and such students may or may not have one minute of teaching experience. So if you or I post about problems we are having teaching, be prepared to get some pretty off-the-wall feedback.

Some of it will be excellent, but a lot of it is coming from people who haven't walked in our shoes.

I have held back making suggestions, analyses or giving opinions.

I have already said, clearly, that I have a few students who try my patience. It is true that I can cut them loose. You seem to be saying that you can't. But I assure you that I have bills to pay, so I put up with some situations that are far from ideal and hope that they will improve.

That said, I've never endured a situation that I don't think works for years.

For me everything that is really important happens in the first year, and the most important things happen in the first 6 months. If a good foundation has been laid down, if I'm getting cooperation, then things are going to work. I have said before that I am unusually careful about setting down exact instructions and being sure they are followed.

I don't bend, but I have to explain that this is IF students are playing at home. If I know that they ARE playing then I mostly consider it a flaw in my teaching if the playing is getting us nowhere. If there is time being put in, and I see continuing problems, I immediately start checking. What is really happening? Are my directions being followed? Are the students writing down times in which they do whatever they want, ignoring my lesson plans? Do parents report that there is a problem, meaning that they put down time that they are not doing? Are the students reading my directions? Are they trying to follow them?

I insist that a parent be present in lessons for small children. If they won't be present, I will only continue in the rather rare situations where the children work entirely on their own, with no supervision at all. This USUALLY means that a parent or parents want to drop kids off and want no other responsibility, and it just does not work.

As kids get older, or more advanced, this changes. Obviously there will come a time when children advance so far that the parents no longer have a clue about what we are doing, unless they are also musicians. At that point I'm fine with kids, of any age, coming by themselves to lesson - so long as I see progress continue.

But within reason I remain in charge. It can't work otherwise. My students are free to discuss fingering, interpretation, what they want to work on next. I'm open to any style of music, and to me becoming more advanced means that you have more choices. I have students bring in things I don't know, and sometimes things I don't really like much. But if they are good enough to play the music, I'm on board.

What I won't put up with is the kind of thick-headed stubbornness that you seem to be describing in this boy. I say what I want. I say how I expect to work. If I get no cooperation, I end the lessons.

This is important: IT ALMOST NEVER GETS TO THAT POINT, EVER.

I'm a man, I'm old, and I have a very strong personality. I have learned to use these things as advantages, because we can use gender, age and disposition as trump cards to intimidate and even bully. I don't believe in doing that. But I work from strength, and that's just who I am.

So I tell everyone, without exception: "If you screw things up, then I'm going to tell you how to fix them. I'll have answers. But if you don't listen to my answers, I'm the wrong teacher for you and you need to find someone else."

Then, when people show me cooperation, and when I see that they are making really good progress, I gradually let them play anything they want, with a huge amount of freedom.

I've never worked with a student for 6 or 7 years whom I did not like and with whom I have not felt comfortable. I've never made it past a couple years when things did not work, and usually things never lasted nearly that long.

That may make me seem like a dictator, a really unpleasant person, but one adult was with me for over two decades and would still be with me right now if she had not had to move several hundred miles away. We still talk on the phone weekly, and I am working with her on theory and analysis. She is 78.
Quote

Some teachers have the luxury to let students go when they don't practice or follow suggestions, but most that I know do not have the luxury. Retention rates are important in music stores and local music schools as well. I'm sorry that\ you felt this topic was exhausting. The reality is if I could, I would let at least 4 students go, but I cannot.

If you had let this one student go several years ago, would it really have changed your income or your relationship with the store?

If you were a bit more strict regarding people following your instructions, how do you know that you would not end up with more students, who played better? And a more secure relationship with your store?

How do you start small children? I'm assuming the boy you are talking about started quite young, and that an adult was not present in lessons to see what was really going on.

You say that parents just drop the kids off and take off. Well, parents TRY that with me too. The very first lesson I make clear to parents that I work with the parents too, and if there is no parent in the lesson, it may take five years to advance to where I get the average young student to in one year, when an adult is on board.

So I won't even start lessons without this agreement, and I can't remember more than a couple times over the last couple years where I have not gotten this agreement. It's the one "rule" I won't allow violated. There are, of course, emergencies when someone else brings the child. Those are not the usual thing. But if a parent goes back on our agreement, thinking he or she can just drop a small kid off and I'm magically going to make everything happen, we either get that straightened out or it's a deal breaker.

You could at least try to make that change for the parents who are open to having their kids progress much faster.

Last edited by Gary D.; 04/06/18 12:55 AM.

Piano Teacher
Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2726970
04/06/18 01:02 PM
04/06/18 01:02 PM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 7,904
Orange County, CA
AZNpiano Offline
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AZNpiano  Offline
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Posts: 7,904
Orange County, CA
Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
I am frustrated with these types of students. Are there teachers here that are not frustrated with students like the subject of this thread? A student with almost 7 years of study who ignores everything I've tried to impart to him.

This is called "expensive babysitting." Any typical piano teacher is going to have oodles of these students. I'd like to consider myself above average, but even I have to put up with these students. As long as all parties involved are content, I have no problem taking money from these people.

Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
I never want to give up on a student, but I think after 10 years of music store students, it is starting to finally affect my tolerance level.

"Give up" might be the wrong word. Change your mindset about the type of service you provide.

Let's say I have 20 students in my studio. I'm okay with 18 of them being absolutely horrid at piano, with zero interest. All I need are those 2 brilliant kids who can make my job worthwhile. And at the rate it's going right now, that's the type of studio I'm going to have in three years. Almost all the beginners I teach right now are uniformly hopeless.

Also, are you able to raise your rates at the piano store? A higher paycheck may reduce the pain of dealing with deadbeat students. I recently started raising my rates (not insignificantly) to a certain portion of my students, and I'm surprised that almost all of them stayed on.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: AZNpiano] #2726996
04/06/18 02:22 PM
04/06/18 02:22 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 4,987
*sigh* Salt Lake City
malkin Offline
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malkin  Offline
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Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 4,987
*sigh* Salt Lake City
Originally Posted by AZNpiano

"Give up" might be the wrong word. Change your mindset about the type of service you provide.


I'd call this adjusting your expectations.


Enough is as good as a feast.

Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2727008
04/06/18 02:51 PM
04/06/18 02:51 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 249
USA
A
Andamento Offline
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Andamento  Offline
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Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 249
USA
ChasingRainbows,

I've been thinking a lot this past week about your situation, and the various comments on this thread. (Lots of good thoughts expressed here.)

I have a few ideas for you, but may I ask you a few questions to make sure I understand first?

I'm not sure what you mean by this:

Quote
We also have the ability to drop a student, however, the store really watches retention rates, so I hesitate to drop the students that exhaust me, which, right now, would be 4 students.


Who is the "We" at the beginning of the quote? Do you mean the teachers at the store are allowed to drop students, rather than only the store owners/managers having the power to dismiss students?

Also, what do you mean by "the store really watches retention rates"? Have teachers been let go for losing or dismissing too many students? What does the store do when there are falling retention rates?

I have other questions, but will stop here for now. smile

Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: chasingrainbows] #2727015
04/06/18 03:01 PM
04/06/18 03:01 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 3,795
Florida
dogperson Offline
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dogperson  Offline
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Posts: 3,795
Florida
I don’t know if this helps, and maybe it falls under the definition of managing expectations:

My teacher’s philosophy is that she gives the best of herself to all of her students, and then she takes no credit for their successes or their failures. It’s managed to keep her sane through over 3000 students over five decades of teaching.

I don’t know how she got to this mindset, and I don’t know if I could


"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
" I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho
Re: Students that exhaust my energy [Re: Zaphod] #2727031
04/06/18 03:48 PM
04/06/18 03:48 PM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,916
USA
C
chasingrainbows Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
chasingrainbows  Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
C

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,916
USA
Originally Posted by Zaphod
Originally Posted by chasingrainbows
[quote=Adam.]
I think that the fault lies with me, in that I've ignored those "fault areas" and haven't consistently ensured that these basic concepts are observed.


If you're drawing that conclusion now, then that's good. Some teachers never make such realisations. Probably a sign that you are indeed a competent teacher, willing to review and criticise your own methods as well as the students.

Make the tweak, increase your own value, it can only work out well for you.


Full disclosure- when my child was going through the terrible 2's and 3's, etc., sometimes I would get so tired of saying no, or later on, grounding, that I would go into denial mode. Pretty much what I do with some students, since, as others have said, I try to focus on what they do well, and be positive, but the result is not ideal.


Piano teacher, BA Music, MTNA member
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