2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.9 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Petrof Pianos
Petrof Pianos
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Karsten Collection
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Who's Online Now
54 members (chateauferret, AlphaBravoCharlie, anotherscott, 1009Vic, Beowulf, bobsax, Boboulus, Amy H, 14 invisible), 462 guests, and 350 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Is it me?
#2717077 02/25/18 09:16 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
H
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
H
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
I’m trying (yet again) to find a piano teacher. I haven’t had much luck with piano teachers in the past (some of which is definitely not my fault), but at this point I have to genuinely consider the possibility that I'm just being too demanding or maybe expecting too much in general.


Here are the main 'problems' from my point of view (I've tried to keep my comments balanced but, obviously it's hard to do that completely)…


1. The first week, they started with a method book that I’ve already tried and know I don’t like, so I told them this…but the very first question they asked me in the second lesson was whether or not I’d bought the book yet. Why would I have bought the book that I told them I don’t like?

2. After telling them that I hadn’t bought it and reminding them that I’d said in the first week that I didn’t like the book, I also told them I don’t want to use method books (I’ve already been through 2 of them on my own and I don’t like the restrictions). They immediately brought out 3 more different method books and tried to get me to pick one of them.

3. I had to repeatedly ask them to stop telling me the next notes while I was playing. I’d ask them not to tell me the notes and they’d stop for a little while, but then start up again a few notes later (I found it extremely off-putting trying to play from a score I'd never seen before with the teachers' voice constantly in my ear telling me which note was next).

4. I asked about doing the grade 1 exam (abrsm) and they brought out their copy of the exam book which had all the names written in under the notes! (I was surprised at this, but didn’t mention it in the lesson as I felt like I was already being difficult enough but, surely, even at grade 1 the note names shouldn’t be written in like that?)

5. I told them that I'd been teaching myself things like scales and demonstrated some of them (two octaves, hands together, and contrary) but, when I mentioned that I wanted to do exams (starting with G1) they seemed to have completely forgotten this and told me that I would have to learn (?) the scales I'd already shown them that I know? I showed them the scales again and got an 'oh, right you already know those' sort of response.


Another point (which is more of a difference in preferences than a real problem) is that this teacher is more into jazz and learning by ear, while I prefer mostly classical and want to learn theory.

Also, so far I've been given no homework, but it's still early days so maybe that's to be expected and my desire not to use method books may have thrown the teacher's plans off here (along with the fact that I already know basic music theory, note names, scales etc.).


_________________________________________________


I practise every day and take my piano time seriously, but lessons are a huge expense for me and I can't justify them if I don't enjoy them. The teacher kept looking at the clock throughout the lesson but I can't blame them for that as I was doing the same thing. It felt as though we were both counting down the seconds to when the lesson ended and we could both escape. frown

My general feeling right now is that this teacher is not a good fit for me, my goals or my learning style.

I'm looking for honest answers here. What do you think? Am I being unreasonable/unrealistic in my expectations?


(Learning piano 'on and off' since 2009/2010)
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717082 02/25/18 09:38 AM
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 2,466
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 2,466
From how you describe it (and I have to take your word for it wink) this teacher is indeed not a good fit for you. You seem to be just an item on the todo list for him, not an individual, with individual needs and goals.

But even if everything were perfect in that regard, the fact alone that the teacher is a jazz/play-by-ear teacher, but you want a classical training, is reason enough to look for a different teacher, imo.

Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717088 02/25/18 09:59 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 6,064
Silver Subscriber
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
Silver Subscriber
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 6,064
I would suggest Spending more upfront time with any potential teacher: You should be able to tell them what you want to learn, ask them what they traditionally teach and how they teach it. Any teacher who teaches predominately jazz and play by ear is not a good fit but you can find out even before you even take a lesson.

Since this is, I think, your third teacher, I think you need a little little more flexibility in how you are taught, I don’t think anyone actually loves the music in method books, but they do help you develop skills in a progressive way. I would let any potential teacher know that you do not care for the music and ask if they can supplement or replace the music in the method book with other music that will teach you the same skills. The goal is to learn the skills that you need so that you can play the music that you love. You may not love all the music you are asked to learn, But learn to view it as a steppingstone, not a final goal,

Last edited by dogperson; 02/25/18 10:10 AM.

"Music, rich, full of feeling, not soulless, is like a crystal on which the sun falls and brings forth from it a whole rainbow" - F. Chopin
"I never dreamt with my own two hands I could touch the sky" - Sappho

It's ok to be a Work In Progress
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717091 02/25/18 10:13 AM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,092
R
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
R
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,092
It's not just you.
It's happened to me also with teachers on three occasions (not piano, though...it was guitar, and voice).
I sensed right away that it was not what I was looking for (The encounters triggered no inspiration in me), and never went back to the guitar teacher. The voice was slightly better, but not enough, so went only 3 or 4 times.
There was not enough engagement and demonstrable skill from the teacher in each case.
One other problem can be that e.g. a so called "piano teacher" does not have the actual training in being a teacher. Only the skill level of being a concert pianist e.g., is not enough to be a teacher.
Today (while being more self-secure than in the past), I would never sign up for any kind of lessons without having met the teacher and having had a trial lesson.


Czerny's Piano School Vol. 1, now at #77 and giving it a break.
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717101 02/25/18 11:04 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
H
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
H
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
Originally Posted by dogperson
Since this is, I think, your third teacher,


This is my fourth teacher, but the first one I had was amazing. They listened to me and worked with me to achieve my goals. They always set homework and expected it to be done (and were also willing to set me more work, once they were satisfied that I was doing what they asked). They never skipped theory because 'adult learners don't need to know it' as one of my later teachers (not my current one) tried to do. The only reason I stopped with this teacher was because my commitments changed and I could no longer attend lessons on the days/times that they taught. frown There's a very real possibility that, if I'd been able to stay with that teacher, I would have stuck with piano much longer back then instead of having so many 'breaks' over the years.

Originally Posted by dogperson
I think you need a little little more flexibility in how you are taught, I don’t think anyone actually loves the music in method books, but they do help you develop skills in a progressive way. I would let any potential teacher know that you do not care for the music and ask if they can supplement or replace the music in the method book with other music that will teach you the same skills. The goal is to learn the skills that you need so that you can play the music that you love. You may not love all the music you are asked to learn, But learn to view it as a steppingstone, not a final goal,


I'm not completely against using method books, but I'd like to move away from them now.

I worked through Alfred's Book 1 on my own and the way that I got through it when I there were pieces that I didn't enjoy was to find other music that I wanted to learn and do it alongside the method book pieces. I understand that the progression in these books helps to build the skills that I'll need for the pieces that I want to play later and I never once skipped a piece because I thought it was boring.

I have book 2 of the Alfred's series, so maybe I could take that in and see if they'd be willing to work with it instead? (Alfred's was not one of the options they offered me from their collection).



Originally Posted by JoBert
But even if everything were perfect in that regard, the fact alone that the teacher is a jazz/play-by-ear teacher, but you want a classical training, is reason enough to look for a different teacher, imo.

True. I like jazz, but it's just not the main direction that I want to go in with piano. I much prefer the classical approach to learning.


Last edited by Haunted Keys; 02/25/18 11:07 AM.

(Learning piano 'on and off' since 2009/2010)
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717103 02/25/18 11:10 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,787
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,787
It seems like you know exactly what you want. Why not write down exactly what you are looking for in a teacher and in the whole experience and send that document out to prospective teachers?


Learner
Re: Is it me?
malkin #2717104 02/25/18 11:15 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,858
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,858
Originally Posted by malkin
It seems like you know exactly what you want. Why not write down exactly what you are looking for in a teacher and in the whole experience and send that document out to prospective teachers?

Fourwords:

Know how to teach.

Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717105 02/25/18 11:16 AM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 13,237
B
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 13,237
Originally Posted by Haunted Keys
I like jazz, but it's just not the main direction that I want to go in with piano. I much prefer the classical approach to learning.


I'm puzzled.

Why would you choose a jazz teacher who prefers you to learn by ear if you want to go the classical route and ABRSM exams?

The UK is not lacking in traditional piano teachers who follow the ABRSM syllabus, rather than something of their own devising.


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Is it me?
bennevis #2717106 02/25/18 11:22 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
H
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
H
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
Originally Posted by bennevis
[I'm puzzled.

Why would you choose a jazz teacher who prefers you to learn by ear if you want to go the classical route and ABRSM exams?

The UK is not lacking in traditional piano teachers who follow the ABRSM syllabus, rather than something of their own devising.


I went to a music school this time and this is the teacher they assigned me. I told them that I wanted to learn classical music and do abrsm exams and they said that this teacher would be able to do that. I'm thinking about asking to try a different teacher there.


(Learning piano 'on and off' since 2009/2010)
Re: Is it me?
keystring #2717108 02/25/18 11:30 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,787
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,787
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by malkin
It seems like you know exactly what you want. Why not write down exactly what you are looking for in a teacher and in the whole experience and send that document out to prospective teachers?

Fourwords:

Know how to teach.


That's not exactly what I heard from the OP.

I heard:
Learn from traditional repertoire rather than method books.
Use Alfred 2 if we must use a method book.
Advance my knowledge of music theory and technique.
Prepare for Grade 1 exam.
Goal: Take Grade 1 exam by (whatever date)


Learner
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717110 02/25/18 11:39 AM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 620
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 620
@Haunted Keys I see you are (like me) in the UK. Last September I was looking for a teacher and at the time didn't know quite how to about finding what I needed. In the end I went here https://www.firsttutors.com/uk/music/ You have to pay a small amount for the introduction (only after an exchange of messages to see if you both are a good fit for each other) but from the profiles I found two that looked like it would work well for me. I sent out an initial request and had a response from my favoured one first - so after a few more back and forth to check fit I agreed to pay the introduction fee (I can't remember the exact amount but I think it was £8 +- a pound or so either way - small compared to even one lesson cost) and we were introduced.

One of the reasons I choose her from the list that I had was the she had a diploma in how to teach music - classical to grade 8, but in her past had played jazz piano in a band. More importantly her profile said she tailored her approach to the individual.

I have to say, I couldn't be happier with the result. She started by trying to understand my objectives - I want to play music for myself to feel the emotion in it from my own playing, and I want to inspire others, particularly my young grandsons to learn music too. I am not particularly interested in exams or grades, just to building up a repertoire of nice music to play.

So far we haven't gone near a method book (although I already had grade 3 passed from 56 years earlier), I have chosen pieces I wanted to play and she has helped me achieve the best result possible. She is not letting me get away with mediocre either - but where I have struggled she has shown me how to get past my blockage. Homework is about taking the identified problems in one lesson so they are fixed by the next lesson.

She hasn't heard me play scales, although in the a few lessons ago I asked for a quick show of how to play arpeggios and last week we did have a brief discussion on how to play Bb, Eb and Ab arpeggios. Although there hasn't been anything formal - I already feel I am way beyond grade 3

Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717118 02/25/18 11:53 AM
Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 293
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 293
Go to your local opera group or a theatre group that performs musicals and talk to the piano accompanist. He/she will often teach (and very well), or be able to recommend other independent teachers that are likely hidden gems. Or find someone to teach you through skype. Skype's not brilliant but this way you can really tailor your choice of teacher and not be limited to someone local. I have found two really excellent teachers who help me greatly through skype.

I actually have 3 teachers (one local) who I take lessons/mentoring from occasionally. I spend about a month to two months working through things on my own and then get their feedback. They all know that I have more than one teacher, and are fine with that, and hearing advice on a piece from three different points of view is wonderfully helpful and enlightening.

With method books, I don't use them any more myself, but have come to appreciate the better ones. John Thompson, from the distant past, is really good and prepares you for exams and classical (for want of a better word) repertoire much better than Alfred's or Piano Adventures. And Thompson is full of good, vital bits of of information.

Methods books are very useful to make sure you don't miss steps along the way to your piano goal, but they definitely should be added to with all kinds of supplemental literature.

I find the Magrath books a great addition to using method books. They are like a slightly easier set of exam pieces and introduce you a wide variety of composers and music.

And then ABRSM and Trinity College exam repertoire books are great just for the fun of it even if you're not going to take the exams.


"Genius is not the sign of demigodliness, but the sign of having a profoundly practical mind" - anonymous

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTc4esj9xQG6NjLIr9an29Q
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717142 02/25/18 12:52 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,108
D
dmd Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,108
Originally Posted by Haunted Keys
I’m trying (yet again) to find a piano teacher.


I looked at the Youtube videos of your playing Minuet in G.

If I were you I would contact a teacher .... ask them to view that same video .... and then tell them that you would like them to help you correct every issue they view on that video.

Trust me .... they will know exactly what to do.

Now ... it is up to you whether you will listen to them or not.

If you do, you will begin to feel better about your playing.

Good Luck to you


Don

Kawai MP11SE, Focal Professional CMS 40 near-field monitors, Yamaha HS8S Powered Subwoofer, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs (Seldom Used)
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717160 02/25/18 01:48 PM
Joined: Oct 2016
Posts: 115
W
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
W
Joined: Oct 2016
Posts: 115
I’ve spent the first 18 months using method books but I’m starting to vere away from them now- luckily I have a teacher who seems flexible in his teaching methods and we both like a lot of the same music- so it’s a good teacher/ pupil relationship

Re: Is it me?
malkin #2717186 02/25/18 02:55 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,858
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,858
Originally Posted by malkin
Originally Posted by keystring
Originally Posted by malkin
It seems like you know exactly what you want. Why not write down exactly what you are looking for in a teacher and in the whole experience and send that document out to prospective teachers?

Fourwords:

Know how to teach.


That's not exactly what I heard from the OP.

I heard:
Learn from traditional repertoire rather than method books.
Use Alfred 2 if we must use a method book.
Advance my knowledge of music theory and technique.
Prepare for Grade 1 exam.
Goal: Take Grade 1 exam by (whatever date)

Here is what I was going by:

- keeps telling student what the next note is when student is playing new music
- writes notes into music, and even does so for exam music
- gives no assignments (what to practice once you're home)

If this is a by-ear teacher who is trying to teach "traditional" (reading from notation), maybe they don't know how to do that. It is the first two things that made me uneasy, but in fact so did the third.

I don't agree as much with the OP about the method book choice, because what a good teacher can do with a given book may be very different from what you yourself can draw out of it. Meanwhile, if a student who is playing brand new music pauses in a way that prompts the teacher to say what the next note is, then there may be reading problems. Then the task would be to guide the student toward improving their reading abilities. Just saying what the next note is, would not be teaching them how to read. Not assigning any homework to do between lessons also does not help the student to learn.

This is where I was coming from.

Re: Is it me?
keystring #2717193 02/25/18 03:39 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,787
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,787
Originally Posted by keystring

Fourwords:

Know how to teach.


Originally Posted by keystring
Here is what I was going by:

- keeps telling student what the next note is when student is playing new music
- writes notes into music, and even does so for exam music
- gives no assignments (what to practice once you're home)

If this is a by-ear teacher who is trying to teach "traditional" (reading from notation), maybe they don't know how to do that. It is the first two things that made me uneasy, but in fact so did the third.

This is where I was coming from.


Agree completely. I was thinking that dumping a teacher who is saying and writing note names and not giving assignments would be a given, and that the OP would be looking for a new teacher.


Learner
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717219 02/25/18 06:04 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 1,401
R
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
R
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 1,401
My first, and continuing impression is that this "school" has a one-size-fits-all mentality, and, you are being stuffed like a piece of upholstery to supply the shape and form that they like best. They do not listen to you.

Although many here have suggested talking to them, it seems you have already made clear your desires, but, they are not listening. In my book, that makes them inapproachable. Their demonstrated disregard for your desires leaves no reason to suspect that they will suddenly change skins and become good listeners or attentive, student centered teachers.

Incompetence is everywhere, and, the "school" facade doesn't mean anything in that regard.

I'd get out of there ASAP.

Last edited by Ralphiano; 02/25/18 06:08 PM.

Ralph

Kawai VPC1
Garritan CFX Lite
Pianist since April, 2015
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717228 02/25/18 07:15 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,685
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,685
Speaking as a pedagogy student (in my 4th and last semester of pedagogy classes), its going to be hard to find a teacher that doesn't want to use a method book, especially at level 1 or 2 . At lot of work has gone into designing those method books to guide the student through the progressive steps of learning all the skills needed in a logical order. To ask a teacher to come up with something new just for you would be a lot of work for the teacher, and suppose you don't like what they came up with?

If you don't like Alfred, there is Faber or Bastien. I like Faber, they have a lot of supplemental books at each level with a wide variety of pieces to chose from. Even the easiest pieces sound good.

And another thought - if a student came to me and said they went through Alfred level 1 on their own, then I would need them to demonstrate that to me...

Sam

Re: Is it me?
Sam S #2717311 02/26/18 08:57 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55
H
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
H
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 55

Originally Posted by Sam S
If you don't like Alfred, there is Faber or Bastien. I like Faber, they have a lot of supplemental books at each level with a wide variety of pieces to chose from. Even the easiest pieces sound good.

Sam


I think you misread my post. I actually don't mind the Alfred's course (which is why I bought the second book to continue with it), in fact I'd much prefer to use that (even if they wanted me to review book 1 first) than the ones my teacher showed me. There were parts of the first Alfred book that I didn't enjoy, but I found other things to do alongside them which kept me going. smile

Originally Posted by Sam S
And another thought - if a student came to me and said they went through Alfred level 1 on their own, then I would need them to demonstrate that to me...

Sam


That makes sense to me. I wouldn't expect a teacher (especially one I haven't been with for long) to just accept me at my word and I'd certainly have no problem if my teacher wanted me to demonstrate something for them. If I have made mistakes going through the book on my own then I'd rather they were caught earlier rather than later. The thing is, my teacher didn't even ask me about anything I'd done before, and seemed a little taken aback when I suggested that I play something to show them what I'd been working on.

Originally Posted by dmd
Originally Posted by Haunted Keys
I’m trying (yet again) to find a piano teacher.


I looked at the Youtube videos of your playing Minuet in G.

If I were you I would contact a teacher .... ask them to view that same video .... and then tell them that you would like them to help you correct every issue they view on that video.

Trust me .... they will know exactly what to do.

Now ... it is up to you whether you will listen to them or not.

If you do, you will begin to feel better about your playing.

Good Luck to you

That's a good suggestion, thank you. smile I think I'll do that but, maybe, I'll record a newer video of me playing that piece first instead of using the one Youtube (that was done 6 months ago and I've been working on it more since then). I still have a lot of problems to fix now, but it's better than it was (and I'm still working on getting comfortable using a metronome. lol).


(Learning piano 'on and off' since 2009/2010)
Re: Is it me?
Haunted Keys #2717329 02/26/18 11:03 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,108
D
dmd Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
D
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,108
Originally Posted by Haunted Keys
That's a good suggestion, thank you. smile I think I'll do that but, maybe, I'll record a newer video of me playing that piece first instead of using the one Youtube (that was done 6 months ago and I've been working on it more since then). I still have a lot of problems to fix now, but it's better than it was (and I'm still working on getting comfortable using a metronome. lol).




Good.

Another idea would be to suggest that you and your new teacher work on all those pieces you have on youtube (that you can already play) and work each of those to a high level by improving technique. That way you will be comfortable with the piece and the teacher can just work on technique.

That is often how I approach lessons. I work in the jazz realm.

When I begin a set lessons, I usually already know the melody and chord progression of a jazz piece and we just work on getting it to a "performance" level.

That would allow you to avoid the "method book" while still giving the teacher an idea of what to work on.

Just an idea.


Don

Kawai MP11SE, Focal Professional CMS 40 near-field monitors, Yamaha HS8S Powered Subwoofer, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs (Seldom Used)
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Hand Sanitizer for Musicians
Hand Sanitizer for Musicians
Musician's Hand Sanitizer available in our online store (and our Maple Street Music shop in Cornish Maine). Antibacterial, 62% ethyl alcohol. Hand Sanitizer for Musicians
Tons more music related products in our online store!
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Where Did The Buttons Go?!
----------------------
Our April 2020 Newsletter Available Online Now...
The Piano World During the Pandemic!
----------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Must one test a new Steinway before buying?
by Light124 - 06/03/20 08:39 AM
Digital Piano with even gaps between keys
by WhiteBlank125 - 06/03/20 08:15 AM
Italian Opera - Don Giovanni
by sinophilia - 06/03/20 07:41 AM
Ivory key tops
by Dr Adam - 06/03/20 07:05 AM
sight reading question
by Colette2 - 06/03/20 06:23 AM
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics199,372
Posts2,965,439
Members97,289
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4