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Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? #2645118
05/19/17 11:12 AM
05/19/17 11:12 AM
Joined: Jan 2015
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Groove On Offline OP
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Groove On  Offline OP
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wink Why do we still use Greek names for the modes ... in addition to other musical terms that have better modern equivalents?


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Re: Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? [Re: Groove On] #2661015
07/13/17 06:24 AM
07/13/17 06:24 AM
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rXd Offline
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Habit.

Americans, quite rationally talk about half notes and eighth notes etc. while we brits still use and teach semibreve, crotchets and hemidemisemiquavers, etc. The American system is now international among professionals, provided you know that a whole note is only half a breve.

"Man with big white teeth you hittiminmouth he scream". Easier to say piano but not as much fun. How rational you want to be?

We had someone in the technicians forum tried to 'rationalise' our points of reference. ....Caused endless confusion and emotionally charged resistance. Don't hear from him much anymore and all his terminology immediately fell into disuse.

You're welcome to try and change anything you like.

I'm intrigued, though. What would your better modern equivalent for, say "mixolydian" , for example, be?

Last edited by rXd; 07/13/17 08:26 AM. Reason: Additional question

Amanda Reckonwith
Concert & Recording tuner-tech, London, England.
"in theory, practice and theory are the same thing. In practice, they're not." - Lawrence P. 'Yogi' Berra.


Re: Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? [Re: Groove On] #2661740
07/15/17 11:12 PM
07/15/17 11:12 PM
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Adelaide, South Australia
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CharlesXX Offline
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Because that's what they are called. Why change?

What other modern equivalents for musical terms did you have in mind?

Same for plants and their Latin names. If I say "oak tree with kinda light looking leaves." That could be anything. If I say Quercus robur 'Concordia', it can be only one thing. And it doesn't matter where you come from or what language you speak. Same for musical terms.

Re: Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? [Re: CharlesXX] #2661756
07/16/17 01:36 AM
07/16/17 01:36 AM
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Groove On Offline OP
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Originally Posted by CharlesXX
What other modern equivalents for musical terms did you have in mind?

For example, why not just say 5th mode or degree of C major? It's simpler and more practical.


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Re: Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? [Re: Groove On] #2661766
07/16/17 02:55 AM
07/16/17 02:55 AM
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Adelaide, South Australia
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CharlesXX Offline
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Originally Posted by Groove On
Originally Posted by CharlesXX
What other modern equivalents for musical terms did you have in mind?

For example, why not just say 5th mode or degree of C major? It's simpler and more practical.



Well, the word "mode" has another meaning in music. A special kind of scale, as in Dorian Mode for example. Might be confusing.

In saying "5th degree of C major", you mean the note G? Why not just say "G"?

But this note in a harmonic context is called the dominant. So if the note G, or the chord of G, is described as the dominant, we know it's the 5th of C. The sub-dominant would be F, and so on.

We also have dominant chords, like the dominant 7th, or V7. Bit hard to say "5th degree of the scale of C major, 7th".

I can't really see the problem. All fields, like computing, maths, art and so on, have their special words which refer to specific things. Musicians learn about these things and understand them. This allows us to communicate our ideas effectively and without confusion.

Re: Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? [Re: CharlesXX] #2661856
07/16/17 01:32 PM
07/16/17 01:32 PM
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Groove On Offline OP
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Groove On  Offline OP
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Originally Posted by CharlesXX
In saying "5th degree of C major", you mean the note G? Why not just say "G"? ... But this note in a harmonic context is called the dominant. So if the note G, or the chord of G, is described as the dominant, we know it's the 5th of C. The sub-dominant would be F, and so on. ... We also have dominant chords, like the dominant 7th, or V7. Bit hard to say "5th degree of the scale of C major, 7th". ... I can't really see the problem. All fields, like computing, maths, art and so on, have their special words which refer to specific things. Musicians learn about these things and understand them. This allows us to communicate our ideas effectively and without confusion.




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And we are the dreamers of dreams.
Re: Why do we still use Greek names for the modes? [Re: Groove On] #2664256
07/27/17 03:26 AM
07/27/17 03:26 AM
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