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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636480 04/26/17 09:20 AM
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Hi Tony

Can you maybe be a little more specific and compare this approach to say Sudnow's? I personally didn't like Sudnow's method. His "method" just sounded too generic to me and didn't flow as much as I wanted, not as much movement as I wanted.

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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636514 04/26/17 10:33 AM
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What I really liked most about Sudnow is that he spent a lot of time talking about the process of learning. I quote him all the time, and learned a lot about how to learn on my own, how to set expectations, etc.

I liked that he made order out of chaos and even learned some tunes through his method. His voicing rules make a lot of sense. The thing I didn't like is that strict block chord style. I still go back to his method from time to time just to get grounded again.

To me, the perfect self study approach would be to combine David Higginson's course with the Sudnow method. If a person worked through what Higginson teaches with regard to actually playing (after listening to Sudnow's lecture on self-teaching), and then went on to Sudnow's voicing rules, you would have the best of both worlds.

David Higginson (DH) does give you a sense of what to expect and how to approach learning his method, so I don't want to say he skipped that. However, there is a lot of study that Sudnow put into the way adults learn that I think we can all benefit from.

DH teaches a means of two-handed voicing using some basic chord forms that he calls "chord patterns", and then all the rest of the chords are obtained by modifying these basic forms.

Sudnow teaches a set of rules for voicing chords, and then you use these to build a chord under each melody note, so there is no basic form or system beyond the rules.

DH applies what he calls "rhythm patterns" (arpeggios and that sort of thing - movement, flow) to his chords to make the chording come alive. With this approach, you are dealing with fingering. This works fine for accompaniment, which is the main part of the course. However, when it comes to playing solos, you have to REALLY watch his fingers to learn how to handle modifying the chord forms on the fly to accommodate the changing melody, while keeping the rhythm patterns flowing.

Sudnow avoids all the fingering issues by using block chords, going from one to another. You form a chord, pick up your hands and put them on the next chord. You play in time, but do so only by going from one block chord to another. Later, on he does give you some basic stride styling, but this is not covered in as much detail as the main course, just as DH does not cover playing solo in as much detail as the accompaniments in the main course.

Sudnow is all about playing solo piano, arranging from a lead sheet.

DH is all about playing accompaniment and also fro a lead sheet, with solo piano being taught to a lesser degree. The information is all there, but you REALLY have to watch those videos again and again and figure out what he is doing.

I have just completed "Silent Night" as a solo and I have learned quite a bit about how DH modifies the chord pattern to fit the melody on top. It is learn by doing, and it does work.

As for the Sudnow method, I know of only two people who have really gone through the course and stuck with it long enough to really build repertoire and move beyond the block chording style. One person called herself Swingin' Barb, and used to post in these forums some time ago. The other is David Haines, who calls himself Markham and has posted here occasionally when the Sudnow method is discussed. He currently maintains the Sudnow method site.

I don't know of anyone who has completed the DH course. DMD, who posts frequently here is the person who initially posted about it recently, so I assume he has worked in the course, but I don't know if he went all the way through all the tunes or not.

My suspicion is that most of us never complete any of these courses, but maybe learn a bit from each and very eventually might learn to play some stuff.

To me, the DH course is the one I am most likely to finish because he makes it fun all along the way. Results come fairly easily, and I believe that by doing a few more solos, I will be able to figure out more tunes on my own.

From there, I have a couple of follow-on things to work on. One is the Australian improv course called Quaverbox. Another is the Willie Myette piano materials. My main issue has been fingering. By working with the DH course, I am becoming much more comfortable with this. Since that has been my sticking point, I think that there is a lot I can tackle after the DH course with confidence.

Tony

Last edited by TonyB; 04/26/17 10:34 AM.

Roland V-Grand
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636515 04/26/17 10:35 AM
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Frosty, did you receice the course yet?

Tony, have you reached out to Creative music to check the status of your chord supplement?

Also, can you comment on another post that this course is rather basic? How advanced does he get in a 9 hr course?

Is there any discussion of piano solo with the right hand playing the entire melody?

Last edited by Grandman; 04/26/17 10:36 AM.

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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
Grandman #2636520 04/26/17 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Grandman
Frosty, did you receice the course yet?

Tony, have you reached out to Creative music to check the status of your chord supplement?

Also, can you comment on another post that this course is rather basic? How advanced does he get given it to is a 9 hr course?

Is there any discussion of piano solo with the right hand playing the entire melody?


No, I have not checked with Creative Music about the chord supplement. I think I am probably less concerned about it than you are. smile

The course probably is rather basic. It certainly has to focus on one area for the amount of teaching provided. It isn't a replacement for the Duane Shinn 52 week course.

It really depends on what you goals are and what you consider/define as "basic". For me, this course is teaching me to play a solo with a flowing style, from a lead sheet. I already know music theory and can figure out what I need once I have the skills the course teaches.

I think the problem here is that you really will have to try it for yourself to get the answers you are looking for because we each will view the course differently, depending on what experience we have going into it, and what our respective musical goals are.

For me, I wanted to get a sense for how fingering works on the piano when playing the kinds of music I like and in the styles I want to play. I wanted to get a sense for how to make the chords needed to play these styles, and how to make it flow. This course gives me that.

There isn't really "discussion" about playing solo. DH takes several tunes in the songbook and plays them as solos, talking you through what he is doing as he does it. You are essentially looking over his shoulder as he does this. Therefore, it is up to you to watch again and again and again until you get all the fingering and understand what he is telling you. He does go measure by measure, but rather quickly.

DH tells you that there are songs that won't work well as solos with this method of playing. He gives you examples of this and explains why. This should help you select appropriate tunes. In my opinion, it is possible to play these tunes that he says won't work, because I have CDs of solo pianist doing just that. However, it takes a more advanced technique to do so. I believe that I can figure that out after completing this course because once pointed in the right direction, I typically can figure out the rest on my own.

It takes time and effort on your part to really get everything in those lessons. It depends on how motivated you are, whether or not you are willing to put in that effort. Since this is something I really want to learn, I am putting in that effort and am getting the results I hoped for.

Tony


Last edited by TonyB; 04/26/17 10:49 AM.

Roland V-Grand
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
Grandman #2636538 04/26/17 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Grandman
Frosty, did you receice the course yet?

Tony, have you reached out to Creative music to check the status of your chord supplement?

Also, can you comment on another post that this course is rather basic? How advanced does he get in a 9 hr course?

Is there any discussion of piano solo with the right hand playing the entire melody?


Well, you got my curiosity up on this, so I called the number on the course box and talked directly to David Jr (DH's son). He said the supplement just came in and he is shipping it. I should get it by the end of this week or early next week. He did not charge me any extra shipping.

David is VERY enthusiastic about this course and we talked for a bit. I told him that my focus is really on the solo piano portion of the course. He told me I would be rather surprised at how many situations I would find myself in doing accompaniment. On thinking about it, that does make sense. If I were to play in a retirement home, for example, I am sure the people attending would want sing-alongs. If I were to play in a church, people would want accompaniment for their songs. If I were to accompany a singer, obviously I would be playing accompaniment. If I were to play in a band or other ensemble setting, I would be playing accompaniment.

So, really, it does make sense to cover BOTH aspects of playing. As I think I said in a previous post, once you get the hang of the mechanics of sticking the melody on top, you can apply it to other tunes. so I think the coverage in this course is just fine, especially with the additional material about chord and rhythm patterns in the supplement providing that much more vocabulary to work with.

I can safely say that the program is in good hands. David has some projects going that should be interesting. He has no plans to change the course or its supplements, but instead to provide further online support in the form of videos showing how to handle songs that people have requested. In other words, the course support is very much alive and there is a real person at the other end of the phone or email.

A word about the supplements. Though I have not yet seen the chord supplement, I have no reason to believe it is any different in this regard than the rhythm supplement (other than that there is no CD for the chord supplement, because there is no reason to have one).

The supplements provide the information in a very abbreviated form. The reason is that you already know what to do with this abbreviated information. There is enough to get what you need to play the thing, but there is no need to go over what was taught in the main course. So, these supplements can pack a lot of information into a compact book, and all the rhythm patterns are played on the CD.

For me, I like to have everything that one can get for the course, so it seemed the natural thing to do, purchasing the supplements. They are very inexpensive and they do greatly enhance the course by really expanding your chord and rhythm pattern vocabulary.

Tony



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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636547 04/26/17 11:47 AM
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Hello. My set finally arrived on Monday. I didn't get a chance to open it until yesterday. There are a ton of materials so I could only tell you what I've seen so far.

My initial reaction was not a good one. The lesson book seemed to be just a bunch of cheat sheets and piano chord fingering charts. The sections that did talk about topics were only two or three pages long and the last 15 Pages Were Chord diagrams.

I listened to the CD and was initially also underwhelmed. The first three songs use exactly the same chord pattern, just with different chords. I thought the piano parts were drowned out by the singing and other instruments.

OK, so that was only my initial reaction. Later on yesterday I went to look at the DVDs. I see that although the lesson book tends to be cheat sheets, that is all that is really necessary. His description of what is on the page is a very thorough on the DVD. He does take you step-by-step and it is logical, clear and efficient. I watch the first five lessons which were basically an introduction and how to play the first song, silent night.

I then skipped to the melody section, and Tony B's description is spot on. It goes fast, but it is all there, note for note, measure by measure, and it makes absolute sense.

I like the pacing of the book. My prior complaint of the first three songs using the exact pattern does not seem so bad as each song was teaching you with different chords, and it is necessary to learn a few chords at a time in order to not get overwhelmed. He also includes some variations so that it is not so repetitive, so for example two of the 16 or so measures will be a different pattern to keep it from getting boring.

I also like how he presents the material. He does not talk down to you, and he does not sound like a salesman. He makes it clear that everything is going to take practice in that with each repetition things get easier. I like this approach because so many other courses promise to have you sounding like a pro in two weeks. Almost every product out there is gimmicky.

I like that there are different lessons. While I guess it could never substitute a live teacher, it seems to be the next best thing. I can watch a lesson and work on it until I master it then I could go to the next video. I need that structure. In other courses or books I am so tempted to jump to the next section. This message give me a better sense of discipline.

I think the CD is a handy companion, but as it is only 20 or so minutes long, I really wish they would have just repeated the songs as piano only, and then repeated them again as chords and Melody.

So overall I am going to say, so far so good. I am glad that my initial reaction appears to be wrong, and I look forward to diving into this course slowly and steadily. I will keep this thread updated as I go.

Last edited by FrostyKeys; 04/26/17 11:52 AM.
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636559 04/26/17 12:41 PM
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Thanks FrostyKeys. I am glad that you presented your initial impressions and the your later impressions because I am fairly sure that you won't be the only with that initial reaction. For folks reading your post, they will not be too influenced by their same impression before giving the course a chance. That is a valuable contribution to the thread!

It will be interesting to have a couple of us working through this course in this thread and providing our comments as we go.

I am still baffled that this course's site did not either show up did but did not attract my attention when I was looking around for something like this. So, for others, this thread can serve as a sort of beacon to help others find out about it, as DMD's posts clued me in.

Tony



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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
TonyB #2636652 04/26/17 04:44 PM
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Quote
[/quote]There isn't really "discussion" about playing solo. DH takes several tunes in the songbook and plays them as solos, talking you through what he is doing as he does it. You are essentially looking over his shoulder as he does this. Therefore, it is up to you to watch again and again and again until you get all the fingering and understand what he is telling you. He does go measure by measure, but rather quickly.[quote]



Thanks much. Of course everyone will have their own opinion and the only way to truly know is to try. But that's what these discussions are for. Well, it looks as if this course is really geared towards accompaniment, although it includes a portion demonstrating solo piano. I find this very helpful, thanks.

Last edited by Grandman; 04/26/17 05:31 PM.

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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636663 04/26/17 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by FrostyKeys
Hello. My set finally arrived on Monday. I didn't get a chance to open it until yesterday. There are a ton of materials so I could only tell you what I've seen so far.

My initial reaction was not a good one. The lesson book seemed to be just a bunch of cheat sheets and piano chord fingering charts. The sections that did talk about topics were only two or three pages long and the last 15 Pages Were Chord diagrams.

I listened to the CD and was initially also underwhelmed. The first three songs use exactly the same chord pattern, just with different chords. I thought the piano parts were drowned out by the singing and other instruments.

OK, so that was only my initial reaction. Later on yesterday I went to look at the DVDs. I see that although the lesson book tends to be cheat sheets, that is all that is really necessary. His description of what is on the page is a very thorough on the DVD. He does take you step-by-step and it is logical, clear and efficient. I watch the first five lessons which were basically an introduction and how to play the first song, silent night.

I then skipped to the melody section, and Tony B's description is spot on. It goes fast, but it is all there, note for note, measure by measure, and it makes absolute sense.

I like the pacing of the book. My prior complaint of the first three songs using the exact pattern does not seem so bad as each song was teaching you with different chords, and it is necessary to learn a few chords at a time in order to not get overwhelmed. He also includes some variations so that it is not so repetitive, so for example two of the 16 or so measures will be a different pattern to keep it from getting boring.

I also like how he presents the material. He does not talk down to you, and he does not sound like a salesman. He makes it clear that everything is going to take practice in that with each repetition things get easier. I like this approach because so many other courses promise to have you sounding like a pro in two weeks. Almost every product out there is gimmicky.

I like that there are different lessons. While I guess it could never substitute a live teacher, it seems to be the next best thing. I can watch a lesson and work on it until I master it then I could go to the next video. I need that structure. In other courses or books I am so tempted to jump to the next section. This message give me a better sense of discipline.

I think the CD is a handy companion, but as it is only 20 or so minutes long, I really wish they would have just repeated the songs as piano only, and then repeated them again as chords and Melody.

So overall I am going to say, so far so good. I am glad that my initial reaction appears to be wrong, and I look forward to diving into this course slowly and steadily. I will keep this thread updated as I go.


Thanks, Frosty.


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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
Grandman #2636676 04/26/17 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Grandman

Thanks much. Of course everyone will have their own opinion and the only way to truly know is to try. But that's what these discussions are for. Well, it looks as if this course is really geared towards accompaniment, although it includes a portion demonstrating solo piano. I find this very helpful, thanks.


My point, again, is that these discussion can only go so far. It is similar to trying to describe the taste of "strawberry" to someone who has never tasted it. At some point, the person will just have to taste one to determine if s/he enjoys the taste.

I think these discussions have given a lot of detail from a few different folks. There will be ongoing discussion as some of us progress through the course. However, I don't really think there is much more that can be said to give a person considering the course much more description of the "flavor" of it.

It is entirely possible that what I am seeing in the course and what I am trying to describe about the solo portion of it, may not be conveying enough to really give you a clear indication of how you will be able to successfully work with it. It seems that both FrostyKeys and I are in agreement that the information needed to play solo is there, but you do have to really work at it to get it.

It is possible that you could be passing up the course when it is possible that you would benefit from it. On the other hand, only you know your learning style and therefore, whether, based on what we have both said, it matches your needs. If so, then I suppose we have saved you the hassle of having to send it back if you had bought it and discovered it wasn't to your liking.

DH does take several songs through as solos, measure by measure. By following along and learning to play it as he does it in the video, I am coming to understand the mechanics of using these chord patterns and rhythm patterns to make a solo. It takes time to really go over and over a section to get it though.

The meat of the course is in the video lessons. The books are supporting information.

The lesson book, has the diagrams for the chords, practice "chord chains" (chord progressions) that occur in the song to be played, the rhythm pattern(s) used in the song, special patterns such as how to end the song, and other information, sort of like "Cliff notes" of the video lesson to refer to while you are playing the song in the song book.

When DH talks in the beginning about using the materials, he seems to treat this as the student watching the video away from the computer (maybe on a TV with a DVD player), and then going to the piano to play. The lesson book is intended to provide the information pertinent to the song to help with that.

What I did was to rip the DVDs onto my Microsoft Surface, which then sits on the music stand on my piano just like sheet music. With Transcribe! software, I can slow down and repeat small sections of the audio and video as often as needed. This REALLY helps with the solo lessons.

The song book consists of lead sheets for the songs covered in the course. A lead sheet consists of the melody line on the treble clef, with the chord symbols above and the lyrics below.

There is no separate book with the solo version written out. The purpose of the solo section is to show how to take what you have been playing from the lead sheet for accompaniment and put the melody on top, so you are always working from the same lead sheet, whether playing accompaniment or a solo version. This is what you will be doing with any other song outside the course too.

Five of the 13 songs in the course are provided as solos. In addition, he also plays parts of several standards as solos to illustrate how to apply these ideas to other songs. The intention of these is demonstration, rather than teaching you to play those songs.

To me, there is real value in all of what the course teaches because fingering has always been an issue for me. I just didn't get how people seem to work that our for themselves. For whatever reason (I am really not sure how it works this way), I just seem to get fingering as I play these solos. I think that playing the accompaniment just seems to get my fingers doing what they should. DH is very concise about the fingering for these patterns and rhythms, and that seems to be good enough fr me to just play the solos without too much focus on which finger is supposed to go where.

For somebody who already has that experience with fingering, this would probably not be a big deal. I just didn't seem to get it with any other means of study for some reason.

This is an example of the difficulty in knowing whether the course would be a good match for another individual. I wouldn't have known that the fingering issues would be resolved for me until I got the course and dug into it and then realized I wasn't questioning fingering anymore.

I hope this helps.

Tony



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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2636687 04/26/17 06:48 PM
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Here is one tip regarding working through the solo pieces...

The first lesson (61) is an overview of the process he uses for arranging. He uses the song "Tammy" as an example. He only does the first several measures, rather than going through the entire tune.
This is not one of the tunes in the course, so he isn't trying to show you how to play it. However, what he is doing is giving you the process he used to arrive at all the solos he does teach. Then, in each of the solo lessons for the songs in the course, he teaches how to play that song.

So, you need to go back and review the overview lesson several times during any of the solo lessons, so you can keep clearly in mind the overall process. The idea being that after learning a few of these solos, you get your fakebook and try your hand at a few of your own, using the process described in the overview.

I am now seeing this overview lesson to be key in understanding the whole idea of creating these solos. The process involves playing through the chords using the chord patterns while you figure out which rhythm pattern(s) you intend to use, and separately, playing just the melody to determine a comfortable fingering. He gives good guidance on how to do this in that overview lesson because you can really get screwed up if you don't figure out the fingering of the melody first.

Tony


Last edited by TonyB; 04/26/17 06:51 PM.

Roland V-Grand
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2637764 04/29/17 05:14 PM
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Finished silent night. Not with melody yet. I am going to wait a few chapters before I explore it. Started Today. Chords started having different patterns, but there is a method to it so hopefully I can adjust get them in my fingers. Also did the pedal lesson which is simple and to the point, however, I was already familiar with it.

Excited about it though. It motivates me to get to the bench.

Also, Tony, what are your thoughts about the rhythm add on?

Last edited by FrostyKeys; 04/29/17 08:58 PM.
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2637828 04/29/17 09:53 PM
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I have not started into the rhythm add-on yet, and won't until I am finished with the main course. However, it has 167 extra rhythm patterns. To me, the supplement is essentially a dictionary of rhythm patterns, rather than another course. Looking through it and listening to the CD, it is obvious that there is an expectation that you have completed the main course and know what to do with the necessarily brief explanations and demonstrations. As far as I am concerned, the better and broader my musical vocabulary, the better I can express myself.

Though I finished the Silent Night solo, I am playing it every day several times as my warm up. I have started into the Today solo now, and it is going slower than Silent Night did. I went through both Silent Night and Today as accompaniments, as well as the pedal lesson before starting the Silent Night solo. I am going to finish the Today solo before going on to the next tune.

I am learning a lot from this course. I have always thought there was a system to playing pop piano, and that if I found it, the fingering issues I have been curious about, would just take care of themselves. I am finding both to be true, so for me, this has been worth every penny.

The chord supplement did not arrive yet. David Jr. said to expect it either by the weekend or early next week at the latest. When it arrives, I intend to post at something about it. Keep in mind that these supplements are only $19.95 each. That is all there is for this course, so it isn't as if they are "nickel and dimeing us" with endless additions and lessons. I am impressed enough with the course to be more than willing to take both of these. For other folks, this may not be something they want or need.

Tony


Last edited by TonyB; 04/29/17 09:58 PM.

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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2638519 05/01/17 02:15 PM
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The discussion here about the DH course has been very interesting. ---- I'm almost tempted to give it a try, except for two things:

1. I don't see any mention on the site regarding a money back guarantee (ie: try for 7, 10, 30 days etc , return it if not satisfied, etc.). Most courses include some kind of guarantee like this. Maybe I just missed it?

2. Like most courses offered online (and this is my pet peeve about most of them), the only sample videos are of lessons at the most very basic of abilities. Although the course claims to be good for more advanced players who would like to "Learn to improvise and play by ear the way you’ve always wanted.", sadly no samples of lessons at this level are provided.

Combine #1 and #2 and the result is that someone at my level, who can already read music and play from scores but continues to struggle to learn to play effectively from lead sheets and has never learned to combine both hands to voice chords (in context of solo performance), is hesitant to lay out the $$$$ without some more assurance about the course's effectiveness.

Perhaps it might help if those of you who have the course, and like it, could either provide a sample of your current level of playing piano (ie - a short recording or perhaps a submission to a recital that you could refer us to) or at least describe your current level in words.

Please note that I am NOT knocking the course or those who have it and like it. On the contrary, I'd just like to be more informed about before possibly taking the plunge.

Thanks!


Bert
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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
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Originally Posted by newbert
1. I don't see any mention on the site regarding a money back guarantee (ie: try for 7, 10, 30 days etc , return it if not satisfied, etc.). Most courses include some kind of guarantee like this. Maybe I just missed it?


You did.

Look around. Click on MORE INFORMATION and you will see this ...

Quote

Guarantee, Returns & Exchanges:
We offer a 100% money-back guarantee. If you are not fully satisfied with an item and wish to return or exchange it, please return it within the 30-day guarantee period. Contact us for details.



Don

Casio PX-S1000, Focal Professional CMS 40 near-field monitors, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs (Seldom Used), Focus Rite Scarlett 2i2 Audio Interface, Yamaha MG06 Mixer
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
dmd #2638642 05/01/17 06:13 PM
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Originally Posted by dmd
Originally Posted by newbert
1. I don't see any mention on the site regarding a money back guarantee (ie: try for 7, 10, 30 days etc , return it if not satisfied, etc.). Most courses include some kind of guarantee like this. Maybe I just missed it?


You did.

Look around. Click on MORE INFORMATION and you will see this ...

Quote

Guarantee, Returns & Exchanges:
We offer a 100% money-back guarantee. If you are not fully satisfied with an item and wish to return or exchange it, please return it within the 30-day guarantee period. Contact us for details.



Maybe I'm blind, but I still don't see the MORE INFORMATION button. The page I'm looking at is: http://www.pianostar.com/index.php



Bert
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Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
newbert #2638647 05/01/17 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by newbert
Originally Posted by dmd
Originally Posted by newbert
1. I don't see any mention on the site regarding a money back guarantee (ie: try for 7, 10, 30 days etc , return it if not satisfied, etc.). Most courses include some kind of guarantee like this. Maybe I just missed it?


You did.

Look around. Click on MORE INFORMATION and you will see this ...

Quote

Guarantee, Returns & Exchanges:
We offer a 100% money-back guarantee. If you are not fully satisfied with an item and wish to return or exchange it, please return it within the 30-day guarantee period. Contact us for details.



Maybe I'm blind, but I still don't see the MORE INFORMATION button. The page I'm looking at is: http://www.pianostar.com/index.php



Click on ORDER NOW and you will see it


Don

Casio PX-S1000, Focal Professional CMS 40 near-field monitors, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs (Seldom Used), Focus Rite Scarlett 2i2 Audio Interface, Yamaha MG06 Mixer
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2638651 05/01/17 06:40 PM
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I posted this information on page 6 of this thread (wow! the thread has really grown...), but thanks DMD for posting again.

Tony




Roland V-Grand
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
TonyB #2638658 05/01/17 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by TonyB
I posted this information on page 6 of this thread (wow! the thread has really grown...), but thanks DMD for posting again.

Tony





Interesting. My browser only shows 3 pages.



Don

Casio PX-S1000, Focal Professional CMS 40 near-field monitors, SennHeiser HD 559 Headphones, Pianoteq and numerous other VSTs (Seldom Used), Focus Rite Scarlett 2i2 Audio Interface, Yamaha MG06 Mixer
Re: Best way to learn pop piano?
FrostyKeys #2638666 05/01/17 07:18 PM
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Mine now shows 8. I noticed that there is a difference between whether I am logged in or not, with fewer pages if I am not. Maybe there is a difference between browsers, screen resolution, or something along those lines? I have tried making the browser cover full screen and smaller, with no difference in page count.

Anyway, thanks so much for telling us about this course! It is definitely slow going now, but it is great fun. If I play Silent Night very slowly, I can get through it with few mistakes. It is only a matter of training muscle memory by warming up with that tune every day before going into "Today". That one is slower going for me. It really depends on how much experience you have going in. It is much easier for me to stay with this course than some of the others because, no matter how slow the going, it is still very rewarding.

Tony



Roland V-Grand
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