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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: bennevis] #2611414
02/03/17 07:46 PM
02/03/17 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by hello my name is

Also bennevis-- I found something else I like! wink
Schumann's "Carnaval" Op.9

Odd, considering it starts off rather noisily..... wink



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dB6UCcpeLQA
Yes, it does ... I like the part starting at about 6 minutes in, haha. wink


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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: hello my name is] #2611422
02/03/17 08:26 PM
02/03/17 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by bennevis
Originally Posted by hello my name is

Also bennevis-- I found something else I like! wink
Schumann's "Carnaval" Op.9

Odd, considering it starts off rather noisily..... wink



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dB6UCcpeLQA
Yes, it does ... I like the part starting at about 6 minutes in, haha. wink

I do like 'Chopin' by Schumann (14:45 in your link).

But most of all, the March of David against the Philistines, the noisiest section of all......(never could stand Philistines mad).


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: hello my name is] #2611459
02/04/17 01:33 AM
02/04/17 01:33 AM
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Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by outo

No method books as an adult. That made all the difference smile

Wah, what did you start with then?



Mixed stuff. Some little pieces my teacher gave me, simple pieces I found myself, Scarlatti sonatas (they have become the basics of my study) and some pieces a bit too difficult for me. I studied independently for about 3 months before starting lessons, so I had already relearned how to read notes. But technically my playing was all wrong according to my teacher smile


Lol, all wrong how? Do you remember what your teacher gave you? I guess it would help if you have studied independently for 3 months, then you wouldn't necessarily need the method books.


I sat wrong, I twisted my wrists, I did not use my hands and fingers efficiently, I moved around too much... You should know that she asked me to bring music that I like and I took her some advanced stuff such as Chopin etudes. So she was like: You want to play virtuoso stuff one day? Then you must learn virtuoso technique. Poor woman did not know what she got into....she's still trying wink

I have a list of the pieces I have studied on my pc, I'll look later. But the pieces she selected were specifically chosen for what she thought I needed to work on at the time.

I am not sure why anyone would "need" method books. Most method books are just a selection of pieces. Of course they are practical and I guess many students enjoy the process of going through the books and "advance" in some logical order. For me it's almost the opposite, I find too much order and structure in learning boring and demotivating.

Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: outo] #2611497
02/04/17 03:44 AM
02/04/17 03:44 AM
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Originally Posted by outo
I am not sure why anyone would "need" method books. Most method books are just a selection of pieces. Of course they are practical and I guess many students enjoy the process of going through the books and "advance" in some logical order. For me it's almost the opposite, I find too much order and structure in learning boring and demotivating.

Most kids adore their method books! Cute pictures. Catchy tunes. And regardless of how I try not to compare the kids, kids compare themselves to each other to see how far they've progressed.

Most method books are definitely not "just a selection of pieces."


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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: AZNpiano] #2611509
02/04/17 04:10 AM
02/04/17 04:10 AM
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Originally Posted by AZNpiano
Originally Posted by outo
I am not sure why anyone would "need" method books. Most method books are just a selection of pieces. Of course they are practical and I guess many students enjoy the process of going through the books and "advance" in some logical order. For me it's almost the opposite, I find too much order and structure in learning boring and demotivating.

Most kids adore their method books! Cute pictures. Catchy tunes. And regardless of how I try not to compare the kids, kids compare themselves to each other to see how far they've progressed.

Most method books are definitely not "just a selection of pieces."


Yes, I was simplifying a bit. But even as a kid I didn't care for cute pictures and "catchy" (=gay?) tunes... When I play my favorite piano music to my friends they ask me if I know anything else but "funeral music" LOL...I have also always liked dissonant modern harmonies and interesting rhythms.

But if a student likes the books then of course that's what you should use! It's just good to know that not everybody does.

Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: outo] #2611725
02/05/17 01:16 AM
02/05/17 01:16 AM
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Originally Posted by outo

I sat wrong, I twisted my wrists, I did not use my hands and fingers efficiently, I moved around too much... You should know that she asked me to bring music that I like and I took her some advanced stuff such as Chopin etudes. So she was like: You want to play virtuoso stuff one day? Then you must learn virtuoso technique. Poor woman did not know what she got into....she's still trying wink


Really wish I could see that!

Also.. funeral music?! I wonder if the kid who told me he "hates piano" would like funeral music....

Last edited by hello my name is; 02/05/17 01:16 AM.

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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: hello my name is] #2611731
02/05/17 02:43 AM
02/05/17 02:43 AM
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Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by outo

I sat wrong, I twisted my wrists, I did not use my hands and fingers efficiently, I moved around too much... You should know that she asked me to bring music that I like and I took her some advanced stuff such as Chopin etudes. So she was like: You want to play virtuoso stuff one day? Then you must learn virtuoso technique. Poor woman did not know what she got into....she's still trying wink


Really wish I could see that!

Also.. funeral music?! I wonder if the kid who told me he "hates piano" would like funeral music....


I just naturally gravitate towards slow, heavy and melancholic music in minor keys. I don't think of it as sad but it seems most people do.

Did you ask your student if he likes to listen to music and what kind? You might get a clue of what he would like. If you can find even one piece he really wants to play, you might get him interested on learning. Even I it's too hard it might work as a motivator.

It is of course possible that the piano is not the right instrument for him...but I too remember thinking at some point that I did not like piano or piano music at all. What got me back on track was a Scarlatti cd I bought at some record sale.

Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: outo] #2612195
02/06/17 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by outo

I sat wrong, I twisted my wrists, I did not use my hands and fingers efficiently, I moved around too much... You should know that she asked me to bring music that I like and I took her some advanced stuff such as Chopin etudes. So she was like: You want to play virtuoso stuff one day? Then you must learn virtuoso technique. Poor woman did not know what she got into....she's still trying wink


Really wish I could see that!

Also.. funeral music?! I wonder if the kid who told me he "hates piano" would like funeral music....


I just naturally gravitate towards slow, heavy and melancholic music in minor keys. I don't think of it as sad but it seems most people do.

Did you ask your student if he likes to listen to music and what kind? You might get a clue of what he would like. If you can find even one piece he really wants to play, you might get him interested on learning. Even I it's too hard it might work as a motivator.

It is of course possible that the piano is not the right instrument for him...but I too remember thinking at some point that I did not like piano or piano music at all. What got me back on track was a Scarlatti cd I bought at some record sale.

I agree with you, but as a teacher I will tell you that often the things students want to play, things that I would also like to teach them, require them to play at super-slo motion. Then AT BEST then end up memorizing something, one painful measure at a time, and when we start the next piece we are pushing the same stone up the same mountain.

The problem with playing things by Bach, Scarlatti, Chopin, you name it, is that these great composers were not teaching beginners. In the case of Scarlatti it is possible the he started with more basic things than his sonatas, but I have not seen them, and their is not one Scarlatti sonata that any beginner I've ever taught would not fail at.

Later? If a student got to that level and only wanted to play Scarlatti, I would be a very happy teacher.


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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: Gary D.] #2612290
02/07/17 12:38 AM
02/07/17 12:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by outo

I sat wrong, I twisted my wrists, I did not use my hands and fingers efficiently, I moved around too much... You should know that she asked me to bring music that I like and I took her some advanced stuff such as Chopin etudes. So she was like: You want to play virtuoso stuff one day? Then you must learn virtuoso technique. Poor woman did not know what she got into....she's still trying wink


Really wish I could see that!

Also.. funeral music?! I wonder if the kid who told me he "hates piano" would like funeral music....


I just naturally gravitate towards slow, heavy and melancholic music in minor keys. I don't think of it as sad but it seems most people do.

Did you ask your student if he likes to listen to music and what kind? You might get a clue of what he would like. If you can find even one piece he really wants to play, you might get him interested on learning. Even I it's too hard it might work as a motivator.

It is of course possible that the piano is not the right instrument for him...but I too remember thinking at some point that I did not like piano or piano music at all. What got me back on track was a Scarlatti cd I bought at some record sale.

I agree with you, but as a teacher I will tell you that often the things students want to play, things that I would also like to teach them, require them to play at super-slo motion. Then AT BEST then end up memorizing something, one painful measure at a time, and when we start the next piece we are pushing the same stone up the same mountain.

The problem with playing things by Bach, Scarlatti, Chopin, you name it, is that these great composers were not teaching beginners. In the case of Scarlatti it is possible the he started with more basic things than his sonatas, but I have not seen them, and their is not one Scarlatti sonata that any beginner I've ever taught would not fail at.

Later? If a student got to that level and only wanted to play Scarlatti, I would be a very happy teacher.


I am not sure if we are talking about absolute beginners here. I'd say any kid or adult no matter how fast a learner needs months to get the absolute basics. But does everyone need a year or more?

True, Scarlatti is no beginner music. But I don't think it's necessary to wait for five years either. There are sonatas that require no advanced technique to be played, although you may not sound like the masters. One could play only one movement and some of them are pretty short.

For a student that is not motivated it might even be a good idea to make easier arrangements of some classics. My point was, it should be possible to find a solution to lack of interest with a student who does not suffer from total disinterest in music. It just requires imagination.

I sometimes feel that people are too obsessed with "levels". You either can learn a piece to reasonable quality in reasonable time or not. If people have different strengths and interests, why should everyone advance in a similar way? That idea has always been a little off putting to me. Why not look for things to enjoy one's strengths while gradually working on your weaknesses at the same time? If one CAN manage a piece above one's "level" even though one cannot manage other pieces from that level, why should one wait if that piece will motivate one to continue lessons and practice? Is suffering boredom and lack of motivation really necessary?

I guess it's up to me to prove it's not, since I definitely have been broken many rules myself wink

Last edited by outo; 02/07/17 12:42 AM.
Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: outo] #2612318
02/07/17 04:18 AM
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Originally Posted by outo

I am not sure if we are talking about absolute beginners here. I'd say any kid or adult no matter how fast a learner needs months to get the absolute basics. But does everyone need a year or more?

Everyone is different. Recently I heard someone famous say this about Roger Federer: "That's just ridiculous. Don't try that at home. You can't teach talent."

So if you are teaching an amazingly talented student, lots of things can happen in the first year.

There is one and only one danger in playing things that are too difficult to read. If you take forever to slowly master something, measure by measure, in a way that you can only play a page or a piece by totally memorizing it in slow motion, chances are you will have to push a similar big stone up the same mountain again and again. The logical end to this would be the path of someone like Joseph Hoffman, known for playing a somewhat limited repertoire amazingly well but limited by lack of reading.

The problem is that most of us won't reach anything like that level and still will have a horribly limited repertoire.

My way of teaching is to insist that things get learned rather quickly, at least a few pages a week that are new, but I don't worry about perfection on anything that is new. I prefer to grab things that have already been learned, reviewing, and THEN try to step the polishing up. You have to be careful that very wrong things are not learned while working fast, such as weird fingerings that form really bad habits, and you have to watch out of tension, because that can hurt the body.
Quote

True, Scarlatti is no beginner music. But I don't think it's necessary to wait for five years either. There are sonatas that require no advanced technique to be played, although you may not sound like the masters. One could play only one movement and some of them are pretty short.

It didn't take me five years to get to Rachmaninov. wink

Someone who makes fast progress could definitely get to one of the easier Scarlatti Sonatas after a year. All you need is a love of Scarlatti and the willingness to put in the time.
Quote

For a student that is not motivated it might even be a good idea to make easier arrangements of some classics.

Ok for something that is not for the piano but deadly if it is a piano composition because later simplifications get well learned and fight with the correct version.

Excellent for anything "pop". I have a little kid who is going to play for his mother's wedding (second marriage), and she wanted him to play "Someday My Prince Will Come", Disney, Snow White. Mom bought an easy play book, so I played through maybe 10 selections, and the arrangements were relatively decent. The kid learned it in two weeks, and I told him that if he gets it really smooth, I may add more notes and flesh it out a bit, as I did for him in a lesson to show how that is done.

I consider this a 100% successful detour because I could discuss how to add pedal, how to look for chords, other things.

I have taught ANYTHING to ANYONE over the years, no limitation on what I like myself, unless a student was not good enough to do it, or the music was so obviously poor that God Almight couldn't make it sound right. I run into problems with game music, things that sound find played by machines but that don't work well for human hands played real-time.
Quote

I sometimes feel that people are too obsessed with "levels". You either can learn a piece to reasonable quality in reasonable time or not.

I have collected music for decades, and I put it into "folders". I have no limits on what goes in any folder except that if folder D or H or ZZ1 contains 15 things, they have to be playable by someone who is on that level. This has nothing to do with style, period and so on. I might have something from Harry Potter in the same folder as something by Bach. I'm teaching skills, then each thing we play just uses those skills. There is a lot of leeway on any level. If someone want to play something harder, I print out a page and try it. If it works, we continue. If we run into a wall, I simply say, "Let's come back to this a bit later when you have more skills."
Quote

If one CAN manage a piece above one's "level" even though one cannot manage other pieces from that level, why should one wait if that piece will motivate one to continue lessons and practice? Is suffering boredom and lack of motivation really necessary?

What you CAN play IS your level. If you can't manage other pieces in a so-called level, the music is not sorted correctly for your skills.

Everything I teach is arranged according to what works for most people. If I teach something that seems to belong in a level and several people struggle with it, I move it to a higher level. Then if it still causes problems, I throw it out if it is something that does not have a clear purpose and is not liked by most students. About 50% of my teaching has to do with moving things to where they work best.

I find any graded method books to be horribly wrong in that way, jumping from one thing that is easy, something else that is a bit challenging, then something else that just doesn't work in that book for most students.

I mentioned the books I grew up with, Journeys through Bookland. The magic of those books was that although they were "graded" in 10 volumes, you could move through all 10 volumes at will, and of course that meant that if you were good enough to read SOME of the stories in a volume, most likely you read anything in lower volumes. But that didn't mean you couldn't stretch yourself with something even higher.

I was fascinated with myths and started to search through all volumes. It's not quite that easy with music, but it is similar.

I did the same thing with music. I had stacks of music I inherited from my aunts and my grandmother, and I explored everything. I mangled some things, but that's how I became an expert reader of music and it lead to one of my first jobs, getting paid as a vocal accompanist at around age 15.

Last edited by Gary D.; 02/07/17 04:22 AM.

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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: Gary D.] #2612408
02/07/17 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.


There is one and only one danger in playing things that are too difficult to read. If you take forever to slowly master something, measure by measure, in a way that you can only play a page or a piece by totally memorizing it in slow motion, chances are you will have to push a similar big stone up the same mountain again and again. The logical end to this would be the path of someone like Joseph Hoffman, known for playing a somewhat limited repertoire amazingly well but limited by lack of reading.

The problem is that most of us won't reach anything like that level and still will have a horribly limited repertoire.


I see your point but I am not sure if that's really a problem for many adult amateurs (or kids destined to be nothing more)? How much repertoire does one really need or want? It must vary greatly. One should be able to read, but not necessarily play anything without memorizing imo. It's great if one can, but that level of reading is not possible for everyone, so should one just stop advancing in other areas?


Originally Posted by Gary D.

My way of teaching is to insist that things get learned rather quickly, at least a few pages a week that are new, but I don't worry about perfection on anything that is new. I prefer to grab things that have already been learned, reviewing, and THEN try to step the polishing up. You have to be careful that very wrong things are not learned while working fast, such as weird fingerings that form really bad habits, and you have to watch out of tension, because that can hurt the body.


A few page a week sounds totally impossible for me, so I guess we are lucky that you are not my teacher smile
Although I am nor sure what you really mean. I don't consider a piece learned until it's quite polished...but that's just me, for me only perfection is really worthy of anything. Unfortunately, it makes things difficult.


Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by outo

For a student that is not motivated it might even be a good idea to make easier arrangements of some classics.

Ok for something that is not for the piano but deadly if it is a piano composition because later simplifications get well learned and fight with the correct version.

Again not sure this is a real problem? Yes, you can "forever ruin" a piece or two, but if that gets the student interested in learning and practicing, surely it was worth it? There's plenty of piano music, so I don't see how this could be an issue?


Originally Posted by Gary D.
Originally Posted by outo

If one CAN manage a piece above one's "level" even though one cannot manage other pieces from that level, why should one wait if that piece will motivate one to continue lessons and practice? Is suffering boredom and lack of motivation really necessary?

What you CAN play IS your level. If you can't manage other pieces in a so-called level, the music is not sorted correctly for your skills.

Everything I teach is arranged according to what works for most people. If I teach something that seems to belong in a level and several people struggle with it, I move it to a higher level. Then if it still causes problems, I throw it out if it is something that does not have a clear purpose and is not liked by most students. About 50% of my teaching has to do with moving things to where they work best.

I find any graded method books to be horribly wrong in that way, jumping from one thing that is easy, something else that is a bit challenging, then something else that just doesn't work in that book for most students.


I was referring to grades or levels the way they are usually used. But this is how I see it: If I can play a Scarlatti sonata that is graded 8 but cannot play a Schumann piece graded 5 it's just because they present different challenges and I have only really conqured the other. For me it's fine to attack them in any order I want to or not at all if they do not interest me. I am an adult learner and free to explore music in the way I want to. If my teacher would not accept it I would look for another one that does.

Last edited by outo; 02/07/17 02:24 PM.
Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: outo] #2612418
02/07/17 02:27 PM
02/07/17 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by Gary D.


There is one and only one danger in playing things that are too difficult to read. If you take forever to slowly master something, measure by measure, in a way that you can only play a page or a piece by totally memorizing it in slow motion, chances are you will have to push a similar big stone up the same mountain again and again. The logical end to this would be the path of someone like Joseph Hoffman, known for playing a somewhat limited repertoire amazingly well but limited by lack of reading.

The problem is that most of us won't reach anything like that level and still will have a horribly limited repertoire.


I see your point but I am not sure if that's really a problem for many adult amateurs? How much repertoire does one really need or want? It must vary greatly.


I'm sure it does vary greatly. But I think (?) the point Gary was trying to make is quite similar to one I once found myself trying to make, in relating the story of the actress who once told Terry Gross of Fresh Air that she didn't consider herself truly able to play the piano, because she could play only one piece.

She had once finagled her way into a role by telling the director that she played the piano, even tough she didn't really. Or in any case, hadn't for many years. And even many years ago, she'd only ever done things of the LH chords, RH melody variety. Now, she had to play a particular Song Without Words (Mendelssohn) twice a night, as part of her role. After 30 days of non-stop practice under the guidance of a hastily hired coach, she got the piece into her fingers. She subsequently performed it twice a night for months. Almost inevitably, she learned to perform that one piece flawlessly. But she never really learned to play anything else, because she didn't have the skills (reading, practice routines, self-monitoring, ...) for that.

It got me wondering whether I can really consider myself able to play the piano. Because to me, a musician is not someone who can play a few pieces well -- not even if they're flawless to the point of "people would pay to hear this". To me, a true musician is much more than that. The word musician as I understand it implies, among many other things, a wide repertoire and the ability to expand it on short notice. The approach to learning new music that Gary describes above (slowly, slowly memorizing a piece measure by measure, and then another one, and then another one, without necessarily even retaining the ability to play the pieces learned this way for a very long time) is not going to lead to that kind of ability.

Ask yourself: to you, what does it mean to say "I can play the piano"? Doesn't it involve more than just the ability to produce a more or less reasonable rendition of the latest couple pieces of music you happen to have learned? And if it does involve more than that, then while pushing one boulder after the other slowly up the hill, are you actually learning those other things, too?


Plodding through piano music at a frustratingly slow pace since 9/2012.

Standard disclaimer: I teach many things. Piano is not one of them.
Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: The Monkeys] #2612426
02/07/17 03:18 PM
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I basically quit playing classical music the moment I stopped taking formal lessons at 18. Good thing I found jazz & pop otherwise I would have stopped playing completely.

Classical music doesn't give a foundation for anything other than classical. Jazz is a completely different animal, rhythms, improv, altered scales...
Same with pop.

Classical does give you the proper technique for fingering, but you can learn that in other genres too.

Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: Saranoya] #2612428
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Originally Posted by Saranoya
Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by Gary D.


There is one and only one danger in playing things that are too difficult to read. If you take forever to slowly master something, measure by measure, in a way that you can only play a page or a piece by totally memorizing it in slow motion, chances are you will have to push a similar big stone up the same mountain again and again. The logical end to this would be the path of someone like Joseph Hoffman, known for playing a somewhat limited repertoire amazingly well but limited by lack of reading.

The problem is that most of us won't reach anything like that level and still will have a horribly limited repertoire.


I see your point but I am not sure if that's really a problem for many adult amateurs? How much repertoire does one really need or want? It must vary greatly.


I'm sure it does vary greatly. But I think (?) the point Gary was trying to make is quite similar to one I once found myself trying to make, in relating the story of the actress who once told Terry Gross of Fresh Air that she didn't consider herself truly able to play the piano, because she could play only one piece.

She had once finagled her way into a role by telling the director that she played the piano, even tough she didn't really. Or in any case, hadn't for many years. And even many years ago, she'd only ever done things of the LH chords, RH melody variety. Now, she had to play a particular Song Without Words (Mendelssohn) twice a night, as part of her role. After 30 days of non-stop practice under the guidance of a hastily hired coach, she got the piece into her fingers. She subsequently performed it twice a night for months. Almost inevitably, she learned to perform that one piece flawlessly. But she never really learned to play anything else, because she didn't have the skills (reading, practice routines, self-monitoring, ...) for that.

It got me wondering whether I can really consider myself able to play the piano. Because to me, a musician is not someone who can play a few pieces well -- not even if they're flawless to the point of "people would pay to hear this". To me, a true musician is much more than that. The word musician as I understand it implies, among many other things, a wide repertoire and the ability to expand it on short notice. The approach to learning new music that Gary describes above (slowly, slowly memorizing a piece measure by measure, and then another one, and then another one, without necessarily even retaining the ability to play the pieces learned this way for a very long time) is not going to lead to that kind of ability.

Ask yourself: to you, what does it mean to say "I can play the piano"?


Then again, what's the point of asking such questions really? Maybe it's better to think less and do more smile

It's easy to point out extremes, but there's certainly plenty of middle ground between the slow painstaking way of memorizing just one piece and learning a few pages of music a week, which just seems a lot to expect from everybody. And IF memorizing is the ultimate goal as it often is, many think it's best to do it as early as possible. If one is not a naturally fast memorizer and does that, decides best fingerings, thinks of musical issues and solves the technical challenges all at once, it will take time (especially if time for piano is limited) but then it's properly learned from the start. And one does learn new skills at the same time. I see no problem with this approach and it suits me. Other ways may suit other students with different resources.

Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: The Monkeys] #2612439
02/07/17 04:04 PM
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Maybe you need to buy him an electric guitar and give him some Jimi Hendrix albums lol

Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: Gary D.] #2612498
02/07/17 07:42 PM
02/07/17 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.
Quote

For a student that is not motivated it might even be a good idea to make easier arrangements of some classics.

Ok for something that is not for the piano but deadly if it is a piano composition because later simplifications get well learned and fight with the correct version.

Excellent for anything "pop". ..., and I told him that if he gets it really smooth, I may add more notes and flesh it out a bit, as I did for him in a lesson to show how that is done.


When you do this, do you write out a fingering for the "easy" version that'll stay consistent with the "fleshed out" version? So you're just adding, never un-learning?



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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: Gary D.] #2612553
02/08/17 01:12 AM
02/08/17 01:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Gary D.


I find any graded method books to be horribly wrong in that way, jumping from one thing that is easy, something else that is a bit challenging, then something else that just doesn't work in that book for most students.


What do you mean by this?
Shouldn't graded method books be very methodical in difficulty in going from one piece to the next?


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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: hello my name is] #2612557
02/08/17 01:20 AM
02/08/17 01:20 AM
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Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by Gary D.


I find any graded method books to be horribly wrong in that way, jumping from one thing that is easy, something else that is a bit challenging, then something else that just doesn't work in that book for most students.


What do you mean by this?
Shouldn't graded method books be very methodical in difficulty in going from one piece to the next?


The problem with them imo is that If you go through them diligently you may be spending a lot of time with things you already learned quickly and could put to better use with more interesting music. And then you may get stuck with things that are difficult for you but with little musical value. Good teachers probably do skip and supplement to prevent this.

Last edited by outo; 02/08/17 01:20 AM.
Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: hello my name is] #2615777
02/18/17 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by Gary D.


I find any graded method books to be horribly wrong in that way, jumping from one thing that is easy, something else that is a bit challenging, then something else that just doesn't work in that book for most students.


What do you mean by this?
Shouldn't graded method books be very methodical in difficulty in going from one piece to the next?

SHOULD be?

Yes. That is what they are meant to do.

Do they succeed?

Not very well...


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Re: Will he ever grow to like classical music? [Re: outo] #2615789
02/18/17 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by outo
Originally Posted by hello my name is
Originally Posted by Gary D.


I find any graded method books to be horribly wrong in that way, jumping from one thing that is easy, something else that is a bit challenging, then something else that just doesn't work in that book for most students.


What do you mean by this?
Shouldn't graded method books be very methodical in difficulty in going from one piece to the next?


The problem with them imo is that If you go through them diligently you may be spending a lot of time with things you already learned quickly and could put to better use with more interesting music. And then you may get stuck with things that are difficult for you but with little musical value. Good teachers probably do skip and supplement to prevent this.


Yes. No one method will suit every student. So whether you use another method book or your own, you will have to adjust as needed.


private piano/voice teacher FT

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