2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad) Piano Sight Reading
train piano sight reading with your iPhone or iPad
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
73 members (Alex.G, astrotoy, 24000rpm, 36251, antune, anotherscott, AWilley, accordeur, 15 invisible), 622 guests, and 476 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,667
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,667
Originally Posted by rev2003
Thanks for the comments. We are still trying to decide. I did see a listing for a used upright Boston in our areas for a little over $4000 that has been recently tuned and maintained, but is that just an average piano and a digital would be better than that? Pianos are confusing...


It would be better to go to a local dealer for your first acoustic piano, used or new. Otherwise you'll need to hire a technician to check the piano out beforehand.

For $4,000, you can get a very good digital piano. It might be best to start asking in the digital piano forum for specific suggestions.

Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 33
R
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
R
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 33
Originally Posted by Retsacnal
Originally Posted by Ryan Crossette
As a player myself, I would much prefer to play on a good digital than an average or below average upright piano.


What do you say to these propositions?
  • Boston = Average
  • Essex < Average
Reference


The Essex upright pianos are built better than most pianos on the market. In fact several features aren't found on other pianos until you climb much higher in price. Hardly below average. Sounds like a line of someone still promoting the idea of Essex being the same thing as a Pearl River with a different name on it.

A Boston upright for $4000 may be a good deal depending on age and condition. I would second having a tech check it out first.


Sales Professional
Steinway Piano Gallery
Spokane, WA
509-327-4266
http://www.steinwayspokane.com
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 6,451
6000 Post Club Member
Offline
6000 Post Club Member
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 6,451
Originally Posted by rev2003
Thanks for the comments. We are still trying to decide. I did see a listing for a used upright Boston in our areas for a little over $4000 that has been recently tuned and maintained, but is that just an average piano and a digital would be better than that? Pianos are confusing...


Which model? How old?

With a budget up to roughly $2,000 (including moving and maintenance), digital is really the way to go for a beginner.

$2,000-4,000 includes some nice used acoustic uprights, some entry-level new ones, and higher-end digitals. This is really a matter of personal preference at this pricing "rung". There are advantages and disadvantages to each choice.


Pianist, teacher, apprentice technician, internet addict.
Piano Review Editor - Acoustic and Digital Piano Buyer
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 10
R
rev2003 Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
R
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 10
I'm not sure on the age of the Boston. In the listing, there's a picture that shows where it says: UP-118E and 108385, which I assume is the model and serial number. But the listing confuses me because it says it is 45", but from what I read the 118E is 46". It also looks like the piano is being sold by someone who tunes pianos in the area I live.

If we said our budget is $2000-4000, would you go digital or acoustic?

Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 29,422
B
BDB Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Jun 2003
Posts: 29,422
118 cm is about 46.5 inches. Heights tend to be somewhat approximate, because of the casters.

As far as I am concerned, digital is a completely different instrument from an acoustic piano. They have some similarities, but the difference is about as great as between a harpsichord and a fortepiano in the crossover period.


Semipro Tech
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,340
P
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
P
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,340
Originally Posted by rev2003

If we said our budget is $2000-4000, would you go digital or acoustic?


It's a reasonable question, but there is no clear answer, imo.

If you are open to buying a *used* acoustic piano, then with knowledgeable help (from a piano consultant, tuner, salesperson, etc) you can find a fine piano in this price range.

Conversely, you could buy many a good digital piano, no matter whether new or used, for similar money.






Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 157
L
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
L
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 157
Where we live, $5000 could get you a U1 in a good condition from a reputable dealer.

Unless you have neighbor issues like we do, I'd go for an acoustic piano.

Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 33
R
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
R
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 33
108385 is the serial number and corresponds to a piano built in 1994-1995. This is pre-performance edition. (makes a big difference) A 27 year old Boston (or almost any brand) upright would have to be in like new condition for $4000 to be a great deal.


Sales Professional
Steinway Piano Gallery
Spokane, WA
509-327-4266
http://www.steinwayspokane.com
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 10
R
rev2003 Offline OP
Junior Member
OP Offline
Junior Member
R
Joined: Jan 2017
Posts: 10
Thank you!

Joined: Dec 2015
Posts: 97
J
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
J
Joined: Dec 2015
Posts: 97
Originally Posted by Charles Cohen
There's a recurring suggestion in several threads in the "Digital Pianos" forum, and some here:

. . . DO NOT control the piano's volume by turning down the "Volume" knob, during practice.

He needs to learn to control the piano's loudness _with his fingers_, not with a knob. If he ever transitions to an acoustic piano, or ever plays a digital piano seriously, he'll thank you for the discipline.


I was thinking about this and have to kind of agree and disagree at the same time.

I agree that you should learn to control the volume level using your fingers, not the volume control. I started and still play a digital, and I think my capability in this is probably weaker than those who started with acoustics.

However, if we think the volume as a dynamics thing, not absolute volume, then volume knob let's you use same finger force for pp..ff as you'd use on acoustic, but get volume range of say 30..60 dB instead of 55..85 dB. Your touch doesn't need to adjust, just your brain to varying levels of volume.

Indeed, I'd say if you adjust your touch on acoustic to play a piece so ff will become 60 dB, it will be extremely hard to achieve something like 30 dB on pp (just a rough guess at difference in dB between those) on an acoustic, as you can control the volume only so much. Even if you can, one could argue that practicing to play a piece so quietly if you'd then play it louder in a concert or teacher's place is just a different kind of drawback than "getting used to having a volume control".

Of course, having a digital set to half volume that it would produce on acoustic will mean you'll have hard time on an acoustic unless you practice on one as well regularly. Just saying that being able to set the absolute volume level on a digital is not inherently bad thing. The argument is more about what kind of adjustment is easier for the brain, and is there a difference on controlling an acoustic between two absolute volume ranges.

One way or the other, you definitely should not use volume control during practice to control dynamics. But before practice, maybe.

Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,342
M
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,342
I started playing when I was nine and learned primarily on keyboards and digitals. I taught myself and play by ear. I only got my first acoustic piano three years ago. It does make a world of difference, but I would much rather have a nice digital than most uprights, as Ryan said above. You've gotten a lot of advice and a diversity of opinions here, but being as this is the acoustic piano section of the forum, you'll see a bias toward the hammers and wood variety of piano here.

For your budget there are MANY good options out there:

- Casio Privia (the newer Casios are fantastic)
- Physis H1
- Roland RD-700
- Kawai MP11
- Nord Piano 3
- Kurzweil Artis

Some of these can be a little complex, but at that age I was turned loose on my teacher's Clavinova, Kurzwel ES Grande, and Juno 106 and was in hog heaven. The most important thing about all of these is you turn them on and they sound reasonably like a grand piano, especially for a beginner.



Just don't waste your time with cabinet digitals like the Roland HP. You end up paying much more for a glitzy particleboard enclosure. Most of Yamaha's digital actions can be really heavy and might fatigue a kid's hands, but that's just my opinion.

Acoustic pianos are always nice, but your son is very young. In the (hopefully unlikely) event he doesn't stick with this it's a lot easier to sell or move a digital than it is to unload an old upright. Getting a performance-oriented digital piano has the benefit of being easy to move around the house, more FUN (yes, this is actually important), and with a more robust resale value when it comes time to trade up. And you're not an awful parent--you're an awesome parent. You've waded into an online forum for chrissakes to find the perfect choice for your son. I can assure you that as someone who went from ALL digitals and keyboards to a grand piano after nearly two decades of playing, I made the adjustment fairly quickly.

Best of luck.


2012 NY Steinway Model B | Kawai MP11 | Nord Stage 3 Compact | Moog Matriarch | ASM Hydrasynth 49 | Sequential Circuits Prophet 10 Rev4 | Yamaha ModX 61
Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Ken Knapp, Piano World 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Couch to Concert Hall
Couch to Concert Hall
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
The Logo of the Future - Steingraeber
by Skjalg - 04/19/21 10:47 AM
Practuce With Czerny
by BbAltered - 04/19/21 10:05 AM
What to check when getting a new piano
by Dong Huynh - 04/19/21 05:13 AM
Standchen which version of sheet music ?
by jzmeister1 - 04/19/21 03:47 AM
Strings termination
by Guido, Roma - Italy - 04/19/21 03:04 AM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics206,395
Posts3,084,114
Members101,239
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5