2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.9 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Free Trial
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

Who's Online Now
27 registered members (Colin Miles, Animisha, giu, Gene Nelson, AYS, CyberGene, CognitaP, earlofmar, 5 invisible), 277 guests, and 431 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
What adult beginners should be learning #2435410 06/25/15 09:35 AM
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
P
PamDD Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
I'm discouraged. I'm making little progress. I'm with my second teacher in the last five months and still feel as though I'm being coached rather than taught. There isn't any logic behind the pieces that she or I select. We start with a couple of scales and then move on to three or four pieces we've both selected and are really a little too hard. My niece is an accomplished pianist. She said my focus should be on four things:

1. Playing scales--a lot!
2. Learning the major and associated minor scales
3. Rhythm (my teacher is good about emphasizing counting)
4. Sight reading since that's my goal

For example, should I concentrate on the CM and Am scales, it's associated chords, etc. and playing pieces in those keys before moving on to GM, etc.?

Any tips on how to practice sight reading?

What other things should my teacher be working with me on?

Finally, I'm thinking of just stopping the lessons for a while and just practicing the basics as discussed above.

Thoughts?



(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435419 06/25/15 09:59 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 759
I
Isabelle1949 Offline
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 759
No to playing scales a lot. Best to focus on the scales related to a piece you are trying to learn and don't play them a lot. If a piece is in C Major, learn that scale, the C Minor scale and the G Major scale (G is the V or dominant in the key of C and is very important)

Before you try to play or sight read a selection, review it carefully away from the piano. Look for similar shapes of the notes, look for notes that move in steps or chromatically. These are things you really won't notice if you just play off the bat and will make it harder. Sight read material well below your level. Proficiency at sight reading improves over time and the only way to gain that is doing it for a long time. Many years ago I remember my fingers literally crawling from note to note as my brain made the connection between the black dots on the page and the keys on the piano!

Unless scales are going to be a major part of your repertoire, don't play them a lot. Recently read where certain area of the brain does not pay attention to scales as it does to musical forms. In essence scales can be considered mindless. But it is important to know the scales of the composition, since it will help you recognize patterns in your music.

Last edited by Isabelle1949; 06/25/15 10:04 AM.

Always working to improve "Chopsticks". I'll never give up on it.
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435420 06/25/15 10:02 AM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,647
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,647
There are still teachers who have no sense of direction when it comes to adults (maybe even for younger students) - I don't know what the proportion might be. So yes, there are thoughts.

The actual thing that you want to be getting are the skills which are gradually built up. Pieces are still involved - in fact, some teachers might be so astute at hiding the skills they want to teach inside the pieces, that you might not even know they're pushing skills - but the point is not the pieces, but getting the skills. It's also note quite scales vs. pieces, because even in scales, you need to have skills being refined. In pieces, scales, or etudes, you have the actual physical motions ("technique"), a certain degree of "theory" (even knowing that G major has an F# in it is the start of theory), and how to approach these things when practising. A good teacher will aim for that.

A complication for adults is that some teachers think adult students won't accept working toward skills, and will balk, so they give what they think we want. Others simply don't know how to teach skills (to anyone), and then, if a lot of the good teachers don't want to teach adults (because of commonly seen attitudes) then what do we end up with? It may help if from the onset you tell prospective teachers that you want to learn whatever is needed for playing the piano well, and you are willing to do the work over the long haul. Ask what that teacher's priorities are for students, what ideally they would like a student do with them. You may see a different side here and there if you try that.

Before throwing the baby out with the bathwater, are there things that your present teacher keeps stressing? You wrote there is no sense in the pieces being selected. But what if she is after something else? But then:
Quote
We start with a couple of scales and then move on to three or four pieces we've both selected and are really a little too hard.

That does sound awfully random, and not very teacher-led. (?)

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435427 06/25/15 10:30 AM
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,171
R
Rerun Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
R
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,171

Quote
Finally, I'm thinking of just stopping the lessons for a while and just practicing the basics as discussed above.

Thoughts?


I'd say if you are primarily interested in playing Hymns, blues/pop, show tunes, Christmas Carols and the like for family and friends, try playing some simple stuff by ear and just see what happens. There are an awful lot of ears sitting around libraries, etc. wanting something interesting and fun to do. grin Playing great music isn't out of their reach fairly quickly.


Rerun

"Seat of the pants piano player" DMD


[Linked Image]



Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435433 06/25/15 11:12 AM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,664
malkin Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,664
Before you can sight read, you will need to be able to play. It doesn't make sense to try to become a proficient reader in a foreign language that you do not speak; as keystring says, you need to learn some skills.

When you play pieces that are a little bit difficult does your teacher provide instruction about how to play sections that you cannot play? Like, "move your hand this way" or "do this with your wrist here" or whatever? If you are just getting feedback like "you played a wrong note here" then look for a new teacher!


Learner
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435439 06/25/15 11:36 AM
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 489
blackjack1777 Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 489
Hi Pam,

Have you considered getting a teacher that uses a method book? The great thing about a method book is that it moves you along at a structure and manageable pace and tries to cover all of the basic material that a new piano learner should be learning.

I've been learning piano for only a bit longer than you (~9 months). I have made great progress with my teacher. We are using Alfred's and it covers theory, scales, technique, etc and it progress at a challenging yet manageable pace. There are lots of other method books out there as well that this board might be able to recommend.

While method books aren't for everyone they certainly do offer structure which I'm assuming from your question may be something you're missing with your current teacher.


Half way through Alfred's Adult All in One - Level 2

https://soundcloud.com/blackjack1777/
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: Isabelle1949] #2435440 06/25/15 11:55 AM
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
P
PamDD Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
Isabelle, I talked to my teacher within an hour of posting my questions. I got the sense that she was waiting for me to come to the conclusion that I was on the wrong track. As someone else said, I think teachers are a little uncertain how to handle adult students and I'm sure I gave some wrong signals about what I wanted to accomplish. Hmm... Still, I am a little encouraged.

I appreciate your input on the scales. Unfortunately, since I met with her before I saw your answer, I told her I thought that's what I needed to do, so I have a homework assignment to work on the C,G,D,A&E scales. However, at least I can put more effort into the pieces and their associated scales without over-practicing the individual scales.

Your comments about sight reading track right along with my teacher's. Also, it confirms what I thought might be correct, that is, look over the piece and look for patterns, etc.

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435441 06/25/15 11:57 AM
Joined: Jun 2015
Posts: 196
N
Noonie Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
N
Joined: Jun 2015
Posts: 196
I find this topic interesting, because I'm new to piano, but I also have experience and strong opinions about learning / instructions and how in so many aspects of our lives there is a great lack of clarity with these things. I joke with my wife all the time that it's my pet peave. Take for instance very basic things like cooking instructions on the back of a package or instructions on how to assemble furnitute, well I find 10-20% of these "may" be well written, the rest lead to stress.

I don't profess to be effective at writing or giving directions/instructions, but it's also not my job (though I've done some of this in the past). I have a problem with teachers who don't know how to "teach", and even more so, businesses that hire teachers who don't know how to teach, probably because they themselves know little of it.

I think there is great skill needed to write effective instructions, and even more so to deliver them via a course or invidual/group instruction. I once followed a lady's online videos on learning guitar. They were incredible. There are probably millions of better guitarists than her, but out of the many instructional videos I've watched and teachers I've had, no one was as effective as her. She use to get a lot of praise, from a varied audience of followers, and she said it wasn't so important that she knew guitar, but that she knew how to educate. Now when I pick up any piano book, or talk to a prospective teacher, I have this in the back of my mind. And I've yet to have an experience with piano that was 50% as effectiveas as that guitar experience.

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: blackjack1777] #2435444 06/25/15 12:02 PM
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
P
PamDD Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
I took lessons for a few months about 20 years ago and didn't consider myself as a a very new beginner, but I probably would have progressed at a faster clip if I had just started over with a method book.

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: Rerun] #2435446 06/25/15 12:03 PM
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
P
PamDD Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
I am mainly interested in playing classical music... about 85% vs 15% other types.

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435455 06/25/15 12:42 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,647
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,647
Something slightly puzzling:
Originally Posted by PamDD
Isabelle, I talked to my teacher within an hour of posting my questions. I got the sense that she was waiting for me to come to the conclusion that I was on the wrong track.

If she is teaching and guiding you, how can you be on the wrong track, if a teacher provides the leadership? In any case, maybe you having asked will bring it onto a more right track. smile

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435463 06/25/15 01:04 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 759
I
Isabelle1949 Offline
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
I
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 759
Originally Posted by PamDD
Isabelle, I talked to my teacher within an hour of posting my questions. I got the sense that she was waiting for me to come to the conclusion that I was on the wrong track. As someone else said, I think teachers are a little uncertain how to handle adult students and I'm sure I gave some wrong signals about what I wanted to accomplish. Hmm... Still, I am a little encouraged.

I appreciate your input on the scales. Unfortunately, since I met with her before I saw your answer, I told her I thought that's what I needed to do, so I have a homework assignment to work on the C,G,D,A&E scales. However, at least I can put more effort into the pieces and their associated scales without over-practicing the individual scales.

Your comments about sight reading track right along with my teacher's. Also, it confirms what I thought might be correct, that is, look over the piece and look for patterns, etc.


Has your teacher included chords and inversions with the scales? How about cadences?
Chords and their inversions will help you with sight reading as you will recognize the look and feel of the chords and inversions. Forgive me if you know this already, but an inversion is a rearrangement of notes in a chord.

In C Major:
Root = CEG ( C being the lowest note)
LH 531 RH 135

1st Inversion = EGC
LH 531. RH 125

2nd Inversion = GCE
LH 521. RH 135

If you imagine lettered wooden blocks stacked on top of each other, and you take the bottom block out and put it on top, this is same as an inversion. If you do it to the next block on the bottom you have another inversion.

The teacher I studied with for years required students write out the chords and inversions on manuscript paper.


Always working to improve "Chopsticks". I'll never give up on it.
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: blackjack1777] #2435465 06/25/15 01:15 PM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,168
rocket88 Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,168
Originally Posted by blackjack1777

Have you considered getting a teacher that uses a method book? The great thing about a method book is that it moves you along at a structure and manageable pace and tries to cover all of the basic material that a new piano learner should be learning.


This is excellent advice.

I start all adult students with that, and augment it with a Hanon book for its scales and basic easy-to-grasp exercises, and a theory book, because method books are typically weak and incomplete in that area, and some people really enjoy digging in to theory.

After a few months, the student is playing simple pieces, has some hand and finger development, understands the concept of theory and knows some basic theory, and a bit of history.

Its like this teaches students to walk in a balanced way.

Now, where do you want to go?

If they want Classical, there are tons of easy Classical, and Classically-related exudes, such as Czerny.

Usually people do not know exactly what they want, nor do they know what is available for repertoire, be it Classical, Old Standards, Hymns, etc. So we can go in any direction they like, and usually it includes a mixture of styles.


Piano teacher.
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: rocket88] #2435486 06/25/15 02:24 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,893
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 12,893
Teaching children is straightforward - there are plenty of beginners' books for children, and everything essential gets covered, in a step-by-step way. The books make sure that the child doesn't run before he can walk, and doesn't walk before he can stand.

With adults, many teachers feel like they are threading on egg shells, feeling they must take the student's wishes into account. What the student wants (or thinks he wants), he gets. The result is that discouragement sets in when the student finds rudimentary skills lacking, things get half-learnt in a haphazard manner, and he keeps stumbling over obstacle after obstacle. Unfortunately, some adult beginner books seem to encourage this approach.

Things would be a lot easier if the adult learner is prepared to be taught the same way a child would be taught - from the basics onwards. I know an adult learner who started learning when he retired at 60. He's in fact very knowledgeable about classical music, having attended regular classical concerts from young (not just piano recitals either). But though he knew a lot of piano music even before he started lessons, he knew nothing about the rudiments of music. However, his teacher automatically assumed that as an adult, he wanted to get into playing 'songs' straightaway, and used an adult beginner's book at the first lesson which rode roughshod over the basics in favor of getting the student to play pseudo-pop stuff (single line melody RH, chords LH) very quickly.

My friend, however, informed the teacher that he wanted to learn everything from the beginning, and to learn piano playing via the classical music route. The teacher understood, and brought a different method book next lesson.

He's now playing his favorite Chopin nocturnes, but importantly, his technical and musical skills had all progressed alongside each other - his sight-reading is good, he has a good understanding of theory (and I don't just mean knowledge of standard chords), he has good aural skills; he can learn new pieces for himself from the score, without needing his teacher to point everything out to him, he has good hand and finger independence (and his LH is as good as his RH) - and importantly, he's enjoying his piano playing. And because he has been taught all the necessary skills, he can learn new stuff quickly without getting stalled by some technical problem (like difficulty with playing a scale or arpeggio passage evenly) or musical issues (like getting the right rhythm, playing in time, or even triplets).

His teacher told him that he wished all his adult students had the same attitude towards learning piano as him.......


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435487 06/25/15 02:27 PM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,129
Ataru074 Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 1,129
The first thing an adult should do is decide the level of commitment to invest in this lifelong endeavor of learning the piano.

For example, you are changing instrument, you already know keys, theory, your inner pulse is well developed and you can keep a steady rhythm... great, you can focus on the "fun" part.
You are totally green... well there is a lot of work to be done also away from the piano.

Let say you are green and you have only 30 to 45 minutes every day at the piano.

10 minutes scales / finger exercises with the metronome to build your pulse.
break a couple of minutes
10 minutes work on a very small chunk of an etude of the appropriate level
break of another couple of minutes
10/15 minutes of work on a very small chunk of a "performing piece"

and if you have extra time, take another break and work on a different piece.

Keep some time for reading some music theory, even a couple of pages every day and try to understand the concept more than memorize it. The more you know of what is "behind the scene" the easier the job at the piano it becomes.



Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: bennevis] #2435506 06/25/15 03:11 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,647
keystring Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 17,647
Originally Posted by bennevis
....With adults, many teachers feel like they are treading on egg shells, feeling they must take the student's wishes into account. What the student wants (or thinks he wants), he gets. The result is that discouragement sets in when the student finds rudimentary skills lacking, things get half-learnt in a haphazard manner, and he keeps stumbling over obstacle after obstacle. Unfortunately, some adult beginner books seem to encourage this approach

.........However, his teacher automatically assumed that as an adult, he wanted to get into playing 'songs' straightaway, and used an adult beginner's book at the first lesson which rode roughshod over the basics in favor of getting the student to play pseudo-pop stuff (single line melody RH, chords LH) very quickly.

My friend, however, informed the teacher that he wanted to learn everything from the beginning, and to learn piano playing via the classical music route. The teacher understood, and brought a different method book next lesson.

These two things belong together. We have the experience that teachers have with some adult students, which they then bring forward to all students they encounter. There can also be an assumption with no experience backing it up. Some of the "explanations" about "adult learners" do anything but help.

I'm glad that your friend was able to catch on and tell his teacher, in order to turn this around. I lost about four years of lessons on my first instrument to go with lessons, not knowing what was going on. You assume that if certain things need to be learned, and in a given order, to a given depth, that they will be taught. Added to this, there is often a great deference and trust toward the teacher, so that a student may not feel free to speak up. Yet many a teacher is in fact delighted to find that her student wants the real deal. The only worry remaining then is if the student will also follow through, and do so for long enough.

Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435605 06/25/15 07:22 PM
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
P
PamDD Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
P
Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 78
These are all such great comments. Keystring, I, too, have lost months because I didn't understand what should be taught. Should have come to this forum first! But I *think* I'm getting back on track.

Isabelle, yes she is teaching chords and inversions as a result of today's conversation.

Rocket, can you recommend a method book or a series? Should I lean toward the Alfred books? It's just hard to know where to start. UPDATE: I just read that Rachel Jiminez has a better method book for those wanting to learn classical. Alfred is better for chords but a lot of the songs are a little cheesy.

Thanks, all!

Last edited by PamDD; 06/25/15 07:55 PM.
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435671 06/26/15 03:02 AM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,206
R
rnaple Offline

Silver Supporter until April 24 2014
2000 Post Club Member
Offline

Silver Supporter until April 24 2014
2000 Post Club Member
R
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,206
The first chord Alfred's shows you is inverted. And Alfred's doesn't tell you that. My teacher told me. Alfred's is extremely popular. There are things in learning piano well that are left out.

What I've seen and heard from Rachael Himenez is very good.

There is also an online video teaching site. The two piano teachers appear very good. Artist Works

I'd also like to suggest one to look at. If it appeals to you, great. It isn't very popular. It is one I settled on. It fills in all the blanks. It's actually teaching non degreed people how to teach piano. One really should still have a teacher with this. I won't do an infomercial on it. I think personally, for myself, this is the best. I thoroughly enjoy it. Artistry Alliance


Ron
Your brain is a sponge. Keep it wet. Mary Gae George
The focus of your personal practice is discipline. Not numbers. Scott Sonnon
[Linked Image][Linked Image]
Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435717 06/26/15 08:00 AM
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 394
M
Medden Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
M
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 394
I agree with Bennevis, many teachers probably find it difficult teaching basics to adults. Mine is constantly telling me not to skim over the basics. It's hard, because they aren't as much fun as rushing headlong into something that sounds like music.

The biggest difference between us and kids, is we expect to see almost immediate results, and feel deflated when we don't.

Once you realise that learning is a slow and complex process, that there aren't any shortcuts or magic books, and that your progress will be almost glacially slow. Then you can start enjoying to learn it properly.

If you can record yourself playing the same piece once a week/month, and play back the first and the current one to really see your progress. In our own minds we often don't see the change, as it's so slow.

We get dissapointed when our expectations don't meet reality. By asking your teacher for a new approach, you are helping to improve the reality, and being on this forum is so helpful too, but I also think it will help if you lower your sights just a little and help your expectation meet reality half way.
Then you start feeling proud at every step you achieve, which helps encourage you further.

I hope I don't sound negative or disparaging. Don't give up! The journey is well worth all the effort, but just make sure you mentally pack for an expedition, not a day trip.


Re: What adult beginners should be learning [Re: PamDD] #2435719 06/26/15 08:01 AM
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 356
C
Celdor Offline
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 356
Originally Posted by PamDD
I'm discouraged. I'm making little progress. I'm with my second teacher in the last five months and still feel as though I'm being coached rather than taught. There isn't any logic behind the pieces that she or I select. We start with a couple of scales and then move on to three or four pieces we've both selected and are really a little too hard. My niece is an accomplished pianist. She said my focus should be on four things:

1. Playing scales--a lot!
2. Learning the major and associated minor scales
3. Rhythm (my teacher is good about emphasizing counting)
4. Sight reading since that's my goal

For example, should I concentrate on the CM and Am scales, it's associated chords, etc. and playing pieces in those keys before moving on to GM, etc.?

Any tips on how to practice sight reading?

What other things should my teacher be working with me on?

Finally, I'm thinking of just stopping the lessons for a while and just practicing the basics as discussed above.

Thoughts?



Don't lose your motivation. It's hard to plan what you should be learning when you are just a beginner. For that reason, we, adult students, usually get easily overwhelmed. Because of ambition and impatience, we tend to take too much and try to learn too quickly things which we are not supposed to at the beginning. I remember my first posts here asking about playing all scales in contrary motion, thirds etc. just having piano for couple of months.

Unfortunately, piano is IMO one of the hardest instruments. I used to play clarinet and I remember it was much easier to understand. Piano has that possibilities of playing multiple notes and you have two hands and five fingers to handle smile You can imagine how easy it is to get lost. As to chords, there is IMO infinite number of possibilities and without understanding basics, it is really hard to handle it and your motivation can be burnt very quickly.

I would ask your teacher, whoever it is or will be, to help you with a major plan, what you should work on. These are my suggestions:

  • understanding musical harmony starting from the beginning like C Maj including:
    • notes
    • intervals
    • chords - chords are spread on both staves so your teacher should help you with that
    • chords progression - this is how pieces progress; it could be difficult to be specific but there are a few standards, such as II, V, I
  • technical side of piano, taking appropriate exercises for your level to improve things like:
    • finger flexibility
    • evenness when play scales, arpeggios, chords etc.
    • while playing scales / arpeggios hands together, your teacher should monitor how well your hands are synchronized, evenness of notes in both hands
    • improve your dynamics e.g. piano, mezzo piano, mezzo forte, forte etc.
  • Sight Reading and by this I mean putting harmony into practice, how well can you recognize notes, intervals, chords etc. in pieces
  • in the end, your teacher should find pieces that are most representative to a particular problem you are working on.

This list is not exhausted but at least you can start with something. I am afraid in the end you have to work yourself and your teacher could only be helpful with most difficult problems. I would rather suggest to take simple steps, one thing a time a day. Think of what causes the major problems and discuss this with your teacher. Once, it's done, ask for another problems.

Hope it helps smile


Zbigniew

[Linked Image]
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Our January 2020 Newsletter Available Online Now...
Free Piano Newsletter
----------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Shop our Store for Music Lovers!
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Alicia Keys - Moonlight Sonata
by Pathetique1 - 02/25/20 03:09 AM
Int/Midi button on Kawai MP11
by giu - 02/25/20 02:56 AM
New bass strings sound hollow
by Emery Wang - 02/25/20 01:01 AM
About Yamaha cx
by Fer15 - 02/24/20 11:48 PM
grades of pieces
by Kaori Miyamoto - 02/24/20 05:40 PM
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics197,176
Posts2,929,692
Members96,104
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3