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Live recordings? Why of course.

Also, professionalism in the studio is also indicative of preparation in concert.

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Originally Posted by argerichfan
I have heard Argerich in concert twice (both times in London), and yes, there were a few finger slips, none fatal, and I wonder if they were even noticed by many in the audience.

OTH, her video of the Strauss Burleske (easily found on yt), appears to have no mistakes at all.

It is a notoriously awkward piece to bring off, and reportedly d'Albert was the first pianist to successfully negotiate it. Would love to have heard him play it, or anything else for that matter. His recording of the 1st movement of the Emperor is a rather a jumble, and there is no way it can be representative of d'Albert in his prime.


She plays well indeed:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4q_zSvns0QY

However, be aware that even "live" videos can have
their audio digitally edited, and sometimes studio
tracks are even recorded over the live tracks, to
enhance them, or even to replace them completely.

Not necessarily saying anything was altered in this video, but
you just never know for sure.

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Originally Posted by sirwormsalot
Live recordings? Why of course.

Also, professionalism in the studio is also indicative of preparation in concert.

Really??

Gould is the only pianist of the three who not only took a great interest in recording techniques, but also actively manipulated the edits (and even individual notes) etc to his heart's content. All his recordings bear evidence to that.

He stopped playing concerts in the 1960s. From then on, he confined himself to his recording studio.

How many live recordings of his have you heard?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
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The reason he killed himself prematurely I suspect is because he was such a perfectionist that he couldn't bare his technique failing him.

I have heard enough of his recordings to know that his technique, sense of timing and intellectual intensity make him unique. There are plenty of his live full-playthrough recordings on youtube, as well as recording sessions in the studio showing how he spliced parts together to achieve CD perfection.

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Originally Posted by sirwormsalot
recording sessions in the studio showing how he spliced parts together to achieve CD perfection.

Does CD perfection = pianistic perfection?


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
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A few missed notes a perfect pianist makes.

In other words, I do not judge people by the odd note slip, but by everything else combined.

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concert pianists make mistakes but are focused more on the message and meaning of the music rather than the notes themselves.

Of course, it is vitally important to do everything it says on the score, but that's only the entry fee in a way. Knowing how to interpret that and how to find the music inside it is where the art lies. Often it involves just not letting yourself get in the way of the piece.

Anyway, point is, you can still make a mistake, as it were, and be playing beautifully.


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skilled pianists can make mistakes and not lose their place because they have a deeper understanding of the structure of the music.

Compared to someone relying on muscle memory alone, this is where false starts begin to appear.

Also, you don't need to do everything that is on the score. Music is about conveying a message. Music evolved in tandem with our ability to perceive sounds and communicate with one another. To this end, a moment of music could be played beautifully slowly, or at allegretto speed and still maintain the attentions of listeners. Anyone who says the score must be followed to the print clearly hasn't studied the biological evolution of sound.

Gould was a genius for this very reason. He communicated new ways to explore music that had already been beaten to death and do it with conviction.

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Originally Posted by Scriabin67
Originally Posted by Damon
Originally Posted by pv88
Originally Posted by Plowboy
Only Michelangeli never made a mistake.


+1


Bah, check out 5:23 or thereabouts:




OPPS!! Blunder city!

But so What?

EVERYONE makes mistakes! We are not machines
or robots!



I didn't care that he made a mistake, I'm just tired of hearing people say he doesn't (or didn't, I suppose he's dead)

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The answer is simple. Touring concert pianists are the best pianists in the world. They're like the top athletes in pro sports. They have natural gifts that most normal people don't. On top of that this is their job and they spend years honing their craft. It's a combination of repetition, hard work, and natural ability that allow them to perform miracles on the piano.

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One thing to consider is the overall speed you are performing at. Do you sometimes try hurrying through a passage or piece? This creates all sort of problems. Just slow down and take it easy. Do you play with the music or by memory? Use the music! it isn't the end of the world! You may not even need to look at it anyway, but it is there!


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Originally Posted by Batuhan
i can't overcome my excitement


There is your problem. Concert pianists know how to keep their excitement or whatever other internal states from messing up their skill. It's all about self-knowledge and self-control.


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Originally Posted by wr
Originally Posted by Batuhan
i can't overcome my excitement


There is your problem. Concert pianists know how to keep their excitement or whatever other internal states from messing up their skill. It's all about self-knowledge and self-control.


Yeap. Just do it. Don't freak out.


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Originally Posted by Scriabin67


Not necessarily saying anything was altered in this video, but
you just never know for sure.

Point taken, but having watched this video many times, I cannot see that anything was altered.

Unlike her video of Rachmaninov 3 (a model of ineptitude, absolutely nauseating, Chailly gets more attention), with the Strauss one can actually see her hands in action. And that tells us a lot about her technique.


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Originally Posted by boo1234
The answer is simple. Touring concert pianists are the best pianists in the world. They're like the top athletes in pro sports. They have natural gifts that most normal people don't. On top of that this is their job and they spend years honing their craft. It's a combination of repetition, hard work, and natural ability that allow them to perform miracles on the piano.


I think that is true of some touring concert pianists, although there are pianists who are as good who do not care to tour, and some who tour but are not known as well as they should be, or only do limited touring. It takes a certain personality to tour, and not every artist is up to it. There are artists with the personality who are not necessarily among the best at their art, and there are artists who are among the best who lack the personality for touring.


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Originally Posted by argerichfan
Originally Posted by Scriabin67


Not necessarily saying anything was altered in this video, but
you just never know for sure.

Point taken, but having watched this video many times, I cannot see that anything was altered.

Unlike her video of Rachmaninov 3 (a model of ineptitude, absolutely nauseating, Chailly gets more attention), with the Strauss one can actually see her hands in action. And that tells us a lot about her technique.


Yes, but the camera view is not always on her hands,
and even if it was, you could STILL digitally alter
the audio alone, and if done well, the viewer may
still not notice!

I know, because I'm audio engineer as well as a piano player, and it's absolutely astounding what you can do in the digital realm these days.

I don't trust any "live" videos!




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Originally Posted by Batuhan
It's impossible for me to make no mistakes during a performance

I think it is great that you're so honest, Batuhan. Join the club. I've read through this thread with great interest. I can only recall one performance as an adult when I didn't screw up audibly at least once. I only recently started performing again after lots of years and in my first live solo performance in almost 30 years last Sunday - the Beethoven Op. 126 - I made mistakes where I had never ever made them before. I wasn't nervous and in normal circumstances I could play the music in my sleep, but I still sucked. Then my teacher today said I needed to work on posture and projecting melodic lines and dynamic gradation, and some other stuff; nothing about the mistakes. I am taking a huge risk in posting the link below because it's a crappy recording in a venue with crappy acoustics and it is far from my best work. But it may be somewhat useful to others as a modest example of how one can cope with mistakes and make it seem like everything's fine. I even had people who know this music well come to me afterwards saying it was a great performance! Go figure.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jC01qveADxk

Oh, I meant to say, Batuhan, if you can identify the big mistakes in this performance and grade them on an egregiousness scale of 1 - 10, I should be much obliged. Actually, that applies to anyone who wants to participate. Of course you all have access to the texts but that's ok. Competition open!! IMO there are four.

Last edited by SiFi; 05/21/15 01:11 AM.

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Big ones, I mean.


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Originally Posted by jdw
Perfection is a myth, and a harmful one.


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