Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
What's Hot!!
PIANO TEACHERS Please read this!
-------------------
European Tour for Piano Lovers
JOIN US FOR THE TOUR!
--------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

Who's Online Now
83 registered members (Anticlock, 15shoes, akressevich, Artur Gajewski, Bett, anotherscott, A Guy, Beowulf, 23 invisible), 1,060 guests, and 4 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 2 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305706
07/23/14 12:11 AM
07/23/14 12:11 AM
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 971
P
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member
Paul678  Offline
500 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 971
If Lang Lang fails to prop up the piano industry in the future, which
he apparently has at the moment, and not just in China, then you'll
see more musicians like me doing DIY work, especially the basics like tuning.

Agreed with Turandot: Trust your own ears!

Piano & Music Gifts & Accessories (570)
Piano accessories and music gift items
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305746
07/23/14 02:44 AM
07/23/14 02:44 AM
Joined: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,365
B
BornInTheUSA Offline
1000 Post Club Member
BornInTheUSA  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,365
Originally Posted by Markarian


Myself, I am more influenced by film music and more adult contemporary stuff like Yanni, Jim Brickman, and David Lanz. My dream is to write for film and I've already scored a couple of indie shorts.


Well, that's the problem. Millennial's aren't listening to Yanni, David Lanz, or Kenny G. Maybe their [grand] parents.



Last edited by michaelha; 07/23/14 02:44 AM.
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Paul678] #2305749
07/23/14 02:58 AM
07/23/14 02:58 AM
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 5,794
Reseda, California
J
JohnSprung Offline
Unobtanium Subscriber
JohnSprung  Offline
Unobtanium Subscriber
J

Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 5,794
Reseda, California
Originally Posted by Paul678
... you'll see more musicians like me doing DIY work, especially the basics like tuning.

Agreed with Turandot: Trust your own ears!


I do some regulation and repair, but tuning is something I wouldn't risk trying to DIY. It's just too easy to get bored and get on the wrong pin and break string.



-- J.S.

[Linked Image] [Linked Image]

Knabe Grand # 10927
Yamaha CP33
Kawai FS690
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305754
07/23/14 04:02 AM
07/23/14 04:02 AM
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,152
The Netherlands
W
WimPiano Offline
2000 Post Club Member
WimPiano  Offline
2000 Post Club Member
W

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,152
The Netherlands
Come on guys.. this is so lame..
There has never been a big public for classical or at least serious (good) music. Ok, there where some hypes but no, the common man never went to conservatory. In reality a lot of music before NOW was crap, also in the 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's.

And yes, there's plenty of young people "Millenials" (who invents these words, seriously?) who know quite a bit of music and play it using real instruments.

Just a couple of weeks ago there was a little concert during lunch in our company restaurant by students part of the VU (university) Orchestra in Amsterdam. Those were not people actually studying music for a career, they play it because they like it. And yes there were hipsters including the beards among them.

It was fun, the average age of the public was around 35-40 meaning it also included quite some younger people. They played Schubert and so on.

Every generation thinks they're better than the generation after them.
Always the melancholy: Oh this is lost.. oh that is lost, oh this was better, oh that was better.. Give me a break..


Last edited by wimpiano; 07/23/14 05:29 AM.
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: JohnSprung] #2305756
07/23/14 04:18 AM
07/23/14 04:18 AM
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 971
P
Paul678 Offline
500 Post Club Member
Paul678  Offline
500 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 971
Originally Posted by JohnSprung
[

I do some regulation and repair, but tuning is something I wouldn't risk trying to DIY. It's just too easy to get bored and get on the wrong pin and break string.



Get Tunelab Pro, and it's pretty easy to tune your own piano, once you get the hang of using the hammer and setting the pins, so your tuning is stable.

If you have a reasonably young piano, with young strings, you probably won't break a string if you are careful. It does happen, but then you should learn to replace strings anyways.....

thumb

Last edited by Paul678; 07/23/14 04:30 AM.
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: WimPiano] #2305784
07/23/14 06:44 AM
07/23/14 06:44 AM
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 652
Saskatchewan, Canada
G
gsmonks Offline
500 Post Club Member
gsmonks  Offline
500 Post Club Member
G

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 652
Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted by wimpiano
Come on guys.. this is so lame..
There has never been a big public for classical or at least serious (good) music. Ok, there where some hypes but no, the common man never went to conservatory. In reality a lot of music before NOW was crap, also in the 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's.

And yes, there's plenty of young people "Millenials" (who invents these words, seriously?) who know quite a bit of music and play it using real instruments.

Just a couple of weeks ago there was a little concert during lunch in our company restaurant by students part of the VU (university) Orchestra in Amsterdam. Those were not people actually studying music for a career, they play it because they like it. And yes there were hipsters including the beards among them.

It was fun, the average age of the public was around 35-40 meaning it also included quite some younger people. They played Schubert and so on.

Every generation thinks they're better than the generation after them.
Always the melancholy: Oh this is lost.. oh that is lost, oh this was better, oh that was better.. Give me a break..


That's not the issue here. The issue is the lack of jobs for working musicians. Each city used to have dozens, in some instances hundreds of clubs featuring live music. Today they're all gone. I can easily name 50 cities where I used to play that today have not one regular live venue, for ANY kind of music.

I have friends in Vancouver, Victoria, New York City, Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Amsterdam, Montreal, Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Boston, Seattle, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, NONE of whom are working as full-time professional musicians any more. The clubs are all closed, gone out of business, the whole entire scene is kaputsky.

It's usually cyclical, but this time it's different. In the 70's, brass musicians were running all over North America like chickens with their heads cut off, chasing rumours of work. When it finally dawned on them that there wasn't any, they settled where they were, hung out their shingle, and taught for a living. That's why in the late 60's, early 70's, I had trumpet teachers like Bobby Hilton, Bobby Herriot, Joe de Bruyker, Len Whitely, and so on. The only reason I had them as teachers was because there was no place for them to play any more.

At that time, the bar band thing took over and replaced the dance and club thing.

But this time, the bar band scene has come to an end with NOTHING to replace it. THAT's the difference. It's not that things have changed this time. It's that the scene itself is gone.

The kids coming along aren't playing live venues. They're making videos.

The computer/video/Interweb scene is sucking the life out of both live music and the television industry. Television itself is on the way out. There are times when our local television stations are putting on public-service commercials because there are no paid ads to fill those slots.

The Interweb is the last big venue, and it is anathema to live ANYthing.

Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305787
07/23/14 06:54 AM
07/23/14 06:54 AM
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,152
The Netherlands
W
WimPiano Offline
2000 Post Club Member
WimPiano  Offline
2000 Post Club Member
W

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,152
The Netherlands
I agree in that respect that the working musician is replaced by a DJ.

Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305835
07/23/14 08:52 AM
07/23/14 08:52 AM
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 12,105
Georgia, USA
Rickster Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Rickster  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 12,105
Georgia, USA
Originally Posted by wimpiano
I agree in that respect that the working musician is replaced by a DJ.

This may be a little OT, but on occasion I will get invited to play the piano for an event at the small community college where I work; not that I'm all that good on the piano, but what little I can play is legible to an extent (people can recognize the song/tune).

I get a lot of comments from the audience that they enjoyed my playing and that I was good on the piano. Fact is, I'm not really all that good on the piano, but the audience is not used to hearing someone playing live music at an event, as a general rule. So, although my playing is mediocre at best, they still find it somewhat entertaining and enjoyable.

Where is the new blood? My 10 year old granddaughter is taking piano lessons (though not from me smile ) and there will always be an interest in the piano in particular and the arts in general.

Rick


Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305844
07/23/14 09:05 AM
07/23/14 09:05 AM
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 4,983
Seattle, WA USA
E
Ed McMorrow, RPT Offline
4000 Post Club Member
Ed McMorrow, RPT  Offline
4000 Post Club Member
E

Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 4,983
Seattle, WA USA
There are young people starting careers in piano service in the USA. Probably enough to meet demand for some time. But probably not if everybody with a serviceable grand piano gets it tuned twice a year.

We are seeing a reduction in piano service support at most universities and colleges. There are signs of price competition among service providers. That should tell you something about the demand/supply curve.


In a seemingly infinite universe-infinite human creativity is-seemingly possible.
According to NASA, 93% of the earth like planets possible in the known universe have yet to be formed.
Contact: Ed@LightHammerpiano.com
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Steve Cohen] #2305846
07/23/14 09:10 AM
07/23/14 09:10 AM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 10,966
Williamsburg, VA
Piano*Dad Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Piano*Dad  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 10,966
Williamsburg, VA
Originally Posted by Steve Cohen
Originally Posted by Piano*Dad
My tech is around my age, so I'm probably OK for a while. grin


I didn't think techs kept working beyond their 80s.


Payback ….. is …….. coming.

.
.
.
.

grin

Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: gsmonks] #2305847
07/23/14 09:11 AM
07/23/14 09:11 AM
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 274
USA
BrainCramp Offline
Full Member
BrainCramp  Offline
Full Member

Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 274
USA
Markarian, some of what you're seeing is simply demographics in the US. It crosses many occupations and industries. The baby boomers are a big population, and for a variety of reasons they aren't retiring at the age and in the numbers that earlier generations did.

Originally Posted by gsmonks
The classical music scene croaked at the same time as the avante garde jazz scene, in circa 1963. By the early 70's, all the big-name composers had died off, and as in the jazz world, there simply was no new generation to take over.

This isn't to say that no one is writing jazz and classical any longer- they are. But they're a generation of wannabees and wankers who aren't breaking any new ground, aren't doing anything original, and are more taxidermists and weekend-warriors than real musicians.

gsmonks, it sounds like you don't know anything about classical music.

Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305875
07/23/14 09:50 AM
07/23/14 09:50 AM
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 513
Idaho
Beacon Chris Offline
500 Post Club Member
Beacon Chris  Offline
500 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 513
Idaho
I can only speak as a classical guy, but the big change I've seen is with commercially recorded music. Now that everything is shared on youtube, there's absolutely no reason to buy recorded music (I'm not saying this is right - it's just the way it is). However, the great opportunity as I see it is to use youtube as a promotion vehicle for live performance. My impression is that the demand for live performance is just as solid as it's ever been with young people driving the trend. I think the trick is giving the audience something that has both quality and originality - even with the trusted war-horses of music.

Only my opinion - I hope I'm right!

BC


Musician, Singer, Teacher, Humorist, Dad...

β€œI have an inferiority complex, but it’s not a very good one.”
― Steven Wright
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: gsmonks] #2305929
07/23/14 11:37 AM
07/23/14 11:37 AM
Joined: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,365
B
BornInTheUSA Offline
1000 Post Club Member
BornInTheUSA  Offline
1000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Jun 2013
Posts: 1,365
Originally Posted by gsmonks

That's not the issue here. The issue is the lack of jobs for working musicians. Each city used to have dozens, in some instances hundreds of clubs featuring live music. Today they're all gone. I can easily name 50 cities where I used to play that today have not one regular live venue, for ANY kind of music.

I have friends in Vancouver, Victoria, New York City, Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, Amsterdam, Montreal, Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Boston, Seattle, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, NONE of whom are working as full-time professional musicians any more. The clubs are all closed, gone out of business, the whole entire scene is kaputsky.

It's usually cyclical, but this time it's different. In the 70's, brass musicians were running all over North America like chickens with their heads cut off, chasing rumours of work. When it finally dawned on them that there wasn't any, they settled where they were, hung out their shingle, and taught for a living. That's why in the late 60's, early 70's, I had trumpet teachers like Bobby Hilton, Bobby Herriot, Joe de Bruyker, Len Whitely, and so on. The only reason I had them as teachers was because there was no place for them to play any more.

At that time, the bar band thing took over and replaced the dance and club thing.

But this time, the bar band scene has come to an end with NOTHING to replace it. THAT's the difference. It's not that things have changed this time. It's that the scene itself is gone.

The kids coming along aren't playing live venues. They're making videos.

The computer/video/Interweb scene is sucking the life out of both live music and the television industry. Television itself is on the way out. There are times when our local television stations are putting on public-service commercials because there are no paid ads to fill those slots.

The Interweb is the last big venue, and it is anathema to live ANYthing.


I don't know if there are less opportunities today for musicians then 20 years ago, but you can't say the system is broken because it's changed and you've stayed the same. "Making videos" - you mean YouTube, is a wonderful medium and those who know how to leverage it have created opportunities for themselves that probably wouldn't have been possible without it. There are many "YouTube Stars" that I know of, some I follow. Kyle Landry as an example, Sal Kahn (not a musician though), Hiromi Uehara I believe also got a lot of great exposure through YouTube. Even Rickster here seems to have a good following on YouTube, and I'm guessing he was born after 1980 and doesn't qualify as a millennial (if I'm wrong, please forgive me).

The bar band, EDM, these are all evolutions of music. They're not any less, though some will disagree.

The Internet is sucking the life out of those who refuse to adapt and learn new things. Everyone can make YouTube videos these days, even on your iPhone. Give it a try, maybe you'll get 300,000 views and be the next Justin Beieber!


Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305962
07/23/14 12:23 PM
07/23/14 12:23 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 12,105
Georgia, USA
Rickster Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
Rickster  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member

Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 12,105
Georgia, USA
Originally Posted by Michaelha
The Internet is sucking the life out of those who refuse to adapt and learn new things. Everyone can make YouTube videos these days, even on your iPhone. Give it a try, maybe you'll get 300,000 views and be the next Justin Beieber!

Well, I'll never be a Justin Beiber, but one of my YouTube music videos has over 650,000 views! smile

It has certainly surprised the heck out of me...

Just goes to show that entertainment and musical proficiency are not the same thing. (Musically proficient I'm not smile )

Rick


Piano enthusiast and amateur musician: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated". Yamaha C7. YouTube Channel
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305966
07/23/14 12:29 PM
07/23/14 12:29 PM
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,341
Seattle Area
M
Markarian Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
Markarian  Offline OP
1000 Post Club Member
M

Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,341
Seattle Area
Okay, a couple of things:

First off, I'm one of those kids making videos. I have one original song with 20,000 views. Not really much to brag about if you consider some more popular musicians out there, but still I think more people than I will ever meet in my lifetime. The song was even translated into Russian and performed live in Russia.

Which brings me to my next point, gsmonks. I have almost zero interest in live performance. I do not feel confident in my ability to play consistently enough for it to be worth the stress. There is a live music scene, at least in Seattle, I've been invited to many gigs, but have turned them down because I have confidence problems. I'm comfortable sitting in front of my workstation with a MIDI controller and Kontakt open, or playing my Steinway at 3AM with only the neighbors and my partner as my audience. Even with acoustic panels, the former have said they can hear the piano clear as day. Luckily, they have expressed enjoyment, rather than annoyance. Let's see how long that lasts.

I do lament that all those big bands of the 30s and 40s are gone. I adore that sound and yes, you have now met the former 28 year old who at one point played "40s on 4" and "Cinemagic" XM channels constantly in his car on the way to class.

As for demographics and terminology, the people who come up with these terms are marketing gurus, who write books on how to sell to a particular group of people. "Millennials" or "Echo Boomers" or "Generation Y" are generally considered those born between 1980 and 1994, depending on who you ask. Some of us caught a glimpse of the Berlin Wall falling down and all of us are old enough to remember 9/11. We were raised on the Internet, have an unshakable sense of entitlement, and we are searching for authenticity in an artificial world, whatever the crap that means.

The point of this thread is not to ask for help, not to complain. I did NOT want my piano buying experience to be a journey, but that seems to be the expectation here, something to aspire to. I just wanted a F-ing piano that fit my needs and I think I found it and can hopefully get back to my life. The point of this thread is to express concern that every piano industry person I have encountered, both in sales and service, are many years older than I and it makes me worry that I will not have sufficient resources to support my instrument as I go forward as a musician.





2012 NY Steinway Model B | Kawai MP11 | Nord Stage 3 Compact | Moog Sub 37 | Behringer DeepMind 12 | Sequential Circuits Prophet 6 | Korg Prologue
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305975
07/23/14 12:52 PM
07/23/14 12:52 PM
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 7,439
Rochester MN
Minnesota Marty Offline

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014
Minnesota Marty  Offline

Platinum Supporter until October 5 2014


Joined: May 2012
Posts: 7,439
Rochester MN
Reading many of these threads has become a safari, rather than a journey.

wink


Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Paul678] #2305981
07/23/14 01:12 PM
07/23/14 01:12 PM
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 5,794
Reseda, California
J
JohnSprung Offline
Unobtanium Subscriber
JohnSprung  Offline
Unobtanium Subscriber
J

Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 5,794
Reseda, California
I have a 1929 Knabe 9 ft. grand. It has small diameter wire wound strings fairly far up the scale, and if I break one, it would be a special order, and it might not sound exactly like the rest.



-- J.S.

[Linked Image] [Linked Image]

Knabe Grand # 10927
Yamaha CP33
Kawai FS690
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Markarian] #2305994
07/23/14 01:27 PM
07/23/14 01:27 PM
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,439
torrance, CA
turandot Offline
7000 Post Club Member
turandot  Offline
7000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,439
torrance, CA
Originally Posted by Markarian

I did NOT want my piano buying experience to be a journey, but that seems to be the expectation here, something to aspire to. I just wanted a F-ing piano that fit my needs and I think I found it and can hopefully get back to my life.


Now, them is words I can understand. cool

Quote
The point of this thread is to express concern that every piano industry person I have encountered, both in sales and service, are many years older than I and it makes me worry that I will not have sufficient resources to support my instrument as I go forward as a musician.


The resources you will need to support your instrument consist of one skilled and honest technician and a fallback position if that individual is indisposed. At least in my neighborhood there are many popular techs under 50. One thing you should take into account though is that as piano ownership continues to decline, top-notch tech services will continue to increase in pricee.

Heaven forbid that you will need industry people of the sales variety to support your craft. The only thing they can possibly do for you is convince you that your current instrument falls short of your talent and that you need an upgrade. First-time buyers of brand new pianos are so scarce that selling upgrade fever is essential to keeping things going.

The reason that you encounter so many mentally and physically old and fatigued individuals in sales is that like most industries on the decline, the piano industry fears unconventional thinking. That is true at the manufacturing level, the marketing level, the distribution level, and the retail level. Fear of change seems perverse when you consider how badly the industry has slipped, but even at the higher levels, individuals who have failed elsewhere are recycled into new positions. A distributor may leave one company in shambles, only to be re-incarnated at another. Salesmen of the 'closer' variety whose approach to selling is a complee disconnect for current consumer behavior wander from dealership to dealership trying to recreate the world of fat commissions they knew 20 or 30 years ago.

The reason for the many inquiries here about piano quests is that the majority of members here are into classical music and many of those classically-inclined members are at least as much into the instrument as the music one can make on it. They equate the perfect piano to the Holy Grail that the Crusdaers wee supposedly questing after. Some actually become footsoldiers of particular retailers carrying their banners from thread to thread. On top of all that there are a disproportinate number of AWMB's in residence here. Hence the romantic quest, journey, adventure stuff.

What the hey? In the end they get their pianos and live happily ever after at least until the upgrade itch starts. Most of the real Crusaders had less pleasant outcomes to their quest.


Will Johnny Come Marching Home?
The fate of the modern wartime soldier
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: turandot] #2306004
07/23/14 01:44 PM
07/23/14 01:44 PM
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,902
SoCal
Plowboy Offline

2000 Post Club Member
Plowboy  Offline

2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,902
SoCal
Originally Posted by turandot
AWMB

What's that??

Anyway, your remarks on piano buying are spot on. I've learned the hard way. Heraclitus said you can't step into the same river twice. Similarly, you can't play the same piano twice. Yeah, you can check to make sure the serial number is the same, but the piano you buy at the shop will not be the piano that shows up at your house. Nor will it be the piano you play the next day. Pianos are organic. They are in a state of constant change. Find a good one that you can afford, stop analyzing and hand wringing and buy it.


Gary
Essex EUP-111 at the mountains
W. Hoffmann T-122 at the beach
Re: Where is the new blood? [Re: Plowboy] #2306014
07/23/14 02:12 PM
07/23/14 02:12 PM
Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 546
Chicago
I
iLaw Offline
500 Post Club Member
iLaw  Offline
500 Post Club Member
I

Joined: Jan 2010
Posts: 546
Chicago
Originally Posted by Plowboy

... Find a good one that you can afford, stop analyzing and hand wringing and buy it.


... then start practicing.

A great performance on an old Story & Clark beats a ham-fisted performance on a Steingraeber E-272 every time.

Larry.

Page 2 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  Ken Knapp, Piano World 

(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Petrof
(ad)
Sweetwater - Keyboards
Sweetwater
ad
Jazz Piano Online
Jazz Piano Lessons Online

New Topics - Multiple Forums
Need Roland HP170 service manual/schematic
by btsui. 01/15/19 11:15 PM
Discord Online Jamming Central server looking for pianists
by Tyrone Slothrop. 01/15/19 11:02 PM
NU1X white noise?
by Eienkei. 01/15/19 10:51 PM
What keyboard should I get???
by jbear876. 01/15/19 08:42 PM
Classical Pianist Lola Astanova in Rolling Stones magazine
by Tyrone Slothrop. 01/15/19 08:42 PM
Forum Statistics
Forums40
Topics189,590
Posts2,782,169
Members92,114
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Please Support Our Advertisers
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

Sweetwater

PianoTeq Petrof
Piano Buyer Spring 2018
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2018 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.2