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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2246898
03/15/14 09:30 AM
03/15/14 09:30 AM
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Rochester MN
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Well, I have to disagree.

I can find no historical reference that piano builders, from Cristofori on, had any intention of emulating the sounds or tonalities of orchestral instruments. This is a concept which is being applied to the development of the piano in hindsight. During the mid 19th century, the period when the 'modern' piano was developing, the sole aim was to develop the concept of the piano as an instrument, and not to make it sound like something else.

The piano is not derivative of the pipe organ. It is the descendent of both the harpsichord and clavichord. To equate, or even imply, that the tonal structure of the piano has the variation of an orchestra is merely wishful thinking. It can, indeed, have great variation of tonal structure within the physical constraints of a hammer striking a string. It has no reeds, no buzzing lips, no plucked or bowed strings, nor any of the accessories to alter the tonalities of instruments which employ those methods of sound production. The piano is a tuned percussion instrument. It is merely a member of a family of instruments which can be added to an ensemble, only one of which is called an orchestra.

It is unfortunate that a very simple question posed by Almaviva has been over analyzed. I still maintain that using the term "orchestral" in reference to the tonal structure of a piano is wishful marketing hype. Hyperbole abounds in the hands of the marketing departments.

Have you ever heard a piano performance of Petroushka to come anywhere close to the tonal variety of the original? Though it is now popular, is any justice done to The Rite of Spring in a piano transcription?


Marty in Minnesota

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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2246932
03/15/14 11:00 AM
03/15/14 11:00 AM
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This concept is a widely known element of voicing and establishing a tonal goal for an instrument. Because voicing is primarily an aural learning process and an oral tradition very little has been written about how voicers think about what they do. There is plenty of evidence in extant instruments, and in the US, Asian and Europe voicers copy voicing done by their predecessor.

The remnants of this tradition is still evident in the una corda pedal and the regulation. Many manufacturers and technicians have their own opinions about how that should be regulated. Should the shift go so far as to eliminate the striking of one string actually giving simply less volume? Or should it go over enough to have the hammer strike a different part of the hammer on three strings creating a color/timbre change. I can tell you that from working with pianists that most of them expect a color change in addition to a slight volume change. Almost every manufacturer has a tonal aesthetic that applies to that question and therefore the protocol varies with manufacturer.

Evidence for this tradition can easily be found on many American pianos from the early 19th century where pianos had many pedals to create different tonal qualities. The piano was actually developed originally from the hammer dulcimer, (neither the organ or harpsichord) with the common element being the keyboard. Even the hammer dulcimer was played with varying types of hammers/mallets to change the tone.

An orchestrally voiced piano as opposed to a homogeneously voiced instrument can have a clear clean bass or aggressively voiced bass. The tenor can have a variety of sounds ranging from a sweet lute like quality or one that matches an aggressively voiced bass area. The top of the bass section can round out and be more like the lower tenor. The treble can be a bell like quality or more aggressive brightness. All of this is of course dependent on the scale design and hammer type and the tonal goals of the manufacturer or customer.

The difference in the tenor area and the treble, which should gradually glide seamlessly up the scale, helps the pianist bring out middle voices in complex repertoire.

An additional quality of this type of voicing is that the timbre should change gradually as the key is struck a little bit harder in addition to the change in volume. This is usually described as tone color.

So I can assure you that this is not marketing hype but an attempt from the manufacturer to describe the tonal quality that they are striving to achieve.


Sally Phillips
Owner/ Technician
Piano Perfect, LLC
Steinway & Sons Pianos
Columbus, GA
New Steinway, Boston and Essex pianos
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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2246941
03/15/14 11:17 AM
03/15/14 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Sally Phillips
This concept is a widely known element of voicing and establishing a tonal goal for an instrument. Because voicing is primarily an aural learning process and an oral tradition very little has been written about how voicers think about what they do. There is plenty of evidence in extant instruments, and in the US, Asian and Europe voicers copy voicing done by their predecessor.

The remnants of this tradition is still evident in the una corda pedal and the regulation. Many manufacturers and technicians have their own opinions about how that should be regulated. Should the shift go so far as to eliminate the striking of one string actually giving simply less volume? Or should it go over enough to have the hammer strike a different part of the hammer on three strings creating a color/timbre change. I can tell you that from working with pianists that most of them expect a color change in addition to a slight volume change. Almost every manufacturer has a tonal aesthetic that applies to that question and therefore the protocol varies with manufacturer.

Evidence for this tradition can easily be found on many American pianos from the early 19th century where pianos had many pedals to create different tonal qualities. The piano was actually developed originally from the hammer dulcimer, (neither the organ or harpsichord) with the common element being the keyboard. Even the hammer dulcimer was played with varying types of hammers/mallets to change the tone.

An orchestrally voiced piano as opposed to a homogeneously voiced instrument can have a clear clean bass or aggressively voiced bass. The tenor can have a variety of sounds ranging from a sweet lute like quality or one that matches an aggressively voiced bass area. The top of the bass section can round out and be more like the lower tenor. The treble can be a bell like quality or more aggressive brightness. All of this is of course dependent on the scale design and hammer type and the tonal goals of the manufacturer or customer.

The difference in the tenor area and the treble, which should gradually glide seamlessly up the scale, helps the pianist bring out middle voices in complex repertoire.

An additional quality of this type of voicing is that the timbre should change gradually as the key is struck a little bit harder in addition to the change in volume. This is usually described as tone color.

So I can assure you that this is not marketing hype but an attempt from the manufacturer to describe the tonal quality that they are striving to achieve.

Thanks for this most excellent dissertation, Sally!

Have you written your book yet? smile

Rick


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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2246942
03/15/14 11:17 AM
03/15/14 11:17 AM
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Ed McMorrow, RPT Online content
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The first sizable body of piano music was written by Domenico Scarlatti. Most of Christofori's pianos went to the courts of Spain and Portugal where Scarlatti spent some time. Mozart and his contemporaries brought the piano into public concert. Performing on piano became a "business" then. Salable to the new growing middle classes.

The most popular pianists played in an "Operatic" style. Opera being the Ne Plus Ultra of the music performing business. Transcriptions of Opera were played in concert by pianists.

Thus producing a "singing" tone was demanded by audiences and pianists alike.

Piano makers responded by a huge variety of means to try to meet this market demand.

Piano tone is really all about giving the pianists the tools to shape all the phrases in a way that makes them compelling to listen to.

I suspect early humans sang before they talked. Because the singing voice will project over distance better than the shouted voice. Having members of a tribe that could project their voices would have helped in any number of conditions early humans faced.

Orchestral instrumentalist often speak of wanting to sing with their instrument also.

I think the term "Orchestral" voicing is meaningless. Bechstein could chime in and explain.

Last edited by Ed McMorrow, RPT; 03/15/14 04:08 PM.

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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Ed McMorrow, RPT] #2246949
03/15/14 11:27 AM
03/15/14 11:27 AM
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Rochester MN
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Originally Posted by Ed McMorrow, RPT
I think the term "Orchestral" voicing is meaningless. Bechstein could chime in and explain.

And this is what I have maintained throughout this thread!


Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2246968
03/15/14 12:04 PM
03/15/14 12:04 PM
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The orchestral voicing description, as I said above, is simply a description of a type of voicing done to achieve a specific tonal goal. It's a common term used primarily in Europe among manufacturers and technicians that is not often referred to in those terms here in the US. It may be unfamiliar but I assure that it has meaning to those who use it.


Sally Phillips
Owner/ Technician
Piano Perfect, LLC
Steinway & Sons Pianos
Columbus, GA
New Steinway, Boston and Essex pianos
www.steinwaypiano.com
Acoustic Piano Technical Consultant - Acoustic and Digital Piano Buyer
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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: S. Phillips] #2247036
03/15/14 02:19 PM
03/15/14 02:19 PM
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Thank you all for your posts. It's been very informative and very entertaining.

One follow-up question, please. If what Bechstein means by "orchestral voicing" is that each register of the piano has a distinct tonal quality that can change subtly again with different dynamic levels, how can Bechstein maintain that "customers who do not explore this feature of tonal design often prematurely assume that the piano is voiced too bright for the American musical taste."

Inter-register tonal variety does not necessarily equate to brightness. The registers can be voiced to either dark or bright timbres. So what is Bechstein talking about?


P.S. - It doesn't just apply to pianos, either. Enrico Caruso and Placido Domingo were both tenors, but there was a dark timbre to both of their voices. Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau was a baritone, but his voice had a tenorish coloring to it, a quality that became more apparent in his fifties.

Last edited by Almaviva; 03/15/14 03:14 PM.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: S. Phillips] #2247037
03/15/14 02:21 PM
03/15/14 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by S. Phillips


The remnants of this tradition is still evident in the una corda pedal and the regulation. Many manufacturers and technicians have their own opinions about how that should be regulated. Should the shift go so far as to eliminate the striking of one string actually giving simply less volume? Or should it go over enough to have the hammer strike a different part of the hammer on three strings creating a color/timbre change. I can tell you that from working with pianists that most of them expect a color change in addition to a slight volume change.


Just a quick comment here. Hitting 2 strings rather than 3, even with magically identical hammer felt density, changes the color, even at the same volume. So, if you strike the key slightly harder with the una corda engaged to match the volume of the note struck without the una corda engaged, assuming you are now only hitting 2 rather than 3 strings, you get a different color at the same volume. Depending on the piano, there should be more of a color change when the una corda is engaged, hitting 2 strings rather than 3, at a lower volume.
Whether the Una Corda is set up to completely clear a string or not, you also get a color change from the different part of the hammer felt hitting. That different part of the hammer felt will have been played in ( probably less ) differently and also voiced differently ( this is a big should since it is often not addressed ) and will produce a different color.
If the Una Corda is set up to completely clear a string, the pianist still has the option to not fully engage the pedal and move the keyboard over to the point they prefer. Granted, most pianists use pedals as on or off, but that is their choice ( or lack of awareness ) to not explore what sounds are available.


Keith D Kerman
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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247087
03/15/14 04:34 PM
03/15/14 04:34 PM
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Most newer era pianos that are regulated so the shift pedal does not clear the hammers from one of the unison strings will sound ugly in the treble if you increase the shift motion to clear the third string. This is because the hammer felt is so dense that the end grain felt on the side of the hammer is brighter than the face of the felt.

If you have a softer, lighter hammer such as older Steinways and other makers used you can clear the third string and not get uglies.

Having one unison string un-struck allows the un-struck string to function as a passive coupler. It will be moving 180 degrees out of phase with the struck strings. (This means that when the struck strings are moving in the up direction, the un-struck string will be moving in the down direction and the un-struck string doesn't begin to move until the struck strings are already in motion).

This changes the impedance of the soundboard/bridge structure.

The effect is that some of the impact of the hammer is imparted to the un-struck string and this lessens the striking volume but since the unison contains a 180 degree anti-phase motion the sustain, (duration, I know BDB), is about the same as if you struck all three in phase with the same force blow.

I love piano music performed on a piano with properly tone-regulated, third-string clearing shift pedal by a pianist who understands how to use it.



In a seemingly infinite universe-infinite human creativity is-seemingly possible.
According to NASA, 93% of the earth like planets possible in the known universe have yet to be formed.
Contact: Ed@LightHammerpiano.com
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: PaintedPostDave] #2247135
03/15/14 06:08 PM
03/15/14 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by PaintedPostDave
A less elegant and beautiful discussion might try to quantify “orchestral voicing” by using metrics like the cumulative line spectrum map, the spectral centroid map, the cumulative difference of spectral centroids and, finally, the cumulative difference of two cumulative line spectrum maps; but there is no elegance or beauty there - just a lot of work.

I do find that fascinating though......a different way of looking at the same thing. The more ways you have to look at something, the better understanding you have of the topic.

Like the blind men and the elephant.


Poetry is rhythm
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247159
03/15/14 06:56 PM
03/15/14 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Almaviva
Thank you all for your posts. It's been very informative and very entertaining.

One follow-up question, please. If what Bechstein means by "orchestral voicing" is that each register of the piano has a distinct tonal quality that can change subtly again with different dynamic levels, how can Bechstein maintain that "customers who do not explore this feature of tonal design often prematurely assume that the piano is voiced too bright for the American musical taste."

Inter-register tonal variety does not necessarily equate to brightness. The registers can be voiced to either dark or bright timbres. So what is Bechstein talking about?


P.S. - It doesn't just apply to pianos, either. Enrico Caruso and Placido Domingo were both tenors, but there was a dark timbre to both of their voices. Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau was a baritone, but his voice had a tenorish coloring to it, a quality that became more apparent in his fifties.


Luckily Placido Domingo is still very much with us so we can keep him in the present tense, but interestingly, later in life he has switched to baritone repertory so in that sense he "was" a tenor. smile

Sophia

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247172
03/15/14 07:42 PM
03/15/14 07:42 PM
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In our industry, as in many others, there are fancy terms trying somehow to emulate a higher meaning into things than necessary.
"orchestral voicing" is IMHO one of them - impressive sounding jargon.
I only know "good' and "not so good" voicers.
The "good ones" don't seem to have a problem: they make each piano sound best they can.

Quote
That may be, wimpiano. However, Bluthner, Schimmel and Seiler also have secondary and tertiary lines with international parts sourcing and/or non-German manufacturing sites, yet they still manage to be BVK members. How come Bechstein is not?


Perhaps ask Mr. Stein, CEO Grotrian Piano Manufaktur, Braunschweig or Bechstein Ag itself.

Mr Stein initiated the motion for official certification among German manufacturers fulfilling minimum requirements qualifying for "made in Germany" status.

"Why" or "why not" someone belongs to this list is for others to interpret.

Norbert





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Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: sophial] #2247199
03/15/14 09:05 PM
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LOL, Sophia. I knew that Domingo was still alive, but I thought that he had retired from singing altogether. The man is in his seventies, for Christ's sake! shocked

How is he doing with the baritone repertory? More power to him if he can still sing to professional standards.

Last edited by Almaviva; 03/15/14 09:07 PM.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247276
03/16/14 01:14 AM
03/16/14 01:14 AM
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Domingo recently sang at the Met as Neptune in "The Enchanted Island". He has continued plans to sing baritone roles and is also still conducting, teaching, and many other activities. The man is a wonder.

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247336
03/16/14 07:15 AM
03/16/14 07:15 AM
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this discussion has been interesting and helps explain why i always have so much trouble communicating to my technician what i'm hearing or what i'm wanting. using words to describe musical sound is a frustration.

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: toyboy] #2247397
03/16/14 11:04 AM
03/16/14 11:04 AM
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Try using demonstration to communicate with your technician. Note the places in specific pieces where the results are problematic. Play those sections for your technician and see what they say.


In a seemingly infinite universe-infinite human creativity is-seemingly possible.
According to NASA, 93% of the earth like planets possible in the known universe have yet to be formed.
Contact: Ed@LightHammerpiano.com
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Ed McMorrow, RPT] #2247579
03/16/14 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed McMorrow, RPT
Try using demonstration to communicate with your technician. Note the places in specific pieces where the results are problematic. Play those sections for your technician and see what they say.


believe me i do. it doesn't help that i have a very strong minded tech who has no worry speaking his mind (i'm putting it politely). but he's very good at what he does. the most difficulty is trying to describe what i want when it comes to something more general than a problem, such as voicing. in the end i just let him do what he wants.

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: toyboy] #2247589
03/16/14 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by toyboy
this discussion has been interesting and helps explain why i always have so much trouble communicating to my technician what i'm hearing or what i'm wanting. using words to describe musical sound is a frustration.
Yes, but I think one of the qualities of a good tech is being able to understand what a pianist wants no matter how it's phrased. Or ask appropriate questions of the pianist to try and clarify the pianist's meaning.

The purely technical skill of a tech is not so useful if they can't figure out what the pianist wants.

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: toyboy] #2247612
03/16/14 07:05 PM
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It is more important for a technician to listen to the pianist than it is to listen to the piano. Finding compatible communication methods is part of the art of living. I sometimes fail at this.

People can be more difficult than pianos at times. But I do enjoy musicians and the music they make.


In a seemingly infinite universe-infinite human creativity is-seemingly possible.
According to NASA, 93% of the earth like planets possible in the known universe have yet to be formed.
Contact: Ed@LightHammerpiano.com
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247722
03/17/14 12:01 AM
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I firmly believe my Frankenpiano is orchestrally voiced. Lower octaves are reminscent of a toddler beating a large metal pot with a wooden spoon. Somewhere around middle C it becomes the unloved child of a banjo and a funhouse organ, finishing with top notes of breaking glass across a rusty screen door.
Bechstein should offer me a good deal of money to study this elegant, sophisticated array of voices.


Yamaha LU101, Casio CDP220R. 1968 Mason & Risch 'frankenpiano' only the cat plays. It's where our musical journey began though so I refuse to get rid of it.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: ShannonG] #2247723
03/17/14 12:04 AM
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Originally Posted by ShannonG
I firmly believe my Frankenpiano is orchestrally voiced. Lower octaves are reminscent of a toddler beating a large metal pot with a wooden spoon. Somewhere around middle C it becomes the unloved child of a banjo and a funhouse organ, finishing with top notes of breaking glass across a rusty screen door.
Bechstein should offer me a good deal of money to study this elegant, sophisticated array of voices.

By far the best post on the topic!! (with all due respect to Sally Phillips)

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: rlinkt] #2247726
03/17/14 12:23 AM
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Ed McMorrow, RPT Online content
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Ed McMorrow, RPT  Online Content
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Joined: Dec 2012
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Seattle, WA USA
So Sorry rlinkt,
Seems your offer has been rejected. Back to the laboratory for you. I could lend you my assistant Igor-he is very good with brains.


In a seemingly infinite universe-infinite human creativity is-seemingly possible.
According to NASA, 93% of the earth like planets possible in the known universe have yet to be formed.
Contact: Ed@LightHammerpiano.com
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Ed McMorrow, RPT] #2247765
03/17/14 04:24 AM
03/17/14 04:24 AM
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 565
Vermont
toyboy Offline
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Posts: 565
Vermont
Originally Posted by Ed McMorrow, RPT

People can be more difficult than pianos at times.


and so can technicians!

Originally Posted by pianoloverus
Yes, but I think one of the qualities of a good tech is being able to understand what a pianist wants no matter how it's phrased. Or ask appropriate questions of the pianist to try and clarify the pianist's meaning.


more than agreed. i had one tech that i could communicate with wonderfully. then he got brain cancer. not to say that listening carefully is what caused it.



"Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense."
- Gertrude Stein
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247769
03/17/14 04:51 AM
03/17/14 04:51 AM
Joined: Jun 2013
Posts: 211
Norway
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pogmoger Offline
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Norway
This is all very interesting. The term 'orchestral voicing' seems to have two different definitions in this thread, which makes its use as an accepted term with a specific meaning impossible.

If I'm not misinterpreting anything, it seems that Bechstein use the term to mean different tone character from the same note on the same piano when played at different volumes. This is not the same as what Sally describes as 'orchestral' voicing, where different areas of the pianos range have a different tone character. I have heard the term used by a dealer in this way in a discussion about the tone philosophy of Boesendorfer. The bass is rich, resonant and can be somewhat heavy, which is in contrast to the upper registers which are clear and bell like.

When I was looking at C. Bechstein M/Ps at the Bechstein showroom in Berlin, the salesperson did not use the word 'orchestral' at all when he discussed the tonal characteristics and aims of C. Bechstein pianos. He talked about purity of tone in each individual note, and a balance across the keyboard where the bass should not be too heavy and resonant so as to overpower the treble.

So all this led me to think of Boesendorfers as 'orchestrally' voiced, and C. Bechsteins as a polar opposite of this. Yet Piano Buyer claims Bechstein use the term 'orchestral' to describe their pianos (with a different meaning entirely.)

This makes the whole discussion of the meaning of this term somewhat loaded, and its easy to dismiss it as a marketing gimmick. I would just say that when I first heard the word 'orchestral' used to describe piano tone, I found it helpful in the context of the conversation at the time to increase my understanding of the differences in tone between different pianos. As a 'technical' term, it doesn't seem very helpful, but as always any description of sound is very subjective so words will often mean different things to different people. We don't need to take these analogies too seriously/literally.

Last edited by pogmoger; 03/17/14 12:54 PM. Reason: Clarity/factual accuracy.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247776
03/17/14 05:49 AM
03/17/14 05:49 AM
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,149
The Netherlands
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WimPiano Offline
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The Netherlands
Interesting info pogmoger!

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247835
03/17/14 10:15 AM
03/17/14 10:15 AM
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 7,439
Rochester MN
Minnesota Marty Offline

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Minnesota Marty  Offline

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Joined: May 2012
Posts: 7,439
Rochester MN
OK -- Here's a phrase quoted directly from the Bechstein website in reference to the C. Bechstein line:

"integral sound-energy system"

May I assume it means; "soundboard?"

All manufacturer's sites drip with flowery hyperbole. This is nothing new, and it certainly wasn't invented by Bechstein.

I was unable to find the term "'orchestrally' voiced" on the Bechstein site. Please note that even L. Fine used quotation marks on the word orchestrally. I don't know if this was used for emphasis or as a direct copy of text. The only thing that comes close to the description is the phrase; "ultra-nuanced unfolding tone."

How about "The Duplex-Scala?" Does the difference in spelling change what it is?

I do not mean to pick on Bechstein. Check out any builder's website or brochure and it will be filled with such phrases. They are marketing terms (hype), pure and simple.

Isn't the object of all fine voicing to have the timbre develop as the volume increases? Isn't this what pianists hear as tonal color? Isn't this what great pianos are designed to do? Is it unique to "orchestral voicing?"

Almaviva, it is best to take those sorts of terms with a grain of salt or a spoonful of sugar.


Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247844
03/17/14 10:44 AM
03/17/14 10:44 AM
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 5,540
Melbourne, Australia
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ando Offline
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Melbourne, Australia
I think the term "orchestral voicing" is completely superfluous because it always needs to be followed up with statements that explain what they mean. They may as well leave it out and come straight out and say what sort of tone the piano has, but alas, that is not how marketing works. Marketing deals with buzzwords and the like - most of it is vacuous nonsense, but advertising gurus are convinced it's the only way to sell a product. It's tiresome to those who can see through it - one can only conclude that buzzword marketing is directed at the uninitiated - whatever the product may be. This whole thread has still not managed to nail down a definition of "orchestral voicing". I hope the term doesn't catch on so much that we see it mentioned in every thread about piano tone one day. That would be very irritating to have it discussed time and time again with no consensus ever reached.

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Minnesota Marty] #2247859
03/17/14 11:17 AM
03/17/14 11:17 AM
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WimPiano Offline
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Originally Posted by Minnesota Marty

I was unable to find the term "'orchestrally' voiced" on the Bechstein site.

Not the exact text but something like it:

http://bechstein.com/en/meta-header...eleases/bechstein-academy-a-175-new.html

Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: WimPiano] #2247888
03/17/14 12:47 PM
03/17/14 12:47 PM
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 7,439
Rochester MN
Minnesota Marty Offline

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Minnesota Marty  Offline

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Joined: May 2012
Posts: 7,439
Rochester MN
Originally Posted by wimpiano
Originally Posted by Minnesota Marty

I was unable to find the term "'orchestrally' voiced" on the Bechstein site.

Not the exact text but something like it:

http://bechstein.com/en/meta-header...eleases/bechstein-academy-a-175-new.html

"When a person plays over the entire keyboard, an orchestral sound is produced that one would hardly expect from such a medium-sized grand piano."

Well, I find that to be even more confusing than what is stated in the "A & D Piano Buyer" in reference to Bechstein voicing.


Marty in Minnesota

It's much easier to bash a Steinway than it is to play one.
Re: What the heck is "Orchestral Voicing"? [Re: Almaviva] #2247889
03/17/14 12:50 PM
03/17/14 12:50 PM
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WimPiano Offline
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The Netherlands
Perhaps they fitted little bows, flutes, and so on. Haha

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