Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Who's Online Now
77 registered members (7uturu, Beakybird, Animisha, Cheshire Chris, Alex C, 19 invisible), 1,131 guests, and 3 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor #2219125
01/22/14 09:59 PM
01/22/14 09:59 PM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 101
United States
R
RyanThePianist Offline OP
Full Member
RyanThePianist  Offline OP
Full Member
R

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 101
United States
Hey all. I need some advice regarding pedaling this famous prelude.

First off, I'm trying to decide what's the best way to pedal the nightmarish middle section. Should I pedal once each bar? My former teacher said she thinks she used to pedal on each beat, so four times each bar, but she's unsure. Is this best? Maybe there's a different method?

Also, I haven't had my Yamaha G3 for too long (about 7 months now), and I heard from a forum long ago that there was technique for this piece specifically involving the middle pedal on grand pianos that is used to sustain notes on the lower registers during the opening section. Anybody know this specific technique and how to execute it properly? I would imagine it involved sustaining the C#, G#, etc. How about the damper pedal? Should I use it in the opening section and towards the end, or is it preferable to not used it all? Or is this personal preference?

Lastlt, does anybody have any tips on how to practice the middle section other than the traditional slow/staccato practice? It's coming along nicely; however, I still feel a bit sloppy as I increase tempo.

Thoughts?

Last edited by RyanThePianist; 01/22/14 10:01 PM.

Novice Private Piano Teacher

BA Music, Biology Minor

Yamaha G3
Piano & Music Gifts & Accessories (570)
Piano accessories and music gift items
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219139
01/22/14 10:24 PM
01/22/14 10:24 PM
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,382
western MA, USA
H
hreichgott Offline
3000 Post Club Member
hreichgott  Offline
3000 Post Club Member
H

Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,382
western MA, USA
Originally Posted by RyanThePianist
technique for this piece specifically involving the middle pedal on grand pianos that is used to sustain notes on the lower registers during the opening section. Anybody know this specific technique and how to execute it properly? I would imagine it involved sustaining the C#, G#, etc. How about the damper pedal? Should I use it in the opening section and towards the end, or is it preferable to not used it all? Or is this personal preference?

The sostenuto pedal is the middle pedal. On an upright, it is the "miscellaneous" pedal and does whatever the manufacturer thought would be useful. On a grand, it takes the dampers that are currently raised, and holds them up regardless of whether you let go of the key. That means if you press a low C#, then press and hold the sostenuto pedal, then take your hand off the C#, the C# will continue to sound until you let go of the pedal. It is very useful with any piece where you have far-apart sustained notes, and with any piece where some note needs to be held and meanwhile you want to play other notes staccato.

Of course damper pedal is also appropriate with this piece. Experiment and see what pedaling choices sound good to you. Use caution when combining the damper pedal and sostenuto -- since the damper pedal raises all the dampers, if it's down when you press the sostenuto pedal down, then the sost will just hold all the dampers up (since it "knows" what dampers are up, not which keys are pressed) thereby behaving exactly the same as the damper pedal. Pressing sost first then damper will give the desired results.


Heather W. Reichgott, piano http://heatherwreichgott.blogspot.com

Working on:
Cabaret (whole show)
12+ variations from classical ballets
Verdi: Stabat Mater
Copland: Appalachian Spring
Tangos and other fun music for piano duo

I love Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and new music
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219146
01/22/14 10:35 PM
01/22/14 10:35 PM
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,114
TwoSnowflakes Offline
2000 Post Club Member
TwoSnowflakes  Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,114
Ha, I just worked this out yesterday for the middle section with my teacher. I'm pedaling twice a measure for the most part (or half pedaling, anything to keep it from sounding muddy), and then when it starts to descend in the middle for three measures (F#, E, D-nat, C#; D-nat C# B, A; A, G#, F#, E) for me the only way to keep that well articulated is to pedal four times per measure.

The rest is pretty straight forward.

And no, I didn't find any other way to get the tempo up other than to play it slow and alternate with staccato play. I did a lot of deliberately excessive arm rotation so I wouldn't seize up, plaster my elbow to my side and start stabbing at the notes as I'm wont to do when I feel like the speed is challenging, and then as I gained stable smoothness, began to reduce the arm movement so it was nice and efficient.

I'm not done with this section yet. I still have a hard time not rushing/seizing/falling apart as it climaxes, but the descending triplets are fine.

It's reliably at around 70bpm, half note to the click, and often very nice at around 80, but not solidly, haha.

I've been working on it for a while and because this is probably the fastest piece I've ever had to play with such difficult dynamics, it really took me a long, long time. But I'm hopeful that in a couple of weeks I can proudly put it in the "done for now" pile.

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219152
01/22/14 10:43 PM
01/22/14 10:43 PM
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,114
TwoSnowflakes Offline
2000 Post Club Member
TwoSnowflakes  Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,114
I abandoned the sostenuto method, though I really wanted to take that pedal out for a spin. I was happier with the regular pedal and using it more variably (skimming off, half pedaling, full pedaling) rather than fooling around with the sostenuto pedal.

I did manage to figure out how to use the sostenuto with the regular pedal in order to truly sustain the bottom note, it's just I didn't like what it sounded like once I did!

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219160
01/22/14 11:03 PM
01/22/14 11:03 PM
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,542
California
P
phantomFive Offline
3000 Post Club Member
phantomFive  Offline
3000 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,542
California
Originally Posted by RyanThePianist
Hey all. I need some advice regarding pedaling this famous prelude.

First off, I'm trying to decide what's the best way to pedal the nightmarish middle section. Should I pedal once each bar? My former teacher said she thinks she used to pedal on each beat, so four times each bar, but she's unsure. Is this best? Maybe there's a different method?


Pedaling technique depends on the piano; some pianos have longer sustains, for example, so would need more frequent pedaling. Listen to the sound and you will see the most rapid improvement in your skill.

Originally Posted by RyanThePianist


Also, I haven't had my Yamaha G3 for too long (about 7 months now), and I heard from a forum long ago that there was technique for this piece specifically involving the middle pedal on grand pianos that is used to sustain notes on the lower registers during the opening section. Anybody know this specific technique and how to execute it properly? I would imagine it involved sustaining the C#, G#, etc. How about the damper pedal? Should I use it in the opening section and towards the end, or is it preferable to not used it all? Or is this personal preference?

I press the middle pedal down, followed quickly by the damper pedal. Then I lift and re-press the damper pedal every time the chord changes.

The important thing here is to note the two melodies going on, the one below, and the one above. The middle pedal takes care of the one below, the right pedal takes care of the one above. Try to manipulate them both in a way that the listener can feel both melodies.

Originally Posted by RyanThePianist

Lastlt, does anybody have any tips on how to practice the middle section other than the traditional slow/staccato practice? It's coming along nicely; however, I still feel a bit sloppy as I increase tempo.


You'll see the quickest improvement here by working on your finger speed and technique generally. There are many ways to do so, but I suggest either doing a warmup, before playing anything else, of the first 20 or 30 exercises of Hannon (bonus if you do them in a different key every day), or checking out Cortot's method.

Last edited by phantomFive; 01/22/14 11:24 PM. Reason: grammatical mistake

Poetry is rhythm
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219332
01/23/14 10:00 AM
01/23/14 10:00 AM
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,114
TwoSnowflakes Offline
2000 Post Club Member
TwoSnowflakes  Offline
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 2,114
So, I went on youtube to check out various people playing it and to see if the video showed either their feet or the dampers. I still haven't gotten far but I was posting to say...oh my goodness. My middle section is not enormously slower than the piece should ultimately go.

I really thought there was NO POSSIBLE WAY I would ever play this thing at any thing other than a "aww, isn't it sweet how hard she tries" speed, but I may have mostly gotten where I want it. My sense was that now that I have it kind of down, we would now begin the task of bringing in the speed, but for the most part, it's already there.

There's an enormous sound difference between me and, say, well, just about anybody on youtube who is on a Real Stage playing a Big Piano, but that's...ok.

Anyway, just thought I'd share my epiphany for the day: speed will come. Practice makes perfect (or, at least, within spitting distance of competent).

If I don't choke for the red light, I may record this and show you guys. Not because I think I can play it better than any of you, but because I'm proud of how far I'VE come.

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: TwoSnowflakes] #2219346
01/23/14 10:29 AM
01/23/14 10:29 AM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,619
Minneapolis, MN
griffin2417 Offline

Silver Supporter until Dec 29 2012
griffin2417  Offline

Silver Supporter until Dec 29 2012


Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,619
Minneapolis, MN

I really appreciate seeing this thread right now. My teacher thinks I'm ready to start working on this piece and he's tentatively planning to start me on it next month. I'm curious to know how long ago each of you started on this piece. I realize we each have different backgrounds, etc. however, I find it interesting to learn how much time individuals take to work on their music.

Would you mind sharing that information? Also, do you have any tips for me as I first get started working on this piece? Thanks!



Carl

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219369
01/23/14 11:20 AM
01/23/14 11:20 AM
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
J
joe80 Offline
2000 Post Club Member
joe80  Offline
2000 Post Club Member
J

Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
I do this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vj4LuE87RSg

(this is me)

Rachmaninoff's piano at that time was almost certainly something with two pedals. It could have been any make, as it was 19th Century Russia, but it was most likely to have been a Bechstein or Bluthner. Rachmaninoff was known to have used a Bluthner, and owned a Bluthner http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sergei_Rachmaninoff,_1910s.jpg

So there was no sostenuto involved.

OK, but it DOES depend on the tone of the piano, if it has a thick sound if you like, you're gonna want to pedal more often. If it has a lighter sound, you can pedal less frequently.

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: joe80] #2219461
01/23/14 01:51 PM
01/23/14 01:51 PM
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,542
California
P
phantomFive Offline
3000 Post Club Member
phantomFive  Offline
3000 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,542
California
Originally Posted by joe80
I do this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vj4LuE87RSg

(this is me)

Rachmaninoff's piano at that time was almost certainly something with two pedals. It could have been any make, as it was 19th Century Russia, but it was most likely to have been a Bechstein or Bluthner. Rachmaninoff was known to have used a Bluthner, and owned a Bluthner http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sergei_Rachmaninoff,_1910s.jpg


Nice playing.


Poetry is rhythm
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219481
01/23/14 02:33 PM
01/23/14 02:33 PM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 106
New York, NY
T
TimV Offline
Full Member
TimV  Offline
Full Member
T

Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 106
New York, NY
If you do decide to use the sostenuto (middle) pedal, be sure you work it out so you could play it either way: with and without. It can be a finicky beast, and it's not uncommon for them not to work as well as they should. Obviously a piano tuned and regulated for the concert stage should be fine. But you never know whether or not you'll be playing on a really fine instrument or on a farm tractor.

You may have to switch to a single-pedal scheme unexpectedly.


--------------------------
Bach WTC 1 #7
Brahms Op 76 #1, Op 118 #5
Debussy Suite Bergamasque
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219495
01/23/14 03:06 PM
01/23/14 03:06 PM
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
J
joe80 Offline
2000 Post Club Member
joe80  Offline
2000 Post Club Member
J

Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
Yeah, the middle pedal can be unreliable on some instruments. It's so seldom used that many manufacturers didn't bother until perhaps the last ten or 20 years. Steinway Hamburg have actually stopped putting it on their uprights - they were fitting them all with sostenuto for a while but the recent models don't have it.

Bechstein, Bluthner and Bosendorfer weren't putting it on as standard until the 90s, as far as I'm aware. Yamaha started it a little bit earlier than that. It used to be that most of the pianos for export to the USA would have it, and some of the concert grands would have it, but it never became popular outside of the USA until fairly recently.

Incidentally, when rebuilding a piano that has two pedals, it can be retrofitted with a sostenuto but it's a pain in the neck, and needs some tweaking on the back action, so it can make things awkward for future technicians to regulate it, and many times you need to fit a new lyre as well - which isn't a major issue I guess.

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: phantomFive] #2219498
01/23/14 03:11 PM
01/23/14 03:11 PM
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
J
joe80 Offline
2000 Post Club Member
joe80  Offline
2000 Post Club Member
J

Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
Originally Posted by phantomFive
Originally Posted by joe80
I do this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vj4LuE87RSg

(this is me)

Rachmaninoff's piano at that time was almost certainly something with two pedals. It could have been any make, as it was 19th Century Russia, but it was most likely to have been a Bechstein or Bluthner. Rachmaninoff was known to have used a Bluthner, and owned a Bluthner http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sergei_Rachmaninoff,_1910s.jpg


Nice playing.


thanks.

That piano is an old Bluthner, a bit worn out, a concert grand with two pedals. The action is so light, I imagine that's what Horowitz piano felt like, but it does need work.

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: joe80] #2219512
01/23/14 03:51 PM
01/23/14 03:51 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,530
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,530
Last time I played this piece (semi-formally) for an audience, I'd practised on my digital at home using the sostenuto, which of course worked perfectly, the way it was supposed to. I knew the piano I'd be playing on was a 6-foot C.Bechstein grand, so I'd assumed it would have a sostenuto pedal.

To my surprise and (almost) shock, when I got there, it only had two pedals. And I was given no practice time on it, so I just had to rethink my pedaling on the fly. And keep my left foot firmly on the floor, otherwise I might inadvertently mix up my una corda and sostenuto pedaling.

Since then, whenever I'm practising any piece for a recital, I don't use the sostenuto pedal at all.....


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: RyanThePianist] #2219513
01/23/14 03:53 PM
01/23/14 03:53 PM
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
J
joe80 Offline
2000 Post Club Member
joe80  Offline
2000 Post Club Member
J

Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 2,973
- a few times in other pieces I've worked out some sostenuto stuff, and the piano has had a sostenuto, and it just hasn't worked!

Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: bennevis] #2219522
01/23/14 04:09 PM
01/23/14 04:09 PM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 9,328
New York City
P
Polyphonist Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Polyphonist  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 9,328
New York City
Originally Posted by bennevis
I knew the piano I'd be playing on was a 6-foot C.Bechstein grand, so I'd assumed it would have a sostenuto pedal. To my surprise and (almost) shock, when I got there, it only had two pedals. And I was given no practice time on it.

Wait a minute. You went to play a concert and all the hall had was a 6-foot Bechstein with two pedals??? And you didn't bother to check beforehand?


Regards,

Polyphonist
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: Polyphonist] #2219535
01/23/14 04:29 PM
01/23/14 04:29 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,530
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,530
Originally Posted by Polyphonist
Originally Posted by bennevis
I knew the piano I'd be playing on was a 6-foot C.Bechstein grand, so I'd assumed it would have a sostenuto pedal. To my surprise and (almost) shock, when I got there, it only had two pedals. And I was given no practice time on it.

Wait a minute. You went to play a concert and all the hall had was a 6-foot Bechstein with two pedals??? And you didn't bother to check beforehand?

It wasn't a formal concert - just a charity thing for colleagues and acquaintances and their friends, which I do occasionally. I was told that the piano was a decent one, and I was OK with it when I was told it was a 6-foot C.Bechstein grand and had just been tuned, though I hadn't seen it grin.

In any case, I'm used to coping with all sorts of pianos (it never takes me more than a few minutes to adjust), so I didn't think of checking it out first - it was a one-hour drive to get there. Actually, I quite enjoy being let loose on a good piano that I've never seen or played before - just as long as the audience aren't made up of music critics wink .


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: bennevis] #2219536
01/23/14 04:31 PM
01/23/14 04:31 PM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 9,328
New York City
P
Polyphonist Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Polyphonist  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
P

Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 9,328
New York City
Originally Posted by bennevis
I was told that the piano was a decent one, and I was OK with it when I was told it was a 6-foot C.Bechstein grand and had just been tuned, though I hadn't seen it grin

That's why you should always check first. whome


Regards,

Polyphonist
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: Polyphonist] #2219576
01/23/14 05:08 PM
01/23/14 05:08 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,530
B
bennevis Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
bennevis  Offline
Yikes! 10000 Post Club Member
B

Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 11,530
Originally Posted by Polyphonist
Originally Posted by bennevis
I was told that the piano was a decent one, and I was OK with it when I was told it was a 6-foot C.Bechstein grand and had just been tuned, though I hadn't seen it grin

That's why you should always check first. whome

But that would ruin the element of surprise and spontaneity wink .

BTW, that pedal 'problem' wasn't the worst I'd experienced in a recital. Once, I stepped in at short notice for a similar event, and discovered that the piano (a small K.Kawai grand, almost brand new), was raised a few inches higher than I'm used to, with the effect that its pedals were very high off the floor (probably because of its wheels). I rapidly discovered that my calves were stretched to their limit if I tried to pedal with my heels resting on the floor (I always wear flat, comfortable shoes - never high heels wink ) . The pain forced me to abandon the una corda pedal within a few minutes. And then, I subjected poor Mozart and Beethoven to next-to-no pedal (Glenn Gould would have approved, no doubt), and Chopin, Schumann and Rachmaninov to almost continuous pedal......

Next time, I brought my Yellow Pages with me to use as a foot rest. You live and learn...... grin


"I don't play accurately - anyone can play accurately - but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life."
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: TimV] #2219577
01/23/14 05:08 PM
01/23/14 05:08 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 22,291
Victoria, BC
BruceD Offline
Gold Subscriber
BruceD  Offline
Gold Subscriber

Joined: May 2001
Posts: 22,291
Victoria, BC
Originally Posted by TimV
[...]whether or not you'll be playing on a really fine instrument or on a farm tractor.


Oh, Deere! smile


BruceD
- - - - -
Estonia 190
Re: Pedaling Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C-sharp minor [Re: bennevis] #2219580
01/23/14 05:20 PM
01/23/14 05:20 PM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 924
Seattle, WA
M
MarkH Offline
500 Post Club Member
MarkH  Offline
500 Post Club Member
M

Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 924
Seattle, WA
Originally Posted by bennevis
Once, I stepped in at short notice for a similar event, and discovered that the piano (a small K.Kawai grand, almost brand new), was raised a few inches higher than I'm used to, with the effect that its pedals were very high off the floor (probably because of its wheels). I rapidly discovered that my calves were stretched to their limit if I tried to pedal with my heels resting on the floor...


Haha, that happened to me too, when I was playing at a wedding of a friend. Things had to start within a minute or two, and I tried to find a book or something , but there wasn't time. Also, entertainingly, when I was frantically asking people for a book or something and explained the situation, everybody responded with thoughts of, "But it's a piano and you play the piano! You should be able to play it fine!" When I finished, I felt like I had run a stadium using just my right leg!

Last edited by MarkH; 01/23/14 05:24 PM.
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Brendan, Kreisler 

Shop Our Online Store!
Shop Our Store Online
Shop PianoSupplies.com

Did you know Piano World has an online store, and that it's loaded with goodies pianists and music lovers want?
Check it out and place your order.

Special Purchase!
Keyboard and Roses Piano Bench Cushion Keyboard & Roses 14"x30" piano bench cushions Regularly sold for $79 to $100, now only $39. (while supplies last)

(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Bechstein
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Piano marvel vs playground sessions?
by chongjasmine. 03/26/19 05:50 AM
Lifting the CA98
by iLogic. 03/26/19 02:58 AM
How much is this piano worth
by humble_pianist. 03/25/19 05:49 PM
What's Hot!!
PIANO TEACHERS Please read this!
-------------------
European Tour for Piano Lovers
JOIN US FOR THE TOUR!
--------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics191,131
Posts2,810,925
Members92,879
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

Sweetwater

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2019 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.2