2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Who's Online Now
67 members (Charles Cohen, Beowulf, Carey, 3x4rt, anotherscott, BbAltered, 18 invisible), 410 guests, and 410 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
#2219199 01/23/14 01:06 AM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,948
E
3000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
3000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,948
It's our summer break here so I am teacherless and that leads to thinking......very dangerous.

I have been reading some old posts here (what a fantastic resource) and one that struck me was this one.

Originally Posted by Elissa Milne


Students should be learning gazillions of pieces each year (in the case of my students, 'gazillions' equates to at least 30 often 40).

You ask if there is any merit in requiring students to learn so many pieces? Oh. My. Goodness. YES!!! I could write a book about why this is so (in fact, that's going on the to-do list right now...), but this is a fundamentally important thing to know: moving from grade to grade learning even only FIVE pieces leaves students musically impoverished and teachers around Australia will tell you about students hitting Grade 4 (sometimes Grade 3) and suddenly finding it's really hard yakka. This is due to the student's substantial lack of experience because they've hardly played any music. I cannot emphasise enough how vital it is to any student's progress to learn many, many pieces at each level.


While this make perfect sense and it is already a given that quality versus quantity should be in balance does anybody learn this amount or recommend learning this many per year?

To what level (adequate or performance) should one learn so many pieces?

Should each piece be in the grade you are studying or made up of both current grade and simpler pieces from lower grades?

I am not asking these questions to race through grades or compare myself to others I am just seeking to have an efficient learning plan.




Following Trying to follow the Ling Ling 40 hour method

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219200 01/23/14 01:09 AM
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 343
A
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 343
I learn maybe 10 each year... But they usually all go towards competitions and performances. I don't think I'd recommend 30... It seems too much on the quantity side.

Last edited by A Guy; 01/23/14 01:09 AM.
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219215 01/23/14 01:58 AM
Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,365
S
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
S
Joined: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,365
There are few right or wrong answers when it comes to music. There are a LOT of opinions. For those going the method book route, I would tend to agree with the sentiment expressed. Beginner method book students often do one, two, even three pieces each week, sometimes lingering two to four weeks on some of the milestone pieces. Most of the book pieces are short. The main goal is not to learn the piece, certainly not to polish and memorize and get it ready for performance, but to learn the concepts being introduced in each piece.

With all that, there are many other roads. While the majority use method books, at least at the beginning, there are others that go a different way. After a method book beginner gets past book two, they can choose to continue to churn out new pieces at factory level quality, or try to focus more in depth and up their quality to the next level. I tend to advocate balance, so perhaps a little of both: have a few well polished and memorized pieces, while continuing to learn lots of other pieces at a surface level.

Each choice comes with a cost. One caveat is that factory level quality from the best of the best, is often higher than the most polished work of the average students. In my travels, I find it to be that way in music. Some folks just have it. Some folks spend their lives chasing it. Some get a glimpse of it with a lot of hard work. Some never seem to get there.

I am low level beginner at piano. For me, writing original music has always been the driving force. I came to piano with close to zero musical education, but a good deal of experience making music and writing songs. I spend a lot of time writing, and do a few cover tunes. For most pieces, the goal is live performance, so I tend to spend a lot of time on each one. I also like arranging the cover tunes, because that feeds my main goal of writing original music.

By doing my own arrangements, I get to know the music at an intimate level. Of course, this comes at a cost. I might spend three or four months on a simple beginner piece. The same piece might take a method book beginner a week or two. However, they aren't getting to where I am getting. They too are impoverished as compared to my experience, though in a different way.

I am not saying that my way is a better way. It certainly is not something I would recommend for anyone asking for advice. It is not going to get anyone past an exam. However, it is the way I have chosen. Many find fault with so many things in my technique, my compositions, my phrasing, my dynamics, etc, etc.

What remains a mystery is how much or how little I might have accomplished with a traditional method book approach. Perhaps I would have done well, perhaps not. Perhaps I would have already have quit out of boredom and my struggles with some of the sight reading and rhythm exercises (both of which I tend to be poor at.) As I said, there are few right or wrong answers.

I don't believe in a one-size-fits all approach to teaching or learning. While there are certainly more popular and what may seem to be more effective methods on average, they may or may not be the best approach for each individual. As always, the most important thing is to enjoy the journey, and keep the flame burning. If the flame goes out, the rest tends to be meaningless.

Last edited by Sand Tiger; 01/23/14 02:32 AM.
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219239 01/23/14 03:32 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 7,082

Gold Supporter until March 1 2014
7000 Post Club Member
Offline

Gold Supporter until March 1 2014
7000 Post Club Member
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 7,082
As I read the first sentence of your post I thought it was an old thread that had been revivied, then I realized what your location is smile


I agree that it is important, especially for newer students, to learn a lot of pieces in a lot of different styles.
That being said.....30 a year? I don't know. That seems a lot.

If you figure 52 weeks in a year, and then fit in your vacation, your teacher's vacation, all the holidays throughout the year, school summer break (which here lasts almost 3 months).....you may only have 30 weeks of lessons (in fact I know schools here that sell packages for 30 weeks). So...1 piece a week? What level are you going to get to on each piece? As the pieces increase in complexity there's no way you can do one a week and learn all you can from it.

In the beginning most of us start off with 1 piece a week. At some point we may work on between 3-6 pieces of different complexities and have one that we've just started, one we're part way through and one that is just about ready to perform.....but I know only a few folks who are working on 6 at a time. I think I've seriously been able to work on 4 tops.

...30? Well, I repeat: it sounds really high to me.


[Linked Image]
18 ABF Recitals, Order of the Red Dot
European Piano Parties - Brussels, Lisbon, Lucern, Milan, Malaga, St. Goar
Themed recitals: Grieg and Great American Songbook


Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219251 01/23/14 05:20 AM
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,960

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
1000 Post Club Member
Offline

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,960
I think 20 to 30 per year is very feasible, and very good exposure to different techniques and styles, BUT most of these will be very short, easy pieces. I don't think an intermediate or advanced student can learn so many.

I studied 16 pieces in the second half of 2013 but most of them where less than 1 minute long, and only a handful were challenging. I recorded most of them, but not all, and for some I didn't get to the required tempo (but that's a problem of mine).

All in all, I'd say it's good to see a lot of music, but if one practices sight-reading regularly and/or some technique book such as Beyer, Czerny and the like, you get to read a lot without having to actually study the pieces. As soon as I realise that a Czerny exercise requires me more than 20 minutes to play through slowly, I will have to re-assess my schedule.

Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
sinophilia #2219253 01/23/14 05:36 AM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,948
E
3000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
3000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,948
Originally Posted by sinophilia
I recorded most of them, but not all, and for some I didn't get to the required tempo (but that's a problem of mine).



Actually I think it is a common problem and what prompted my question on how many pieces we would be expected to get to performance level.


Following Trying to follow the Ling Ling 40 hour method

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219255 01/23/14 05:44 AM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,320
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,320
Gazillion pieces at what level and for what type of students? 30 - 40 pieces at fundamental grades sound normal. I remember finishing 3 levels of Thompson books and many pieces from 2 other books in a year. It is impossible for students at advanced level even if these students study piano full-time. It is out of the questions for adult students with other commitments, e.g. full-time job, children, household chores etc.

I agree that learning only 4 or 5 pieces a year for the sake of performing well in the exam is not enough even at advanced level. As an adult student with a full-time job, a partner, house chores, garden chores and 2 puppies, I learn around 10 pieces a year. Mostly the pieces are at my current level, a couple below my level, and a couple above my level. I also try to spend more time on technical works. For example, for the past 12 months, I was studying 3 of Rachmaninov preludes, a Mozart sonata, a Chopin nocturne and etude, a couple of pieces from Debussy's Children's Corner and Ravel's Jeux D'eau. At my own discretion, I revisited a Bach's prelude & fugue, another Mozart sonata, a Beethoven sonata, Chopin's fantaisie impromptu and another Rachmaninov prelude. I applied new techniques and musicality I've acquired recently to these pieces I previously learnt and try to bring them up to the next performance level.

What's the point of learning too many pieces in a short time but only learning the surface, e.g. just learning the notes and fingerings then never to go back? That to me is not learning music and certainly doesn't help you progress as a musician.



Be yourself

Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219273 01/23/14 07:18 AM
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,921
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,921
I'm a slow learner. Two or three new grade 8+ level new pieces a year. These would be 5-9 pages long and polished. And maybe another half dozen I noodle around with but never get close to performance level (for me). Usually these are pieces I like but that don"t challenge me enough to really sink my teeth into. I spend a lot of time working on old pieces that I want to keep, revive or refine. For me, at my stage of life (61) it's more about learning the pieces I love than about furthering my "skills" such as they are.


Slow down and do it right.
[Linked Image]
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219276 01/23/14 07:35 AM
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,960

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
1000 Post Club Member
Offline

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,960
Originally Posted by earlofmar
Actually I think it is a common problem and what prompted my question on how many pieces we would be expected to get to performance level.


This is only my opinion, but I think as beginners we can only do so much. Actually at each level, one can only achieve so much. It's not productive to be too much of a perfectionist.

So I would go for performance level (which could be a simple recording for an e-cital) only on a handful of pieces every year, and even those can be somehow imperfect. What I usually aim for with my little pieces is an acceptable level, i.e. being able to play them through with some ease, hopefully without mistakes (most of the times), as close as possible to the required tempo. I don't think a teacher would ask much more than that, otherwise you would be stuck with very few music.

Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219278 01/23/14 07:41 AM
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,960

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
1000 Post Club Member
Offline

Gold Supporter until Sept. 05 2014
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,960
Originally Posted by earlofmar

Should each piece be in the grade you are studying or made up of both current grade and simpler pieces from lower grades?


To answer to this one, I really think that, as soon as there is a lower grade, i.e. one is no longer an absolute beginner, it's great to add simpler pieces to one's practice; you'll learn them quickly and it will help with motivation. Also, even the easiest pieces contain some challenge or the other, because piano is hard, period. It may be a simple chord that you could not voice well, but now you can try. Or double notes (!) that a few months earlier would not have sounded perfect. A faster tempo, or an improved rhythm, dynamics, expression, whatever. Simpler pieces are probably our my only chance to try to play something perfectly wink

Last edited by sinophilia; 01/23/14 08:02 AM.
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219284 01/23/14 08:10 AM
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,294
W
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,294
Never thought about the journey this way but each year is somewhat different. Some pieces I'll pick up for a couple of weeks and others for longer. I've shared that this year I'm working on polishing some pieces as a repertoire and I think polish is different than the 30 piece idea. If we're working on sight reading (a good idea) that's a piece every day. Longer pieces take more than a couple of weeks. Depends too on how much daily practice time there is. I can play (and practice) about 7 pieces a day once they are under my fingers. The valuable concept that I got out of that teacher's perspective is to play a lot and more variety builds a particular comfort with playing.


[Linked Image]

Wise as in learner
Buff as in Colorado Buffalo
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219309 01/23/14 09:15 AM
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,161
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,161
Originally Posted by earlofmar
I am just seeking to have an efficient learning plan.
I thought you were with a teacher. I'm truly curious. If you are with a teacher, are you developing a plan that runs parallel with your teacher's plan or branching out?

I am with a teacher, but I have taken on pieces that are not part of my lessons each week.


Kawai MP11 : JBL LSR305 : Focusrite 2i4 : Pianoteq / Garritan CFX

We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams. -Willy Wonka


[Linked Image] [Linked Image]
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219483 01/23/14 02:36 PM
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,783
Gold Subscriber
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,783
Seems 'learn' would have to be defined. I understand 'learn' to be the level short of performance level. Learn is the 'good enough' level. Thirty or forty sounds like too many but four or five isn't enough.*

*On the other hand, it's important to break that measure down a bit--maybe it would be better to use the number of measures learned as the standard, rather than going by the number of pieces.


[Linked Image]
Yamaha C3X
In summer, the song sings itself. --William Carlos Williams

Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219489 01/23/14 02:49 PM
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,429
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,429
earlofmar,

I think it is fairly common for 1st and 2nd year students to be assigned what you might think is a large number of pieces, particularly with teachers that are not focused on grade level exams. But it also depends on the student's commitment to practice time and the length/frequency of lessons.

I just finished my fourth year of lessons, having started from zero experience with any instrument and 8 months of self-study piano. Without going back to look up the exact numbers in my practice notebook, the rough totals are something like 40 pieces in year one, 35 in year two, 20 in year three, and about 15 in year four. Importantly, I had committed from the start to one-hour weekly lessons and two hours of daily practice. I have usually worked on at least three pieces of varying difficulty level, mostly classical of all eras, but also some jazz pieces and christmas tunes. At various times we would also do weekly throw-away pieces....just try to play for one week then move on (these were in addition to the totals above). This was mainly for extra reading practice. There was also daily scales and technical exercises.

In those first few years, except for recital pieces, I rarely brought anything to performance level, and that was intentional. I believe my teacher's thinking is that in those early years getting that last 10% out of a piece takes a lot of time that can otherwise be used learning new skills in the next piece. It was really only in the last year of so that she has encouraged me to keep working on those pieces I have a fondness for (but we still move on in the lessons to other things). The pieces are much longer and more complex now, so obviously there are going to be fewer each year.

A final thought is that it can depend on the student's goals too. I started out saying I just want to have a little fun on the piano but quickly realized that what I really wanted was to eventually play advanced repertoire. I have told my teacher I will do whatever she thinks is best to achieve that end. It might be a completely different path and pace if the objective was different.

Hope this helps.



Goldberg Variations-Aria, JS Bach
Un Bel Di - Puccini
Musetta's Waltz - Puccini

Estonia L190 #7284[Linked Image][Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
JimF #2219510 01/23/14 03:48 PM
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,607
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,607
My teacher teaches me the RCM program, and she recommends I properly learn at least half the material (about 20 pieces depending on level spread across etudes, baroque, classical, and romantic/modern) before facing the exam and moving to the next grade level. The program is designed for students to progress about 1 level per year on average but they recommend at least 2 years for levels 10.

Sure, the exam requires only 5 pieces of music, but how well rounded would I be if I could only play 5 pieces from each level? Plus, what's the chance of me not struggle massively at the next level if I can't get to a point where learning pieces from my current level start to feel easy? With a busy professional and family life, I could barely learn 10 pieces a year, so it means I could only progress 1 grade level every other year. Plus my coordination is such that it seem to be so hard to learn new techniques while my kids are always saying, "oh that, easy." I basically accomplish half as much as kids if I put in the same amount of time. That means it would take me 20 years to get through all the levels. shocked Not sure I want to even think about that too much else get pretty depressed.

Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
scorpio #2219521 01/23/14 04:09 PM
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,948
E
3000 Post Club Member
OP Offline
3000 Post Club Member
E
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,948
Originally Posted by scorpio
Originally Posted by earlofmar
I am just seeking to have an efficient learning plan.
I thought you were with a teacher. I'm truly curious. If you are with a teacher, are you developing a plan that runs parallel with your teacher's plan or branching out?

I am with a teacher, but I have taken on pieces that are not part of my lessons each week.


I am with a teacher Scorpio but as I don't intend to sit exams she has allowed me to pick genre, qty and level of pieces I want to play.


Following Trying to follow the Ling Ling 40 hour method

Kawai K8 & Kawai Novus NV10


13x[Linked Image]
[Linked Image]
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219534 01/23/14 04:27 PM
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,607
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,607
Originally Posted by earlofmar

Originally Posted by Elissa Milne


Students should be learning gazillions of pieces each year (in the case of my students, 'gazillions' equates to at least 30 often 40).

You ask if there is any merit in requiring students to learn so many pieces? Oh. My. Goodness. YES!!! I could write a book about why this is so (in fact, that's going on the to-do list right now...), but this is a fundamentally important thing to know: moving from grade to grade learning even only FIVE pieces leaves students musically impoverished and teachers around Australia will tell you about students hitting Grade 4 (sometimes Grade 3) and suddenly finding it's really hard yakka. This is due to the student's substantial lack of experience because they've hardly played any music. I cannot emphasise enough how vital it is to any student's progress to learn many, many pieces at each level.


While this make perfect sense and it is already a given that quality versus quantity should be in balance does anybody learn this amount or recommend learning this many per year?

To what level (adequate or performance) should one learn so many pieces?

Should each piece be in the grade you are studying or made up of both current grade and simpler pieces from lower grades?

I am not asking these questions to race through grades or compare myself to others I am just seeking to have an efficient learning plan.




I disagree with the author of your quote only in the fact that learning 30 to 40 pieces from a grade level would typically mean learning almost every single piece of music in the books, which is certainly admirable, but not practical for most adults except the most dedicated maybe retired. Who has that much time? Even children who learn much faster would need to practice at least 2 hours a day to accomplish that, for an adult it would mean 3 to 4 hours. I have a hard enough time to police my kids to put in 7 hours a week, and I wish I had 3 hours to give to piano everyday.

Other than this, everything else is true. It makes no sense to learn too few pieces or just 5 for the exam even if you could play them perfectly, which never happens at the exam anyway.

I never learn pieces from previous grades. I don't have the time, and also they are too easy anyway. Always forward, never back unless you are deficient in something, which suggests the learning plan is flawed. I do play pieces from previous grade as sight-reading exercises. That's very important skill to develop not just for an exam, but more importantly, it makes learning the next level much easier / possible only if you constantly push your sight-reading ability forward. You should be able to sight-read 2 to 3 grade level down from your current level. It's a problem if you can't.

Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219573 01/23/14 05:05 PM
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,940
Z
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Z
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,940
Originally Posted by earlofmar
While this make perfect sense and it is already a given that quality versus quantity should be in balance does anybody learn this amount or recommend learning this many per year?
I get about halfway but I do recommend the concept.

Just as sight reading gets better by reading material that's easy enough to sight read instead of struggling with "easy" music that's still beyond our immediate skill set so our 'reading' and our versatility gets better and our skill set grows by taking on a new challenge every week or so. It should be clear that learning a piece in a week requires that the piece is easy enough for us to do so. If it turns out that the best we can manage is the 'ten little fingers' books of John Thompson for infants then so be it. I still have copies of this that I tried my sons on when they were infants and it recently made good sight reading fodder for one of them who is now getting more serious on the piano.

I don't manage a piece per week but I still work regularly on easier material doing Burgmüller and Benda alongside Beethoven and Brahms and learn many pieces in two or three weeks of work.

What matters most when playing (for others if not for ourselves) is how well we play not how long it took us. Playing piano, as opposed to other keyboard instruments, is about managing the dynamics well enough that a simple melodic line flows as if it were sung by matching each note to the dying level of the preceding one. This is a tough skill to master. It takes years. How should you learn this skill? Would it be better to use one of Chopin's Nocturne's that stretches us beyond all recognition or should we use a simplified version of Silent Night so that we build the skill quickly enough that we can soon tackle more demanding material without it feeling more demanding?

I work on five or six pieces each week. One or more is new material that's technically challenging. One is long memorised material being maintained/improved. At least two of them will be simple fare from one of my old Grade I-V books that will never be added to my repertoire of recital pieces but still fun to learn or play for myself.

I'm convinced the theory is sound though I cannot offer my own playing as proof of the pudding. I tweak my methods as I learn more about myself. As with anything we add to or change in our practise methods, it makes little sense or measurable effect if we don't try it, log it and compare results.



Richard
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219710 01/23/14 10:11 PM
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,390
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,390
What is the value of learning something to just short of performance level?
Unless it was just a sight reading exercise or something.
Why invest all that time and effort but stop just shy of being able to really play it?


Heather W. Reichgott, piano

Working on:
Beethoven - Diabelli Variations Op. 120
Beethoven/Liszt - Symphony no. 7
Tommy (whole show)

I love Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and new music
Re: No this isn't a "how many pieces per year" post (honest)
earlofmar #2219734 01/23/14 11:02 PM
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 233
B
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
B
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 233
Originally Posted by earlofmar
To what level (adequate or performance) should one learn so many pieces?


I think pieces should be learned to varying levels of polish. My teacher sees it this way as well.


"There is more to this piano playing malarkey than meets the eye" - adultpianist
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  BB Player 

Link Copied to Clipboard
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Karsten Collection
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Our October 2020 Free Piano Newsletter is Here!
---------------------
3,000,000+!
------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Pianoteq and Disklavier XP
by bSharp(C)yclist - 10/30/20 01:30 PM
The problem of ear to hand
by John 656 - 10/30/20 01:25 PM
Bluthner upright pianos
by Starre - 10/30/20 12:49 PM
Tuning Pin Bushings Prevent Glue Seepage
by Duaner - 10/30/20 12:46 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics202,491
Posts3,018,761
Members99,068
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4