2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.9 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Petrof Pianos
Petrof Pianos
(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Karsten Collection
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
Who's Online Now
65 members (Beowulf, 20/20 Vision, @23sss, CoogerTown, clothearednincompo, 17 invisible), 495 guests, and 408 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
#1964025 09/25/12 01:39 AM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
C
CWPiano Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
Dear teachers, I have just completed writing a short article detailing various ways a piano teacher can motivate students in their lessons. I hope you find this useful and feel free to ask further questions in this thread if you have any questions specific to this topic.

PDF version of the article downloadable here

Feel free to visit the Resources section of my website here to check out my other articles and free resources.


Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers

by Charles Wu

Learning a musical instrument is by no means a walk in the park. Research has suggested that it takes an average of 10000 hours for a person to be proficient in an instrument. Clearly, it will take some time before you can spit out a decent rendition of a Beethoven’s Piano Sonata on your piano. In fact, the learning curve actually increases as students get more proficient. Repertoires become longer and more complex; they also require more robust technique coupled with deeper theoretical understanding of the music. The prospect is definitely a daunting one for many students.

Once the initial excitement of starting lessons dies down, many students often find their interests slowly waning. Teachers have lost students because their students do not enjoy their lessons anymore. ABRSM’s exam statistic shows the number of students taking grade 8 is only approximately 1/7 or 1/8 of those taking grade 1. Clearly, this is a real problem and many teachers have asked me advice on how to motivate their students to improve their retention rates. Many parents also list the ability to motivate students as a key factor when searching teachers for their children.

Motivating students is a very broad subject and an in-depth discussion on this issue will probably warrant a more complex medium. I will try my best to present an overview of the important factors involved to provide teachers with general ideas and starting points they can use in their lessons.

Ensure sustained and comfortable progress

As mentioned earlier, many students encounter increased learning curve and this corresponds to slower rate of progress for them. As a teacher, you will need to ensure that there are constant tangible results in your students’ journeys; otherwise they may get demoralised. Like it or not, students will benchmark their current progresses to standards they are aware of, such as what their friends are learning or grade levels. And if they feel they are lagging behind the accepted norm, this can dampen their interests. This is the point where students will start saying negative reinforcements such as “What is the point of learning anymore? I will never be good at this.”

You will need to communicate clearly to your students about the amount of progress they can expect to achieve within a specified frame of time. Be honest about what they can expect to accomplish based on what you have learnt about their capabilities and learning speed. Some students may relish difficult challenges whereas others may prefer more leisurely pace. Not all your students will be equal and setting equal standards for everyone may cause discontentment. The slower ones will feel frustrated for lagging behind and the faster ones may feel that you are holding them back.

Set clear goals and milestones that your students can realistically achieve. These milestones can range from a simple one such as completion of an assigned piece to a major one such as a successful execution of a recital or exam. Intertwine simple and major goals to provide steady satisfaction to students; setting only big long term goals may cause learning fatigue. Be very specific when communicating these expectations and be clear about the requirements to achieve them.

Some examples of milestones or goals you can set for students:
- You will learn and perform from memory this piece at an informal concert in two months. You will practice this piece consistently during these two months and we will go through this piece in each lesson following up to the concert.
- You will prepare for an ABRSM grade 5 practical exam next March and attempt to get at least a merit. You will need to finish all the required components two months before the exam date.

After setting these goals and putting your students through the motions to achieve them, you will need to observe them carefully and if necessary adjust them based on their actual progresses and reactions. You may encourage them to achieve their goals, but be honest and realistic when needed. Failure to achieve a goal will affect a student’s morale greatly and cause him/her to lose his trust in you. If a student is faltering, be flexible and adjust the goals and if necessary you may even replace the goals with easier ones first. Remember that these goals are not the ends in themselves, but are means to guides students to grow in their learning journeys.

Be passionate yourself

If you want your students to be passionate about learning music, you will need to show the same passion in teaching them. Remember, passion is infectious. Be willing to talk about the music your students are playing and don’t shy from demonstrating on the instrument. Be genuinely interested in their lessons and show evidences of preparation and knowledge of the levels you are teaching. Be aware of what are going on in your students’ lives; though take care to maintain a professional barrier between you and your students.

Help your students to appreciate music outside lessons as well. Most students would love to listen and appreciate classical music; it's just that they lack starting points. As a teacher, you can gradually expose repertoire that will appeal to them. There are a few ways of doing this. You could give your students listening lists. And you could notify your students about upcoming concerts they might be interested in. Remember to take into account your students’ musical preferences; children would like to see something more entertaining such as an acted out rendition of Prokofiev’s ‘Peter and the Wolves’ whereas adults may prefer to listen to more substantial classical works such as Beethoven’s symphonies.

Develop independence in learning

Though some degree of rote learning may be unavoidable especially at the earlier stages of picking up an instrument, you should aim to develop your students’ capabilities to supervise their own learning. Failure to do so will affect overall proficiencies of your students and this may cause great frustrations down the road. Avoid ‘copy and paste’ teaching style; as much as possible let your students learn their repertoires by themselves. Provide necessary guidance such as ways to tackle more technical passages, musical details to watch out for, how to divide a piece into sections for practice, etc. In the event that you need to ask your students to copy what you do, do explain the reasons to them rather than just asking them to blindly do so.

Let your students be responsible for their learning. They need to feel that that you trust and respect them. Encourage your students to be more proactive in lessons. Don't shy from asking your students questions and to analyse their own playing. Make them think instead of you doing the thinking for them all the time. Cultivate the habit of marking their own scores and noting down their homework. Stipulate what is necessary, but avoid dictating every single thing your students do.

Though understandably some teachers are overly controlling to ensure consistent results, some students may feel demotivated as they feel restricted and stifled. Be open to suggestions from your students and allow them some freedom in expressing their music even if you do not exactly agree with them. Remember that your students are unique individuals, not robots. Respecting your students' individualities will go a long way towards improving their self-esteems.

Assign appropriate repertoire and materials

Compared to other instrumentalists, pianists probably are the most fortunate as the breadth of repertoire and materials available is simply staggering. Tragically though, many students who stopped lessons often cite boring and uninteresting repertoire choice in their lessons as one of the main reasons they lost interests. Appropriate repertoire choice goes a long way to keep a student motivated. Practice is hard work involving significant amount of repetition; obviously if students enjoy the pieces they are playing practice sessions will be much more bearable.

Assign or let your students choose materials that are suitable for their technical levels and interests. Make sure you have a good selection of materials available in your studio so you can cater to a wide range of musical preferences. If you are not sure what to get, there are plenty of excellent compilations of pieces ordered according to grades/levels. There are also repertoire guides by pedagogues such as Jane Magrath, Maurice Hinson, and Trevor Barnard if you are looking for specific repertoire. Consulting various exam boards’ syllabi may also give you general ideas of repertoire available for each level.

Repertoire assigned should also correspond appropriately to your students’ musical preferences. For example, young children would probably prefer to learn catchy descriptive pieces such as Schumann’s ‘Happy Farmer’, whereas an expressive lyrical piece such as a Chopin’s Nocturne would be more suitable for older mature students. Demonstrate the pieces or play the recordings for your students to get an idea of what they like. As you teach your students over a longer period of time, you will also understand their musical preferences and hence would be able to shortlist more appropriate repertoire for them.

Mix pieces of varying difficulties and lengths to keep students constantly motivated. Long and difficult pieces give great satisfaction when learnt well, but students working solely on these pieces may experience mental fatigue over time. So it is a good idea to mix in easier and shorter pieces along the way to provide motivation boost along the way.

Sometimes you may have to assign pieces or materials that your students may not really appreciate or enjoy e.g. technical exercises, sight reading exercises, etc. Do explain to your students the benefits of learning them so they will still practice them.

Vary your approach with each student

Every student who engages your service is a unique individual with specific set of strengths and weaknesses. Each of them also has his/her own personality, interest level and learning style. There are also other variables to consider such as school schedule, frequency of lessons, attention span, learning disability, etc. Adopting a singular approach towards all your students will most likely result in some complications resulting in negative experiences in lessons.

Tailor made your lesson plans according to your students' capabilities and interests. Your approach should also vary according to their ages and personalities. For example for the more serious teenagers, you can adopt a more formal tone for lessons. Whereas for young children you might want to incorporate more games and use simpler words they understand. This is very important as you want each of your students to feel as comfortable as possible in your lessons.

Be open to new teaching techniques. Limiting yourself to techniques and methods that you are familiar with will affect your ability to adapt to each student. We live in age where piano pedagogies have matured and are still constantly evolving. The breadth of resources and methods available to piano teachers today allow for very versatile approaches to different types of students. The possibilities are immense; embracing them will give you more options to enrich your lessons to be more than just dry academic study.

Involve your students’ parents or sibling whenever possible. Their involvements can range from assisting in practice to bringing the students out for concerts. Your students will see them much more often than you and their loved ones’ supports can make a big difference. Whenever possible you can ask them to sit in your students’ lesson or you can also communicate to them what they can do during the week to help. Learning classical piano can be quite lonely and having people around will give an added layer of social interaction that will help sustain your students’ interests.


Singapore based private teacher specialising in accelerated ABRSM course.
Author of Visual Guides to Scales and Arpeggios.
Visit my website at www.wunadymusicstudio.com
(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
CWPiano #1964080 09/25/12 05:33 AM
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 6
M
Junior Member
Offline
Junior Member
M
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 6
This is a topic that generally interests me very much, because I feel that motivating students who might need that push, in most cases is a fundamental aspect of our job. However, the claim that research shows that you need 10,000 hours worth of training to achieve, or whatever amount it is, is clearly false because it is undeniably arbitrary. I couldn't stand to read past that statement (it is in the very beginning). Although I completely agree with the spirit of what you are trying to convey, if I were a parent of a student or a student, I would be very turned off by this cliche assertion.

Last edited by music_disseminator; 09/25/12 05:42 AM.
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
music_disseminator #1964090 09/25/12 06:37 AM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
C
CWPiano Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
Originally Posted by music_disseminator
This is a topic that generally interests me very much, because I feel that motivating students who might need that push, in most cases is a fundamental aspect of our job. However, the claim that research shows that you need 10,000 hours worth of training to achieve, or whatever amount it is, is clearly false because it is undeniably arbitrary. I couldn't stand to read past that statement (it is in the very beginning). Although I completely agree with the spirit of what you are trying to convey, if I were a parent of a student or a student, I would be very turned off by this cliche assertion.


The so-called 10000 hour rule is a cliche maybe, but I don't think we can dismiss it just as such. I needed to make a point that picking up piano is not an easy feat; this is something I always convey to my students and their parents beforehand. But of course with structured and efficient practice, the difficulty and consequently the time required to pick up the instrument could be reduced. However, the cliche that more is better is unfortunately still very prevalent today, even among teachers. Do give the article a read, it is by no means perfect, but I am always open to suggestions and I appreciate the comment you had giv


Singapore based private teacher specialising in accelerated ABRSM course.
Author of Visual Guides to Scales and Arpeggios.
Visit my website at www.wunadymusicstudio.com
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
CWPiano #1964093 09/25/12 06:47 AM
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 135
T
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
T
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 135
"Picking up the piano" != "mastering the piano to concert performer level", though.


Private piano teacher since 2003
Member:
ASME (Australian Society for Music Education),
ANZCA (Australian and New Zealand Cultural Arts),
KMEIA (Kodály Music Education Institute of Australia).
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
Theme&Variations #1964115 09/25/12 08:15 AM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
C
CWPiano Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
Originally Posted by Theme&Variations
"Picking up the piano" != "mastering the piano to concert performer level", though.


Very true, it's very important to know what students want to achieve out of their lessons. Some may plan to join full time study, some may want to become teachers themselves, some just want to be able to play their dream pieces, etc. Teaching approach will have to vary depending on these goals. Good point, I will add this in when i revise the article in the future.


Singapore based private teacher specialising in accelerated ABRSM course.
Author of Visual Guides to Scales and Arpeggios.
Visit my website at www.wunadymusicstudio.com
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
CWPiano #1964217 09/25/12 12:10 PM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 626
M
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
M
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 626
Here's a what not to do: Don't tell a kid that every week they have been brilliant but this week they were progressing...but just ordinary progress... Just tell them what works and doesn't work and your expectation.

LOL, my daughter was indifferent to the comment but if it continues, she won't be. I'm not sure why, but her recital piece is hard for her - she has it memorized but still makes mistakes - she does like it. She doesn't like the piece she had to learn this week at all. She keeps going back to the book before and playing the bluesy pieces.

This is where natural ability (good memorization skills, great reader and holds concepts well, very mathy kid, coordinated), meets work (she is starting level 3 and just completed 1 year of piano). Not knowing anything about piano myself, I see a difference in her, piano suddenly requires more effort. It's not a bad thing, I value effort. I just hope her teacher doesn't expect "brilliant" vs "progressing" or continue to seem disappointed with her progress.

Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
CWPiano #1964273 09/25/12 01:40 PM
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,639
7000 Post Club Member
Offline
7000 Post Club Member
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,639
Just a quibble here, over terminology. If I understand behavioral science correctly, only you can motivate yourself. I cannot motivate you. I can provide incentives which may help with your motivation, or disincentives, which will quench your motivation. Hopefully, we all provide positive environments for our students.

FWIW, I find that students, up until ages 8 - 10, and perhaps a few outliers, are motivated to please their parents or some other authority figure, and will work tirelessly to do so. Once students horizons begin to expand beyond the immediate family, factors which incentivize often change to peer group dynamics. We teachers need to pay attention to this change, and then offer incentives which support this, rather than depend on parental approval. As students reach their high school years, actualization begins to replace peer dynamics, and again, our teaching approach needs to change.


"Those who dare to teach must never cease to learn." -- Richard Henry Dann
Full-time Private Piano Teacher offering Piano Lessons in Olympia, WA. www.mypianoteacher.com
Certified by the American College of Musicians; member NGPT, MTNA, WSMTA, OMTA
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
John v.d.Brook #1964304 09/25/12 02:36 PM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,585
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,585
Originally Posted by John v.d.Brook
up until ages 8 - 10, and perhaps a few outliers, are motivated to please their parents or some other authority figure, and will work tirelessly to do so.

That used to be true. But somehow I'm seeing more and more spoiled brats each with an array of extracurricular activities to keep them occupied. I think it's a case of the parents' trying to please their children, no the other way around.


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
CWPiano #1964325 09/25/12 03:14 PM
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 275
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 275
CWPiano, I normally lurk on the Adult Beginners Forum, but since I'm a language teacher by training I like to look in on the teachers' forum as well.

I'm glad to see you advocate making a variety of materials available to students. I took piano lessons for 2 years when I was 8 or 9. My parents didn't pressure me to practice. I never practiced (maybe an hour before my lesson every week), gave it up, and went on to another instrument.

I'm now going back to piano in middle age, and am loving it.

The big reason I never practiced as a kid was that I never liked any of the music the teacher gave me. She didn't use a method book or any of the entry-level classical repertoire. She would simply hand me the sheet music we'd be working on next.

I can't name the genre of her choices. They had no genre. Not for children, particularly, but not anything an adult would listen to.

My parents were classical music lovers. I would have been motivated to work on simplified classical pieces or things that clearly led to the classical repertoire.

But at that age I was too shy to tell her I was bored with her choices, and she never asked. Odd, since she had a daughter my age.

She didn't seem too upset when I finally quit...

Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
BrainCramp #1964330 09/25/12 03:23 PM
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,585
8000 Post Club Member
Offline
8000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 8,585
Originally Posted by BrainCramp
I can't name the genre of her choices. They had no genre. Not for children, particularly, but not anything an adult would listen to.

Did your teacher drown you in Bartok's Mikrokosmos?


Private Piano Teacher and MTAC Member
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
AZNpiano #1964339 09/25/12 03:33 PM
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 275
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Apr 2012
Posts: 275
No, AZN, they were pieces. Forgettable pieces, apparently, since I've forgotten them all. Never in a book - always separate sheet music - so it was impossible to know where they came from.

She didn't have me do scales or other technique exercises. Mikrokosmos wouldn't have been her type of thing.

She was really big on hand and body position. I must say, decades later I have good hand and body position. That really sank in and stayed.

Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
BrainCramp #1964480 09/25/12 08:22 PM
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 135
T
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
T
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 135
Originally Posted by BrainCramp
She was really big on hand and body position. I must say, decades later I have good hand and body position. That really sank in and stayed.


If only the music itself hadn't turned you off!


Private piano teacher since 2003
Member:
ASME (Australian Society for Music Education),
ANZCA (Australian and New Zealand Cultural Arts),
KMEIA (Kodály Music Education Institute of Australia).
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
MaggieGirl #1964543 09/25/12 11:50 PM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
C
CWPiano Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
Originally Posted by MaggieGirl
Here's a what not to do: Don't tell a kid that every week they have been brilliant but this week they were progressing...but just ordinary progress... Just tell them what works and doesn't work and your expectation.

LOL, my daughter was indifferent to the comment but if it continues, she won't be. I'm not sure why, but her recital piece is hard for her - she has it memorized but still makes mistakes - she does like it. She doesn't like the piece she had to learn this week at all. She keeps going back to the book before and playing the bluesy pieces.

This is where natural ability (good memorization skills, great reader and holds concepts well, very mathy kid, coordinated), meets work (she is starting level 3 and just completed 1 year of piano). Not knowing anything about piano myself, I see a difference in her, piano suddenly requires more effort. It's not a bad thing, I value effort. I just hope her teacher doesn't expect "brilliant" vs "progressing" or continue to seem disappointed with her progress.


I think the issue you mentioned is quite common among young children. There seems to be this misconception among quite a few teachers that young children are fragile things that will break easily if even the slightest criticism is given. From my experience, this is simply not true. Children can appreciate good playing too and being able to play to a high standard themselves can be very motivating as well.

I fully agree that honest assessment is the best approach here. Praises and criticisms need to be dispensed in balanced manner. Overpraising and compromising on quality of playing often lead to problems down the road as the difficulty increases.

Last edited by CWPiano; 09/25/12 11:55 PM.

Singapore based private teacher specialising in accelerated ABRSM course.
Author of Visual Guides to Scales and Arpeggios.
Visit my website at www.wunadymusicstudio.com
Re: Motivating Students – A Brief Guide for Piano Teachers
BrainCramp #1964547 09/25/12 11:55 PM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
C
CWPiano Offline OP
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
C
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
Originally Posted by BrainCramp
CWPiano, I normally lurk on the Adult Beginners Forum, but since I'm a language teacher by training I like to look in on the teachers' forum as well.

I'm glad to see you advocate making a variety of materials available to students. I took piano lessons for 2 years when I was 8 or 9. My parents didn't pressure me to practice. I never practiced (maybe an hour before my lesson every week), gave it up, and went on to another instrument.

I'm now going back to piano in middle age, and am loving it.

The big reason I never practiced as a kid was that I never liked any of the music the teacher gave me. She didn't use a method book or any of the entry-level classical repertoire. She would simply hand me the sheet music we'd be working on next.

I can't name the genre of her choices. They had no genre. Not for children, particularly, but not anything an adult would listen to.

My parents were classical music lovers. I would have been motivated to work on simplified classical pieces or things that clearly led to the classical repertoire.

But at that age I was too shy to tell her I was bored with her choices, and she never asked. Odd, since she had a daughter my age.

She didn't seem too upset when I finally quit...


Some teachers prefer to teach pieces they are already familiar; either stuff they have personally learnt or taught before. In my country where music exams are prevalant, quite a few teachers decide to teach their students exactly same pieces for exam purpose. One of the biggest complaints from students who transferred to me was that they did not enjoy the pieces they played for exam. And there was no negotiation or effort at all to choose other pieces from the list of pieces specified for the exam.


Singapore based private teacher specialising in accelerated ABRSM course.
Author of Visual Guides to Scales and Arpeggios.
Visit my website at www.wunadymusicstudio.com

Moderated by  Ken Knapp 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Hand Sanitizer for Musicians
Hand Sanitizer for Musicians
Musician's Hand Sanitizer available in our online store (and our Maple Street Music shop in Cornish Maine). Antibacterial, 62% ethyl alcohol. Hand Sanitizer for Musicians
Tons more music related products in our online store!
What's Hot!!
News from the Piano World
Where Did The Buttons Go?!
----------------------
Our April 2020 Newsletter Available Online Now...
The Piano World During the Pandemic!
----------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Upgrading to Kawai CA99
by Beowulf - 05/28/20 08:36 AM
Kawai CA58 display
by ChrisGoesPiano - 05/28/20 04:58 AM
Do you teach sight reading?
by Ubu - 05/28/20 04:37 AM
Tool Backpack
by TimM_980 - 05/28/20 12:47 AM
Looking for a piano
by ThePenist - 05/28/20 12:25 AM
Forum Statistics
Forums41
Topics199,226
Posts2,963,043
Members97,209
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers


Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2020 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4