Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 2.7 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
What's Hot!!
PIANO TEACHERS Please read this!
-------------------
European Tour for Piano Lovers
JOIN US FOR THE TOUR!
--------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
Find a Professional
Our Classified Ads
Find Piano Professionals-

*Piano Dealers - Piano Stores
*Piano Tuners
*Piano Teachers
*Piano Movers
*Piano Restorations
*Piano Manufacturers

Advertise on Piano World

Who's Online Now
135 registered members (anotherscott, Beowulf, 36251, ASilotiCoffee, Amedeus, ando, 90125, barbaram, 31 invisible), 1,299 guests, and 3 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Quick Links to Useful Piano & Music Resources
Quick Links:
*Advertise On Piano World
*Free Piano Newsletter
*Online Piano Recitals
*Piano Recitals Index
*Piano & Music Accessories
*Live Piano Venues
*Music School Listings
* Buying a Piano
*Buying A Acoustic Piano
*Buying a Digital Piano
*Pianos for Sale
*Sell Your Piano
*How Old is My Piano?
*Directory/Site Map
*Virtual Piano
*Music Word Search
*Piano Videos
*Virtual Piano Chords & Scales
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 19 of 28 1 2 17 18 19 20 21 27 28
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026716
02/04/13 05:34 AM
02/04/13 05:34 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Dear rxd,I use a thick crochet hook, but in order to remove rust from the strings. I release a pin half a turn, and treated with a place in the capo (bar plate). I have not understand out how to reduce the diameter when we are just massage a curve into it hook on the back side of string?

I'm intensively and seriously working to make a temperament. I use the lever and a mute. While the results are negative unfortunately


Can you make a video when you tune an unison ?

I can't make "tune an unison video" now because I have not own camera,sorry


MAx, please do so when it will be possible, so you can have more useful comments.


Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
(ad 800)
PTG Convention
PTG Journal
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: rXd] #2026718
02/04/13 05:55 AM
02/04/13 05:55 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by rxd
Good question, Max.


I have just quickly checked 45 very heavily played pianos here that have been tuned with a T- hammer on their last tuning. I had no tuning to do. For me, the speed is marginally faster than anything else I use.

I did this so that I could talk with some authority about my experience.

There is an awful lot of stuff on this forum that really should be prefaced with the words "I would think" or "I imagine".

I am a 6'1 medium build person and perhaps a little stronger than most but by absolutely no means the bodybuilder type. I find that turning a T hammer clockwise takes no more thumb pressure (RH) than it takes on a lever in order to turn a springy pin without springing it. The reverse is usually just to set the pin so doesn't take much.

I use pure pin setting and let the students do my test blows so I don't beat them in. I feel the string instead.

The last time I wrote on this tool, I mentioned that I couldn't make pure turning motions with it. After 10 days of two hours with it every morning, I find that I can turn a pin in smaller and smaller increments without springing it. (eliminating the "marshmallow zone").
I don't really know what I'm doing different. More thumb pressure, perhaps?



RXD, may be you should state how many verticals and how many grands, on a grand I feel the T hammer is more easy.

The T hammer is perfect to evaluate how much spring is in the pin itself (in its vertical plane).

Are you stating there is none , or something else ? (the marshmallow zone contains part of that, part of wood springness, and certainly part of flagpole in the non interesting direction)

If you leave tuning blows for the student, you are tuning exactly as I did before learning that other way , exactly wink

I will try to compare sensations with both levers with a similar final pin setting.

Are you stating that the pin itself cannot be left springy ?


I tend to believe that the thumb used to counteract the flagpolling, may not be very efficient. why ? I dont imagine myself pulling a heavy weight with my thumb pressure.

I have used my thumb on the lever to lower flagpolling for years and still do naturally sometime, but since I have learned to fell the pin in the prolongation of the wire (the sensation of slow pull is that, not opposite to usual method, but the stiffening of the pin is similar to the one of the wire, and in the end the whole system is manipulated as if it was one part, that are the sensations, not the physics, but if you are slow enough when raising and adding stress, you have a feel of total control on the whole system.
Very agreable and allow perfect control to the tiniest motions.

The drawback is that the metal of the pin itself seem to ask for some time to settle later, (I said "seem to")

You get to the same firmness with the back and forth motions on the lever until nothing moves.

With the T hammer you may be experimenting the slow pull sensations, in the end ...

[video:youtube]ARa7_BAFq94&feature=share&list=UUxpzVWHLg5OaZj8GigTDUSQ[/video]


PS I have to make another video for unison. but the lever manipulation is standard, I suppose.




Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026720
02/04/13 06:22 AM
02/04/13 06:22 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
In the end when I say the pin is under some torque a little more low than usually, that mean the stress coming from the wire to the tuning pin is braked on a larger zone in the hole.

That mean using the springness of the pinblock and the one from the tuning pin together. the impact forces (shock waves )coming from the string, are then adbsorbed by the friction between the pin and the block more efficiently , on a larger portion of the pin.

It is felt in the pin, the top of the pin is more rigid than with the usual pin setting .

It is heard in the tone (that is proof if any necessary) as the tone is stronger on the fundamental.

Possibly the pin is allowed less back and forth motion, hence a little less Lmode allowed or normal partials, but as I hear a clearing of the high end of the spectra it may well be the Lmodes that are lowered.

There a recording and spectra analysis may show that more accurately (but it is flagrant that a firm pin setting have avery different tone than a minimal one, also, many tuners may have noticed that)

Sorry Max for the OT, but pin setting play a huge role in tone, then in justness, not only on the fact that the note stay clean.



Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: rXd] #2026734
02/04/13 07:36 AM
02/04/13 07:36 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by rxd

Note to Max.

The way you use your T-bar hammer frightens me. The tool you have lends itself to abuse too easily and there are too many bad habits to eradicate. Please stay with the lever for me. I know it is like starting all over again and that is the best thing, right here, right now.

Dear rxd,I never use my home-made T-hammers here. No need it's do but sometime only just original T. When a pin don't turn or very weak

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: rXd] #2026738
02/04/13 08:02 AM
02/04/13 08:02 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by rxd
The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?

Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Olek] #2026747
02/04/13 08:27 AM
02/04/13 08:27 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by Olek
are then adbsorbed by the friction between the pin and the block more efficiently , on a larger portion of the pin.

Isaac,are you wrote here "d" ? absorbed

Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026748
02/04/13 08:28 AM
02/04/13 08:28 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by rxd

Note to Max.

The way you use your T-bar hammer frightens me. The tool you have lends itself to abuse too easily and there are too many bad habits to eradicate. Please stay with the lever for me. I know it is like starting all over again and that is the best thing, right here, right now.

Dear rxd,I never use my home-made T-hammers here. No need it's do but sometime only just original T. When a pin don't turn or very weak


I believe the normal L lever is better for that case also, better control on pin


Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026749
02/04/13 08:29 AM
02/04/13 08:29 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
are then adbsorbed by the friction between the pin and the block more efficiently , on a larger portion of the pin.

Isaac,are you wrote here "d" ? absorbed


Probably , my spell checker say adsorbed indeed , sorry.

In French "absorber" , with "b" in English absorbed (?)

Last edited by Olek; 02/04/13 08:32 AM.

Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026753
02/04/13 08:37 AM
02/04/13 08:37 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by rxd
The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?


When replacing with modern wire yes often less thick is used, but not always.
The steel quality was very different, often with phosphorous traces, it gives a very different tone.

Now the steel is clean, but obtained with recycling, while I dont see how it makes a difference in the end.

The carbon in the steel also migrates with time in the wire, (from where to where ?)

so what we hear of old wire today is very different that what it was.

Did you notice that in Eastern countries, some steel wire is having little rust ? or the pianos you see have much rust ?



Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Olek] #2026754
02/04/13 08:38 AM
02/04/13 08:38 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by rxd

Note to Max.

The way you use your T-bar hammer frightens me. The tool you have lends itself to abuse too easily and there are too many bad habits to eradicate. Please stay with the lever for me. I know it is like starting all over again and that is the best thing, right here, right now.

Dear rxd,I never use my home-made T-hammers here. No need it's do but sometime only just original T. When a pin don't turn or very weak


I believe the normal L lever is better for that case also, better control on pin

Isaac,you're lucky that you have never tried tuning soviet pianos end of the fifties

Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026757
02/04/13 08:41 AM
02/04/13 08:41 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
I say you so because it is easier to brake the pin with a L lever and have some precision.

When you will be at ease with the L lever you will understand why.

I have tuned Holstein, Legnicas, Tcheikas, and other strange pianos with poor gluing (I have seen one Holstein with all soundboard ribs unglued)

The job is the same whatever the piano is, but of course design and construction make it easy for the tuner.


Yes sometime you feel the pin is stuck in a piece of soap, that is when I go back on reverse again and again until I feel the pin begin to grip a little (if it can)

Bending the pin as you where doing 2 years ago cannot help, it even ovalise the pinblock a little more.

But we force on the block (on the top, less important part of the hole) to gain some springness when there is none. Sometime it helps.

Last edited by Olek; 02/04/13 08:46 AM.

Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Olek] #2026762
02/04/13 08:50 AM
02/04/13 08:50 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
[quote=rxd] The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?

or the pianos you see have much rust ?
I'm afraid "rust string of piano". It's damage should be cleans with aceton

Last edited by Maximillyan; 02/04/13 08:51 AM.
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Olek] #2026772
02/04/13 09:01 AM
02/04/13 09:01 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by Olek

I have tuned Holstein, Legnicas, Tcheikas, and other strange pianos with poor gluing (I have seen one Holstein with all soundboard ribs unglued)

I never have not tuned Holstein. But Legnica, Tcheikas it's very good vertical. Poland Legnica have very nice sound. A pins very hard set in pinblock and I'm use L-hammer for tuning

Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026774
02/04/13 09:07 AM
02/04/13 09:07 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
[quote=rxd] The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?

or the pianos you see have much rust ?
I'm afraid "rust string of piano". It's damage should be cleans with aceton


If aceton can clean it, it is very little rust, you could use benzine to clean strings (fluid for lighters) .
Rust is strong corrosion.

ABout the pins in soap like pin block, think that if you turn anti clockwise (only a little) then clockwise but VERY slowly , inside the hole some layers of the wood have the fiber that change orientation.

I noticed that doing that move again and again, at some point you begin to have a little grip showing.

Then you can tune

(this is because it is just a braking, as with cars, 2 surfaces and friction between them) the larger the surface the better the friction, if we can obtain that the pin get springy INSIDE the hole, we can set pins even on difficult pianos



Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Olek] #2026790
02/04/13 09:34 AM
02/04/13 09:34 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
[quote=rxd] The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?

or the pianos you see have much rust ?
I'm afraid "rust string of piano". It's damage should be cleans with aceton


If aceton can clean it, it is very little rust, you could use benzine to clean strings (fluid for lighters) .
Rust is strong corrosion.

The main thing that the string that has the rust has not passed into the zone of plastic deformation

Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026793
02/04/13 09:36 AM
02/04/13 09:36 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
[quote=rxd] The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?

or the pianos you see have much rust ?
I'm afraid "rust string of piano". It's damage should be cleans with aceton


If aceton can clean it, it is very little rust, you could use benzine to clean strings (fluid for lighters) .
Rust is strong corrosion.

The main thing that the string that has the rust has not passed into the zone of plastic deformation


Yes, usually you will have enough margin before that, only in the treble the wire is nearer that zone.

But with the aging of the metal in time probably it loose its elasticity enough to get there, indeed


Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Olek] #2026810
02/04/13 09:59 AM
02/04/13 09:59 AM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Maximillyan Online embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member
Maximillyan  Online Embarrased OP
2000 Post Club Member

Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,381
KZ
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
Originally Posted by Olek
Originally Posted by Maximillyan
[quote=rxd] The T- hammer was used exusively for early instruments. A lever was probably not even considered. the string diameters were thinner, made of brass and smaller pins. Much easier to turn.
As wire diameters became thicker in pianos and higher tensions were beginning to be used, a T-hammer was still sufficient.


my question.
Modern standart diameter strings changed, it became thicker. If so, the old piano with thicker strings had a different voice (tembr).It's a more noble and subdued. Thin strings are more prone fast to loose of tone. Is this so?

or the pianos you see have much rust ?
I'm afraid "rust string of piano". It's damage should be cleans with aceton

ABout the pins in soap like pin block, think that if you turn anti clockwise (only a little) then clockwise but VERY slowly , inside the hole some layers of the wood have the fiber that change orientation.


I do so. I pull out the tip of the string out of the hole pin. After with slight pressure on the pin doing 2-3 turns clockwise use T-bar. (Or unscrew pin on 2-3 turns) A pin in pinblock to introduce a few engages the part of the wood is not worked out a pinblocka and a bush. I'm to install the tip string and to make the tone. Sometimes it helps

Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026825
02/04/13 10:44 AM
02/04/13 10:44 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Max, my experience :

Never unscrew the tuning pins (never turn it counter clockwise)

I was talking of turning the pin may be 5 degrees maximum just to move very little the wood fiber then back to move it in the good direction.

IF you want may be you can screw it a little (3 turns=) but you have to do that so slowly it is not really possible when you are tuning in a customer home.

Tuners that turn the tuning pin 2.5 turn back when changing a broken string always leave a less firm tuning pin at that place


COntrarely to the common belief that the more you manipulate a pin the less it is firm, under certain circumstances and with the good method it can be benefit

Last edited by Olek; 02/04/13 12:18 PM.

Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026828
02/04/13 10:51 AM
02/04/13 10:51 AM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
Visibly it is of no interest for nobody , untill I see a Youtube video or someone showing that in another forum, as it happened with other tricks ... LOL


Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Re: What think technicians about of max's temperament? [Re: Maximillyan] #2026879
02/04/13 12:25 PM
02/04/13 12:25 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
O
Olek Offline
9000 Post Club Member
Olek  Offline
9000 Post Club Member
O

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,230
France
MAX, the more you turn the pin counter clock wise, the more you "sand" the hole in the worst direction. possibly on the video you could do the same, take out the string then screw the pin, but experience showed me (and others) that it is more efficient to tap on the pin with a hammer without taking the wire out.

A tool to avoid the fast untwisting of the pin when it is tapped is better than tapping it only. I have such a tool with a "plunge" - may be one of your tuning hammers could to that too (I will send a picture)

then insert the pin may be 1 or 2 mm, you will have enough fresh wood o make the tuning pin firm (usually for some time, but with a better pin setting technique it can be a very long time)


Last edited by Olek; 02/04/13 12:27 PM.

Professional of the profession.
Foo Foo specialist
I wish to add some kind and sensitive phrase but nothing comes to mind.!
Page 19 of 28 1 2 17 18 19 20 21 27 28

Moderated by  Piano World 

(ad)
Pianoteq
PianoTeq Petrof
(ad)
Sweetwater - Keyboards
Sweetwater
ad
Jazz Piano Online
Jazz Piano Lessons Online

New Topics - Multiple Forums
Thomas Young 1 temperament measured
by Hakki. 01/21/19 10:08 AM
Debussy - Arabesque No. 1
by cmb13. 01/21/19 09:11 AM
Saving to WAV or MP3 on a Kawai CA
by Garald. 01/21/19 08:26 AM
Naming convention of classical pieces
by Artur Gajewski. 01/21/19 08:16 AM
Help, pain when playing the piano!
by Hengsen10. 01/21/19 01:18 AM
Forum Statistics
Forums40
Topics189,708
Posts2,784,307
Members92,171
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
(ad)
Accu-Tuner
Sanderson Accu-Tuner
Please Support Our Advertisers
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

Sweetwater

PianoTeq Petrof
Piano Buyer Spring 2018
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers


 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter |


copyright 1997 - 2018 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.2