2017 was our 20th year online!

Welcome to the Piano World Piano Forums
Over 3 million posts about pianos, digital pianos, and all types of keyboard instruments.
Over 100,000 members from around the world.
Join the World's Largest Community of Piano Lovers (it's free)
It's Fun to Play the Piano ... Please Pass It On!

Shop our online store for music lovers
SEARCH
Piano Forums & Piano World
(ad)
Best of Piano Buyer
 Best of Piano Buyer
(ad)
Faust Harrison Pianos
Faust Harrison 100+ Steinway pianos
(ad)
Wessell Nickel & Gross
PianoForAll
Who's Online Now
53 members (36251, APianistHasNoName, Abdol, ambrozy, Andrew E., accordeur, bsalad, Bill McKaig,RPT, 12 invisible), 642 guests, and 464 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
(ad)
Estonia Pianos
Estonia Pianos
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
#1823526 01/12/12 05:04 PM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 20
A
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 20
How do you know when you are done "learning" a piece of music. I'm just getting back into this and don't have a piano teacher currently. I realize there is more to "finishing" a piece than simply being able to play the notes. So when do you consider a piece complete?

(ad)
Piano & Music Accessories
piano accessories music gifts tuning and moving equipment
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 39
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 39
I sort of map out what I think finished is to me...
I myself am working with a teacher and discussed my method/idea with her as well so we're on the same page.

So for an example: I am working with Suzuki Book 2 pieces right now and I see these as "learning pieces"; I'm not looking to get them concert ready, but rather play them to the point where I believe I have gotten what I've needed out of the piece. This is sometimes obvious/sometimes not obvious with gradated books: AKA obviously here they want me to practice scales am I doing that well enough? After I "pass" on a piece in the Suzuki book I make sure until I am done with that book to play the piece in review to make sure I still "got it"; and if not review it more.

While I am working with my Suzuki Book 2 "practice/learning" pieces I am also working on Linus and Lucy which I want to be a "concert ready" piece. Here I will polish up and try to work as close to 100% on tonality, feeling and memorization as I can.

Just IMO take what works for you!
-BB


Working on...
Suzuki Book 2: Minuet 2 by Bach
Linus and Lucy
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 461
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 461
Of course none of us are ever really done learning a piece, but for me the best test of "done-ness" is in the performance which can lead to a few functional definitions of doneness:

1) You know the piece pretty well and can play it usually without too many mistakes.
2) You can now play it well enough to perform it for mom.
3) You play it well enough to perform it for your significant other.
4) You know it well enough to feel comfortable playing it in front of a few friends.
5) You know it well enough to feel comfortable playing it on a stage in front of a hundred or so people.

Last edited by petes1; 01/12/12 09:07 PM.

Keys: Yamaha GC2, Casio Privia PX-3, Roland RD800, Alesis VI61, Yamaha YC61, Pianoteq 7.0, Native Instruments, Gig Performer
My motto: Play and Let Play!
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,171
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,171
Originally Posted by ajarvis445
How do you know when you are done "learning" a piece of music.


Try recording yourself! If you can get a good recording of it that you're not ashamed to show your friends or family, (or if you play it live and unabashed, better yet!) then you've you've got it under your fingers.

When the pressure is on, there is no doubt whether you know it or not.

But, there is plenty of room to use pieces to learn from without any added pressure of performance. Do what you gotta do to get those fingers cooperating and get to the place where you want to be.


Learning to play since June 2009.
My piano diary on You Tube: http://www.youtube.com/user/afpaSTU1096
[Linked Image] <- 10+ ABF recitals
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 708
N
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
N
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 708
I endorse Petes1's comments.


Guitar since 1966. Piano (Kawai DP80) since 2011.
Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 5,859
W
5000 Post Club Member
Offline
5000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 5,859
Keep an eye on how much progress is made.

If the progress falls below the threshold you're done with it.

The threshold depends on how self critical you are (and maybe your teacher)


[Linked Image][Linked Image][Linked Image][Linked Image]
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 192
Full Member
Offline
Full Member
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 192
If I can play the passage or piece in question entirely through using the metronome at a reasonable speed. If I can't, it means that I still don't have the notes and/or fingering and/or rhythm completely mastered.

Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,053
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,053
Originally Posted by CaptainKawai
I endorse Petes1's comments.

+1 thumb


[Linked Image]
SoundCloud | Youtube
Self-taught since Dec2009
"Don't play what's there, play what's not there."
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 622
500 Post Club Member
Offline
500 Post Club Member
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 622
I think it's always good to have the attitude that you are going to turn a "Piece" of music into a performance. So make sure you are more or less 100% confident of what you are playing, and then work on adding expression and dynamics into your music, so an audience can feel your connection with the song.

Listen to some live performances of the music, and use this to inspire you.

Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,281
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,281
I just want to point out that while it's great to polish pieces until they are "performance-ready", you don't have to do this with every piece that you work on. Some you may want to just get to the "play it for mom" level. (Nice list, petes1. smile )


Mary Bee
Current mantra: Play outside the box.
[Linked Image] [Linked Image] [Linked Image] XVI-XXXVI
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 20
A
Full Member
OP Offline
Full Member
A
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 20
petes1 I too like your list of doneness. that's good lol I don't "finish" every piece to the level that I'd play it on stage in front of hundreds of people cause some pieces I play that I don't really like for the technique or learning a new style etc. there's only certain ones I really like (and right now I'm talking years ago when I played regularly) that I would learn to that level "performance" level - IMO anyways haha

Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,034
2000 Post Club Member
Offline
2000 Post Club Member
Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,034
And sometimes you just don't 'love' it enough to put in the work. Often with my lesson pieces we 'leave' a piece before it is polished. If I love the piece i'll continue with it on my own and bring it back for critique later.......sometimes I'm sorry that I did! :-)))!!


It's the journey not the destination..
[Linked Image]
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 3,058
Gold Subscriber
3000 Post Club Member
Offline
Gold Subscriber
3000 Post Club Member
Joined: Dec 2010
Posts: 3,058
There is no single answer, but most people would recognize several stages:

1. First stage is investigating: listening to a recording, playing through slowly HS, HT if possible, figuring out where the hard parts are.

2. What I call "learning" is getting to the point where I can play the piece through, usually from memory, but if not memory, then at least with minimal help from the score. I will have practiced the hard parts already and the piece will flow, though I will still make (a bunch of) errors.

3. When a piece gets to the point where it looks and feels easy, it is at the polished stage. You can play it in front of people and they will say, damn, that looks and sounds like real piano playing.

I work from a method book and "learn" a lot of pieces. Most of them are not pieces I choose to have in my repertoire, so I learn whatever technique or lesson the piece features and then move along to the next piece. Getting to the polished stage takes (for me at least) a lot of time and practice, so I choose carefully.


[Linked Image]
Yamaha C3X
In summer, the song sings itself. --William Carlos Williams

Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,306
W
1000 Post Club Member
Offline
1000 Post Club Member
W
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,306
We're really talking about repertoire building here aren't we? I've found that difficult because I've kept moving on to other pieces and nothing is really maintained as play-able for a guest who happens in my house. So...the goal for this year is to create a repertoire (i.e. finished pieces) from music I've played over the last few years. I'm amazed at how little retention I seem to have. Each one has been starting over...I think I relearn a bit quicker than learn. Here are a few I'm finishing:

Beethoven sonata 49#1
Chopin Albumleaf
Schumann Reverie
Gurlitt Sonatina
Grieg Waltz
Webber All I ask of you
Rocherolle Late Train

They don't make a credible recital but I've liked each one enough to work on it to the level of polish. Who knows I may get close to correct tempo this time around.
Maroney Addie


[Linked Image]
Wise as in learner
Buff as in Colorado Buffalo

Link Copied to Clipboard
What's Hot!!
Pianos - Organs - & Keyboards, Oh My!
My first professionally recorded piece
---------------------
Visit Maine, Meet Mr. Piano World
---------------------
Posting Pictures on the Forums
-------------------
Forums RULES & HELP
-------------------
ADVERTISE on Piano World
(ad)
Pianoteq
Steinway Spiro Layering
(ad)
PianoDisc

PianoDisc
(ad)
Piano Life Saver - Dampp Chaser
Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver
(ad)
Mason & Hamlin Pianos
New Topics - Multiple Forums
Kawai VPC-1 or Roland A88 MKII (or FP30X)?
by detektorosradio - 12/08/21 06:03 PM
Birdcage Piano Tuner needed in Virginia
by zander35 - 12/08/21 04:45 PM
Another "Which Midi Controller Should I Buy"
by cody.carrig - 12/08/21 04:05 PM
Chopin's Polonaise 26/2 and staccato duration
by Mati - 12/08/21 04:04 PM
How good is a Chickering 105 B concert grand?
by tommyhaha - 12/08/21 02:34 PM
Download Sheet Music
Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads
Forum Statistics
Forums42
Topics210,461
Posts3,151,648
Members103,560
Most Online15,252
Mar 21st, 2010
Please Support Our Advertisers

Faust Harrison 100+ Steinways

Dampp Chaser Piano Life Saver

 Best of Piano Buyer

PianoTeq Bechstein
Visit our online store for gifts for music lovers

Virtual Sheet Music - Classical Sheet Music Downloads



 
Help keep the forums up and running with a donation, any amount is appreciated!
Or by becoming a Subscribing member! Thank-you.
Donate   Subscribe
 
Our Piano Related Classified Ads
| Dealers | Tuners | Lessons | Movers | Restorations | Pianos For Sale | Sell Your Piano |

Advertise on Piano World
| Subscribe | Piano World | PianoSupplies.com | Advertise on Piano World |
| |Contact | Privacy | Legal | About Us | Site Map | Free Newsletter | MapleStreetMusicShop.com - Our store in Cornish Maine


© copyright 1997 - 2021 Piano World ® all rights reserved
No part of this site may be reproduced without prior written permission
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5